Posts Tagged ‘ brain development ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Math Skills: What Scientists Can Teach Parents about Kids’ Developing Minds
We know a lot about how babies learn to talk, and youngsters learn to read. Now scientists are unraveling the earliest building blocks of math – and what children know about numbers as they begin first grade seems to play a big role in how well they do everyday calculations later on. (via Huffington Post)

Arguments in the Home Linked with Babies’ Brain Functioning
Being exposed to arguments between parents is associated with the way babies’ brains process emotional tone of voice, according to a new study to be published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (via Science Daily)

Traffic Congestion Causes Childhood Asthma, Study Confirms
For the first time, European researchers have confirmed poor air quality due to congested road traffic is linked to kids’ asthma, the Los Angeles Times reported. A study, published online in the European Respiratory Journal, found 14 percent of childhood asthma cases were attributed to nearby traffic pollution, according to the newspaper. (via Fox News)

North Dakota Governor Approves 6-Week Abortion Ban
North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple has signed legislation that would ban most abortions if a fetal heartbeat can be detected, something that can happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. (via Associated Press)

Debate on School Security Ramps Up
Hoping to head off a push to expand police presence in the nation’s 100,000 public schools, a national civil rights group plans to issue an alternative this week to beefing up school security. The plan focuses on counselors, campus safety teams, secure entrances and communication. It does not support adding more armed police. (via The Washington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 15th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

New Early Warning System for the Brain Development of Babies
A new research technique, pioneered by Dr. Maria Angela Franceschini, will be published in JoVE (Journal of Visualized Experiments) on March 14th. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School have developed a non-invasive optical measurement system to monitor neonatal brain activity via cerebral metabolism and blood flow. (via Science Daily)

Celebrity Endorsements May Spur Kids’ Unhealthy Eating
Kids eat more of a food product that has been endorsed by a celebrity, researchers report in a new study. (via Fox News)

Lawsuit Says 2-year-old Ate Used Condom at Chicago McDonald’s
McDonald’s Corp has been sued by a woman who said her 2-year-old son ate a used condom he found in the play area of one of its restaurants in Chicago. (via Fox News)

Bill Clinton Delivers Keynote Address At Global Education And Skills Forum
Bill Clinton is delivering the keynote address at the inaugural Global Education and Skills Forum in Dubai. (via Huffington Post)

California Teacher Layoffs Decline Because Of Prop 30
After years of threatening to lay off tens of thousands of teachers due to budget shortfalls, California has some relatively good news: less than one-eighth of the number of teachers who got pink-slipped last year will be out of work next year. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Scott Walker’s Voucher Fight; School Safety Questions
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker first tangled with his state’s teachers union when he signed a bill that upended collective bargaining. (via Huffington Post)

Shedding New Light On Infant Brain Development
A new study by Columbia Engineering researchers finds that the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain. The paper, which the scientists say could change the way researchers study brain development in infants and children, is published in the February 18 Early Online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (via Science Daily)

Excessive TV in Childhood Linked to Long-Term Antisocial Behavior, New Zealand Study Shows
Children and adolescents who watch a lot of television are more likely to manifest antisocial and criminal behavior when they become adults, according to a new University of Otago, New Zealand, study published online in the journal Pediatrics. (via Science Daily)

Arkansas Senate Passes Bill to Ban Abortions After 20 Weeks
The Republican-controlled Arkansas state Senate approved a measure on Monday to ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy except in the case of rape, incest or to save the mother’s life. (via Reuters)

Sugar mist Makes Veggies More Palatable to Kids
A light mist of sugar could help the broccoli (and other veggies) go down, according to new research that tested ways to make vegetables more palatable for children. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Disabled Parents Often Lose Custody Of Children, Report Finds
A new study estimates that there is an 80% child removal rate for the 6.1 million parents with intellectual or psychiatric disabilities in the U.S. (via Huffington Post)

Fetal Alcohol Exposure Affects Brain Structure in Children
Children exposed to alcohol during fetal development exhibit changes in brain structure and metabolism that are visible using various imaging techniques, according to a new study. (via ScienceDaily)

Bounce House-Related Injuries on the Rise in U.S
The number of U.S. children hurt while using inflatable bouncers, such as bounce houses and moonwalks, is 15 times higher than in 1995, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

School Districts Brace for Cuts as Fiscal Crisis Looms
The automatic budget cuts and tax increases that will kick in next year could spawn another round of belt-tightening at public schools already battered by the recession and its aftermath. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Likely Basis of Birth Defect Causing Premature Skull Closure in Infants Identified
An international team of geneticists, pediatricians, surgeons and epidemiologists from 23 institutions across three continents has identified two areas of the human genome associated with the most common form of non-syndromic craniosynostosis ― premature closure of the bony plates of the skull. (via ScienceDaily)

Flame Retardants Used in Foam Upholstered Furniture and Other Products Linked to Neurodevelopmental Delays in Children
Prenatal and childhood exposure to flame retardant compounds are linked to poorer attention, fine motor coordination and IQ in school-aged children, a finding by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health that adds to growing health concerns over a chemical prevalent in U.S. households. (via ScienceDaily)

Study: Youngest Kids in Class May Be More Likely to Get ADHD Diagnosis
A new study from Iceland adds to existing evidence that kids are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder if they’re among the youngest in their grade at school. (via US Health News)

Study: One in 20 Youth has Used Steroids to Bulk Up
If the government is unable to resolve the looming debt crisis, federal education programs for elementary and high schools will lose a little over $2 billion starting next fall. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Preschoolers’ Counting Abilities Relate to Future Math Performance, Researcher Says
New research suggests reciting numbers is not enough to prepare children for math success in elementary school. The research indicates that counting, which requires assigning numerical values to objects in chronological order, is more important for helping preschoolers acquire math skills. (via ScienceDaily)

Malaria Vaccine a Letdown for Infants
An experimental malaria vaccine once thought promising is turning out to be a disappointment, with a new study showing it is only about 30 percent effective at protecting infants from the killer disease. (via NBC News)

Leftover Newborn Blood Samples Need Better Regulation, Ethicists Say
The tiny spots of blood left after routine tests on newborns could provide valuable information for researchers, but clear policies that govern their use are needed so that the samples are not destroyed or otherwise lost entirely, experts say. (via Fox News)

Iron, Omega-3s Tied to Different Effects on Kids’ Brains
For children with low stores of two brain-power nutrients, supplements may have different, and complex, effects, a new clinical trial suggests. (via Reuters)

Chocolate Nesquik Mix Recalled for Salmonella Risk
Chocolate giant Nestle USA is recalling some lots of its Nesquik chocolate powder drink mix because it might be contaminated with salmonella. (via NBC News)

Socioeconomic Status Linked to Childhood Peanut Allergy
Peanut allergies are rising among American children and one reason might be due to economic status. According to a new study, greater rates of peanut allergy are found in families with higher economic status. This supports the “hygiene hypothesis” of many allergists. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Doctors Announce FDA-Approved Trial to Cure Autism with Cord Blood
Researchers announced Tuesday the beginning of a FDA-approved clinical trial that uses umbilical cord blood stem cells to ‘cure’ autism. (via Fox News)

Ouch-Free Vaccines? They’re in The Works
Every parent dreads holding the baby still while a nurse or technician pushes a needle into a plump little thigh. But what if a little clear patch arrived by mail, one that could be stuck onto the child’s back and then would dissolve painlessly? (via MSNBC)

Music Lessons Linked to Lasting Brain Benefits
A study of 45 young adults found those with at least one year of childhood musical training had enhanced neurological responses to sound, a trait tied to improved learning and listening abilities. (via ABC)

More Hispanics Are in College, Report Finds
College enrollment has soared for Hispanic young adults in the last few years. Among Americans ages 18 to 24 with a high school diploma or equivalent, 46 percent of Hispanics were enrolled in college last year, up from 37 percent in 2008. (via New York Times)

Child Eating Disorders On the Rise
A study conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality showed that hospitalizations for eating disorders in children under 12 increased by 119% between 1999 and 2006. (via CNN)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Breast Cancer Charity Overstated Screening Benefits, Researchers Say
Researchers say Susan G. Komen for the Cure overstated the benefit mammograms have on survival rates of women with breast cancer. Komen’s messages stated 98 percent of women who get the screening tests survive at least five years, while 23 percent who do not get mammograms survive that long — a difference of 75 percentage points. (via NBC News)

New Pets May Help Autistic Kids Socially
Getting a pet may help children with autism to develop their social skills, if the furry friend is brought into the home when the child is about 5 years old, according to a new French study. The researchers discovered the children showed improvement in their abilities to share with others and to offer comfort. (via Fox News)

Hidden Dangers in Vitamins & Supplements?
According to a new report in Consumer Reports, vitamins and supplements could do more harm than good in some cases. Between 2007 and mid-April 2012, the FDA received more than 6,300 reports of serious adverse events linked to dietary supplements, including vitamins and herbs. (via CNN)

Disharmony in the Land of Nod
A new study suggests that even moderate levels of household conflict can alter basic brain function in infants, leaving them hypersensitive to negative emotions. Researchers found chronic family conflict made infants more likely to have abnormal brain responses to angry speech. (via Huffington Post)

Chile Bans Marketing of Toys in Children’s Food
A new law in Chile aims to take some fun out of fast-food by forcing McDonald’s, Burger King, KFC, and other restaurants to stop including toys and other goodies with children’s meals. The complaint also targets makers of cereal, popsicles, and other products that attract children with toys, crayons, or stickers. (via Associated Press)

Speaking Multiple Languages Can Influence Children’s Emotional Development
Researchers are investigating how using different languages to discuss and express emotions in a multilingual family might play an important role in children’s emotional development. They propose the particular language used when discussing and expressing emotion can have significant impacts on children’s emotional understanding, experience, and regulation. (via Science Daily)

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