Posts Tagged ‘ BPA ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Transgender Mississippi Student ‘Leah’ Supported by High School While Students Protest 
Students at a Batesville, Miss. high school are protesting because they believe that a transgender classmate is receiving “special treatment.” As WLOX 13 reports, over 30 students at South Panola High School have vocalized their opposition to a transgender girl identified only as Leah, who has been allowed to wear female clothing. (via Huffington Post)

Zero Degrees? Time for Baby’s Outdoor Nap
American parents may think they’ve got the naptime drill down, ensuring that their infant is on her back with no loose covers or pillows, possibly in a sleep sack if it’s chilly. But Nordic parents add one element to the mix: fresh air, even in winter. (via Fox News)

BPA Exposure Linked to Asthma in Kids
The list of adverse health effects from BPA exposure continues to grow. Bisphenol A, or BPA, is commonly used to line food and beverage cans, and helps to keep plastics flexible, but studies suggest the compound can leach into the foods we eat. (via TIME)

No Clear Benefits for Kids’ Blood Pressure Checks
There’s no evidence that checking kids’ and teens’ blood pressure – and treating them if it’s high – can reduce their heart risks in adulthood, according to a new analysis. (via Reuters)

Eating Junk Food While Pregnant May Make Your Child a Junk Food Addict
Here’s another reason why a healthy diet during pregnancy is critical to the future health of your children: New research published in the March 2013 issue of The FASEB Journal, suggests that pregnant mothers who consume junk food actually cause changes in the development of the opioid signaling pathway in the brains of their unborn children. (via Science Daily)

Action Video Games Boost Reading Skills of Children with Dyslexia Study Suggests
Much to the chagrin of parents who think their kids should spend less time playing video games and more time studying, time spent playing action video games can actually make dyslexic children read better. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Kids on “The Biggest Loser”: Is It Exploitation?
One of the most popular shows on TV, The Biggest Loser, debuted its 14th season on January 6 featuring a new kind of contestant: children.  (via Take Part)

Gates Foundation MET Report: Teacher Observation Less Reliable Than Test Scores
A few years ago, Bill Gates decided to learn more about whether a teacher’s effect on student learning could be measured. For the first time, the randomized trial shows that teachers who perform well with one group of students, on average, perform at the same levels with different groups of kids.. (via Huffington Post)

Review Questions Blood Pressure Tests for Kids
Despite long-standing recommendations that doctors check children’s blood pressure at every office visit, a new review of research says there is not enough evidence to support that guideline. (via Reuters)

Record Number of Misconduct Complaints Are Made Against City School Employees
A record number of allegations of wrongdoing against teachers and other Department of Education workers were received last year by the office that investigates misconduct in New York City schools, according to a report released on Tuesday. (via New York Times)

More Health Harms for Children Exposed to BPA
The latest study shows the compound found in plastic and food packaging can put youngsters at risk for future heart disease. (via TIME)

Chicago Faulted on Learning Disabilities
When Rashaan Payne was 2 years old, his pediatrician noticed that he was not talking at the level of most children his age. After autism was diagnosed, Rashaan began receiving speech therapy once a week at his home on the South Side of Chicago, paid for by the federal and state governments. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Puberty Before Age 10: A New ‘Normal’?
What science tells us about the incredible shrinking childhood.

Outgrowing Autism? Study Looks at Why Some Kids ‘Bloom’
About 10 percent of children who are severely affected by autism at age 3 seem to have “bloomed” by age 8, leaving behind many of the condition’s crippling deficits, a new study shows.

FDA Says it Will Deny Request to Ban BPA
The Food and Drug Administration announced Friday it will deny the National Resources Defense Council’s petition asking it to prohibit the use of bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, in products manufactured in the United States.

Is Sugar Toxic?
Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports on new research showing that beyond weight gain, sugar can take a serious toll on your health, worsening conditions ranging from heart disease to cancer.

You Want Me to Sign WHAT Before Your Kid’s Party?
Sure, you expect to sign a waiver before your kid goes rock-climbing. But a backyard birthday party? More parents are requiring legal sign-off before basic activities like parties and play dates.

Mattel to Make Bald Barbie
Following an ongoing campaign on Facebook for Mattel to add a bald Barbie to its line-up, the company said it will create a bald friend of Barbie starting next year.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 24th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Tough New York Private Schools Try to Lighten Load
Some of New York City’s most competitive high schools, like Dalton, Trinity and Horace Mann, are working to address student stress.

BPA Exposure in Womb Linked to Behavioral Woes in Girls
Girls who are exposed to high levels of bisphenol A (BPA) while in their mother’s womb may be more likely to show signs of behavioral and emotional problems as toddlers, new research finds.

U.S. Panel Urges ‘Energy Star’ Nutrition Ratings for Food Labels
Taking a cue from the Energy Star ratings on the front of household appliances, a panel of experts is recommending that a similarly easy-to-read system appear on every packaged food item in American grocery stores so busy consumers can glean nutritional info at a glance.

Educating New Parents Cuts Shaken Baby Syndrome
A new study in the journal Pediatrics finds that when a simple education program was implemented, hospitals in New York State’s Hudson Valley were able to reduce shaken baby syndrome cases in their hospitals by 75 percent.

New Barbie Has Pink Hair and Tattoos, and Some Parents Aren’t Happy
Brought to you by the Italian-based, Japanese-inspired brand Tokidoki, this new edgy Barbie has a chin-length pink bob, punk-style clothing and tattoos running down her arm and around her collarbone.

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

What baby eats in first days may impact health later
The food babies eat during their first days of life may have a long-term impact on their health, a new study suggests. The results of the research show babies who are breast-fed have lower blood pressure when they are three years old compared with babies who are given formula with high amounts of protein. In addition, breast-fed babies also had slightly bigger heads than those who were fed a low-protein formula. (MSNBC)

Prenatal BPA Exposure Tied to Wheezing in Kids
Mothers who are exposed to high amounts of the controversial but highly prevalent chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in everything from canned foods and plastics to dental products and credit card receipts, have children with an increased risk of wheezing, according to a new study. (Fox News)

Young mom versus old mom: Which is really better?
My family is a little unusual – I have a 14-year-old and a 14-month old, with a 2½-year-old sandwiched in between. Parenting all three requires some serious multi-tasking. It also provides a personal window into the young mom versus older mom debate. Is it better to have kids in your 20s, when you have lots of energy, or in your 30s or 40s, when you’re more settled? (Today.com)

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

Even kids who play sports don’t exercise enough
On average, kids enrolled in soccer, baseball or softball exercised heavily for only 45 minutes during practice — 15 minutes less than the amount recommended by national guidelines. (MSNBC)

A winter birthday may affect your biological clock
The finding is the first of its kind in mammals, and could explain why people born in the winter are at higher risk for mental health disorders including bipolar depression, schizophrenia and seasonal affective disorder. (MSNBC)

Study links cell phones to child misbehavior
Researchers studying the health effects of cellphones say they have found evidence that when pregnant women use them regularly, their children are more likely to have behavioral problems. (MSNBC)

Study finds bisphenol A (BPA) on money
A new report says Bisphenol A (BPA), the controversial hormone disrupting chemical widely used in plastics, is turning up in an unlikely place–the money in your wallet. (Paging Dr. Gupta)

Consumers Union raises concerns about mercury in tuna
Younger women and children should limit the amount of tuna they eat and pregnant women should not eat tuna at all, because of mercury levels found in the canned and packaged fish, says  new report in the January 2011 issue of Consumer Reports. (Paging Dr. Gupta)

Children’s Hospitals Lose Some Drug Discounts
In an unintended consequence of the new health care law, drug companies have begun notifying children’s hospitals around the country that they no longer qualify for large discounts on drugs used to treat rare medical conditions. (New York Times)

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupSledding can send kids slip-sliding into injury, study says
Whether they’re gliding on plain plastic saucers or high-tech snow tubes, children and teens on sleds account for at least 20,820 injuries in the United States each year, according to a first-ever analysis of U.S. emergency room reports. (MSNBC)

Brain scan ‘best thing so far’ for detecting autism
The way autism is diagnosed could become less subjective by using a brain-imaging-based test that is being developed by researchers and that, in early trials, was 94 percent accurate. Autism is now diagnosed through a symptom-based test: A health-care provider observes a patient for the characteristics outlined in the psychology reference book, “The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV.” (MSNBC)

Women exposed to BPA may have trouble getting pregnant
Mice that were exposed to tiny amounts of the common chemical in the womb and shortly after birth had no problems getting pregnant early in their reproductive lives, the study found. But the animals were less likely to get pregnant as they aged compared to animals that had not been exposed to BPA, and they gave birth to smaller litters as time wore on. (MSNBC)

Breast test furor fades but anger lingers
Patients, physicians and major medical organizations fought back (“I want my mammograms!”) when the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that women with average breast cancer risk begin biannual mammograms at 50. The American Cancer Society, the American College of Radiology (although some would argue that radiologists have financial incentive in frequent screenings) and other organizations have continued to support women getting yearly mammograms from 40 onward. (CNN)
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Do You Microwave Your Plastic Containers?

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

I used to. I’ve been known to throw them in the dishwasher, too. I’ve slathered my children with heavily fragranced shampoos and lotions. I’ve served my family tons of canned foods.

But over the past year, and particularly since I started working here, I’ve cut back on those habits, or eliminated them altogether. Read our story about the toxins that are all around us, and you may very well do the same.

One thing I really appreciate about this article is that it leaves you feeling empowered, not hopelessly terrified. Yes, toxic chemicals are lurking everywhere. But you can avoid them, as we outline for you in the piece. And you can speak out against dangerous chemicals being used in the products that we all come in contact with every single day. Major reform is underway, in the form of the Toxic Chemicals Safety Act of 2010, a bill that was introduced late last month. It’ll obviously take a long time to truly overhaul our current system, but until them, it’s comforting to know that you can make a difference in your own home.

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