Posts Tagged ‘ BMI ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Job Losses Persist for the Less-Educated
After suffering the largest share of job losses in the recession, Americans with no more than a high school education have continued to lose jobs during the sputtering recovery while better-educated people have gained millions of jobs, according to a Georgetown University study. (via New York Times)

Blood Type Might Be a Clue to Heart Disease Risk
People who have blood types A, B, or AB have a slightly higher risk of heart disease compared to those with type O, the most common kind, according to research released Tuesday. (via Associated Press)

U.S. Kids Downing More Diet Drinks
The number of U.S. children who drink sugar-free beverages has doubled in the past decade, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Chemical in Antibacterical Soap Weakens Muscle Function
A new study questions the safety of triclosan, a common chemical in antibacterial products like soap, toothpaste and mouthwash. (via Time)

Children’s Self Control is Associated with Their Body Mass Index as Adults
A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics finds that delaying gratification longer at 4 years of age is associated with having a lower body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

TSA Rolling Out New Screening Procedures for Children
Responding to the uproar over physical searches of children, the Transportation Security Administration is rolling out new procedures that should reduce, although not eliminate, the number of times children are patted down at airport checkpoints.

Could Parents Lose the Right to Know Baby’s Gender?
A Council of Europe committee has drafted a resolution that could keep parents-to-be in the dark concerning the gender of the fetus, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Michigan to Require BMI Reports on Kids
Gov. Rick Snyder plans to direct doctors in Michigan to begin monitoring the body weight of their young patients and provide the data to a state registry in one of the most extensive government efforts to address the growing problem of pediatric obesity, the Associated Press has learned.

In Ohio, Obama Emphasizes School Upgrades as Part of Jobs Proposal
In a spirited visit to a high school in Columbus, President Obama promoted the idea of school modernization leading to lower unemployment.

Brazil Census: Nearly 43,000 Kids Under 14 Married
Census figures from 2010 show that nearly 43,000 children under 14 years of age are living with a partner in Brazil in defiance of laws forbidding these unions.

Does Your Child Have a School Nurse?
Nurses are handling bigger caseloads, experts say, while students’ medical needs are becoming more complex.

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 1st, 2010

IPad opens world to a disabled boy: Owen Cain, seven years old, has suffered from a debilitating motor-neuron disease since infancy. By chance, Owen gravitated toward his nurse’s IPad and instantly was able to use it without complication.   This is the first device that has enabled Owen and many others disabled young ones to use actively without assistance. [New York Times]

Pregnancy less likely when dad is over weight: Dr. Zaher Merhi, New York, concluded that among couples using assisted reproductive technology the male’s weight does influence the outcome.  Every 5-unit increase in the father’s BMI was associated with a 28 percent decrease in the likelihood of clinical pregnancy. [ABC News]

Obama’s administration’s sex-ed program criticized by both sides of abstinence debate: After declining for years the teen pregnancy rate has increased again.  $110 million dollar campaign enacted on Obama’s behalf has been invested to support a range of safe sex programs through out the country. Obama has promised to put scientific evidence before political ideology. [Washington Post]

Train the brain: using neurofeedback to treat ADHD: Neurofeedback is an alternative type of therapy intended to keep the brain calm and focused.  Although it is still scientifically unproved, expensive, and time consuming there is growing evidence that it can help. [NPR]

Analyzing eggs and their genetic junk offers clues to fertility: Brown University researchers eventually hope to be able to analyze eggs’ mRNA to determine if it’s normal or abnormal. If something’s askew in a particular egg’s polar body, it could be a biologic clue indicating that egg isn’t likely to successfully fertilize. This could later lead to new forms of contraception and new ways of detecting prime eggs to fertilize. [Time]

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