Posts Tagged ‘ blood type ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Job Losses Persist for the Less-Educated
After suffering the largest share of job losses in the recession, Americans with no more than a high school education have continued to lose jobs during the sputtering recovery while better-educated people have gained millions of jobs, according to a Georgetown University study. (via New York Times)

Blood Type Might Be a Clue to Heart Disease Risk
People who have blood types A, B, or AB have a slightly higher risk of heart disease compared to those with type O, the most common kind, according to research released Tuesday. (via Associated Press)

U.S. Kids Downing More Diet Drinks
The number of U.S. children who drink sugar-free beverages has doubled in the past decade, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Chemical in Antibacterical Soap Weakens Muscle Function
A new study questions the safety of triclosan, a common chemical in antibacterial products like soap, toothpaste and mouthwash. (via Time)

Children’s Self Control is Associated with Their Body Mass Index as Adults
A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics finds that delaying gratification longer at 4 years of age is associated with having a lower body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. (via Science Daily)

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Could Your Blood Type Keep You From Getting Pregnant?

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

Age, diet, weight, and lifestyle — we’re all aware of the different factors that affect fertility in women.

But blood type?

According to a new report from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, women with type O blood may have a tougher time trying to get pregnant.

The study, led by Edward Nejat of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, measured the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a substance that controls the ovaries’ production of eggs, in women under the age of 45 and found that those with type O blood were twice as likely to have FSH levels higher than 10— which means a low egg count — than women with other blood types. Nejat’s research did not conclude why this link between blood type and fertility exists.  [New Scientist]

What do you think: Is this just another study, or are you concerned about Nejat’s findings? Let us know in the comments!

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