Posts Tagged ‘ birth rates ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Vitamin D Doesn’t Actually Fight Off Colds, Study Says
Although vitamin D boosts the immune system, taking large doses of the nutrient does not appear to ward off colds, a new study from New Zealand says. (via My Health Daily News)

Docs Have Mixed Feelings on School Vaccinations
Colorado doctors mostly support local efforts to give kids their flu shots and other vaccines at school – but they also have misgivings, a new study shows. (via Reuters)

Birth Rate Down in US for 4th Year
U.S. births fell for the fourth year in a row, the government reported Wednesday, with experts calling it more proof that the weak economy has continued to dampen enthusiasm for having children. (via AP)

Children’s Bicycle Helmets Effective in Impact and Crush Tests, Study Suggests
Few bicyclists wear helmets regularly, and children are less inclined to wear helmets than adults: national estimates of helmet use among children range from only 15% to 25%. (via Science Daily)

U.S. Teen Drinking and Driving Rate Cut in Half in 20 Years
The percentage of U.S. high school students who drink and drive has dropped by more than half in two decades, in part due to tougher laws against driving under the influence of alcohol, federal health officials said on Tuesday. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, July 27th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Reclaim Your Wife: How An Ad For A Baby Bottle Went Very Wrong
In fewer than 280 characters, in other words, Bittylab pressed some of the hottest buttons in parenting. First, it stepped in the middle of the breast vs. bottle debate, by suggesting that any bottle — even one filled with expressed breast milk — could take the place of the real thing. Second, it fueled the fight over whether any man who does feel “replaced” by his nursing child is jerk, or simply an average guy.
(via Huffington Post)

Brain Sees Men as Whole, Women as Parts
Women are more likely to be picked apart by the brain and seen as parts rather than a whole, according to research in the European Journal of Social Psychology. Men, on the other hand, are processed as a whole rather than the sum of their parts.
(via MSNBC)

Medicaid Expansion May Lower Death Rates, Study Says
Into the maelstrom of debate over whether Medicaid should cover more people comes a new study by Harvard researchers who found that when states expanded their Medicaid programs and gave more poor people health insurance, fewer people died. (via NY Times)

Big Uptick in Scheduled Births Before Due Dates, Aussie Study Finds
Expectant mothers in Australia are increasingly having their babies’ births scheduled weeks before their due date, according to a new study. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Survival Rates for Premies Are Better Than Previously Reported
Premature babies are more likely to survive when they are born in high-level neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) than in hospitals without such facilities. Pediatric researchers who analyzed more than 1.3 million premature births over a 10-year span found that the survival benefits applied not only to extremely preterm babies, but also to moderately preterm newborns. (via Science Daily)

Severely Obese Babies: Hearts Already in Danger
Heart disease is normally associated with middle age, but the early warning signs were detected in children between the ages of two and 12. Two-thirds of the 307 children studied had a least one early symptom such as high blood pressure. (via BBC)

Social Deprivation Has a Measurable Effect On Brain Growth
Severe psychological and physical neglect produces measurable changes in children’s brains, finds a study led by Boston Children’s Hospital. But the study also suggests that positive interventions can partially reverse these changes. (via Science Daily)

After 30 Years, Unintended Birth Rate Still Almost 40 Percent
About 37 percent of births in the United States are the result of unintended pregnancies, a proportion that has remained fairly steady since 1982, according to new research from the National Center for Health Statistics, a branch of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (via ABC)

Childhood Obesity Linked to Cancer Risk
According to the American Heart Association, one in three children and teenagers are now considered overweight or obese. There is a growing recognition of health problems associated with extra pounds, including the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and joint and muscle pain. (via Science Daily)

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup10 Controversial Toys That Won’t Be On This Year’s Wish Lists
Ten toys that reached the market over the past few years that probably never should have seen the light of day. [Wallet Pop]

Diaper Research Tracks Infant Estrogen Levels
The method, previously used in nonhuman primates, will allow researchers to learn more about the association between estrogen levels in human infants and their long-term reproductive development as well as the development of sex-specific behaviors, such as toy preference or cognitive differences. What’s more, the method will also allow researchers to look at how early disruption of the endocrine system affects long-term maturation, a growing concern among researchers and physicians. [Medical News Today]

Watch Video: The U.S. Gets Low Marks for Preemie Birth Rates [MSNBC]

Highlighting Gender Promotes Stereotyped Views In Preschoolers
In many preschool classrooms, gender is very noticeable – think of the greeting, “Good morning, boys and girls” or the instruction, “Girls line up on this side, boys on that.” A new study has found that when teachers call attention to gender in these simple ways, children are more likely to express stereotyped views of what activities are appropriate for boys and girls, and which gender they prefer to play with. [Medical News Today]

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