Posts Tagged ‘ birth defects ’

Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupUnder Pressure, Firm Shutters Line That Made Tainted Wipes
A Wisconsin medical supplier that made millions of recalled alcohol prep products now blamed for serious infections and at least one death is shutting down the line that produces the wipes — at least for now. But the parents of two children harmed by infections blamed on contaminated Triad products said the move is too little, too late, and raises more questions about why government regulators haven’t taken stronger action against the firm. [MSNBC]

Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk
Women in the study who drank more than a cup of coffee a day had a 22% to 25% lower risk of stroke than those who drank less, according to findings reported Thursday in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, behind heart disease and cancer. The findings add to the growing body of research showing coffee appears to have hidden health perks. A study done by Larsson in 2008 on men who drank coffee or tea had similar results. One of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants that improve health. Other research has suggested coffee can help prevent cognitive decline and can boost vision and heart health. It is also associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. [USA Today]

Dog Kisses: Is  It Safe to Smooch with a Pet?
According to an article in WebMd, not even doctors and veterinarians agree about kissing a dog on the lips or vice versa. Thinking that dog’s tongue is clean is off base, says veterinarian William Craig, but don’t stop there. “Dog spit isn’t chemically cleansing. It turns out that it’s the dog’s rough tongue that helps to physically remove contaminants from an open wound” and likely the reason why many wounds do not get infected,” he told Pawnation. Craig adds “people tend to brush their teeth regularly and rinse with mouthwash. Dogs tend to lick themselves and eat things off the ground.” “Humans and dogs have different bacteria in their mouths,” explains Nelle Wyatt, a veterinary technician at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center. “Not all of the bacteria are capable of causing disease in the other species.” [USA Today]

Boy Toddlers Need Extra Help Dealing With Negative Emotions, Experts Urge
The way you react to your two-year-old’s temper tantrums or clinginess may lead to anxiety, withdrawal and behavior problems down the road, and the effect is more pronounced if the child is a boy who often displays such negative emotions as anger and social fearfulness, reports a new University of Illinois study. [Science Daily]

Passive Smoking Increases Risk of Stillbirth and Birth Defects, Study Suggests
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. [Science Daily]

Teacher Who Twice Threw a Chair at 7th-Grader Tries to Clear Her Name
A longtime teacher at a Joliet junior high who last year “snapped” and twice threw a chair at a seventh-grade boy, striking him once in the head, is trying to clear her record so she can teach again. After Filak tried to get the boy to do his work, he instead told her to “leave me alone, fool,” witnesses said, according to a judge’s ruling that found the chair-throwing incident was child abuse. [Chicago Tribune]

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Bret Baier of FoxNews on Congenital Heart Defects

Monday, February 21st, 2011

bret-baier-paulFebruary is also American Heart Month and Fox News anchor Bret Baier of Special Report with Bret Baier spoke to Parents.com recently about parenting a son with congenital heart disease.  At 3-years-old, Paul was born with five congenital heart defects and has already underwent two surgeries.    Even though congenital heart defects are a common birth defect, they are rarely detected.  Read excerpts from Baier’s interview below:

Congenital heart disease isn’t necessarily inherited — what are some methods of early detection? What are signs of a congenital heart defect? Are there ways to prevent it?

When you start talking about congenital heart defects, it’s amazing how common they are. I think one in 150 children has some sort of congenital heart defect and, out of those, half of them need surgery in the first year. Now, a lot of this can be detected by measuring the oxygen level of your blood. If there were a mandated check at hospitals when babies are born, this could be detected early.

What advice do you have for parents who need support in raising children with life-threatening conditions, defects or diseases? What suggestions do you have for promoting awareness of this issue?

Congenital heart defects are under the radar, unfortunately, especially regarding children. There is no awareness about how prevalent it is. Just the other day, the president signed the American Heart Month proclamation, and it does good things concerning heart disease, but it doesn’t deal with heart defects. The key thing is to work with your doctor, have confidence in what’s happening, and have family and friends rally around you. We got through our experience because of all the people that helped out. You realize how important family and friends can be.

Read the full interview with Bret Baier

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A Great Resolution: March for Babies!

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Let me guess: If you made a resolution this year, it involved getting in shape, or becoming more active, or being more charitable, or all of the above (that’s what my list looks like, anyway!). Here’s a way to work on all three goals: Sign up for the March of Dimes March for Babies. This annual event, held in the last weekend in April, raises money for the March of Dimes’ primary missions: to support research on preventing and helping babies born prematurely, or with birth defects, as well as to assist families whose babies are in intensive care, among other worthy causes.

This year’s walk will take place in more than 900 communities on Saturday, April 30, and Sunday, May 1. Every walk is a different length, ranging from three to six miles, so no matter what kind of shape you might be in now, you should have no problem completing it. Find the walk closest to your town by clicking here, and then sign up today. Good luck!

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

GoodBlog imageEven the sickest babies benefit from breast-feeding: Pediatric researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia describe a successful program in which nurses helped mothers attain high rates of breast-feeding in very sick babies–newborns with complex birth defects requiring surgery and intensive care. [Medical News Today]

Breakthrough in understanding life-threatening childhood liver disease: Until now, doctors weren’t sure what caused biliary atresia, which is important to know in order to develop better treatments. The CU researchers propose that an infection late in the third trimester of pregnancy or soon after birth initiates the bile duct injury. [Medical News Today]

Cardiac wakeup call for kids: “Sleep disorders in kids are on the increase. They are marching hand in hand with other increasing cardiovascular risk factors such as overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, a poor diet, and high levels of unhealthy cholesterol,” Dr. McCrindle today told the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2010, co-hosted by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.[Medical News Today]

Candidates use children to make final pitch: Candidates who have spent months and millions of dollars slugging it out are replacing attacks ads with gauzy images designed to leave voters with a warm and fuzzy feeling. And what better way to do that than with children? [Washington Post]

Breast milk study furthers understanding of critical ingredients: Ask someone in the know to list the substances in breast milk that make it the ideal food for newborns and you may hear about proteins that guard against infection, fats that aid in the development of the nervous system and carbohydrates that promote the growth of healthy bacteria. But, you may not hear too much about the nitrite and nitrate in breast milk and their contributions to developing gastrointestinal, immune and cardiovascular systems. [Science Daily]

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