Posts Tagged ‘ birth defects ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

IVF Linked to More Birth Defects
In vitro fertilization (IVF) is responsible for creating thousands of happy families, but the latest research highlights some of the potential long term risks of the procedure. (via Time)

U.S. Boys Experiencing Early Onset of Puberty
A study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has documented that boys in the U.S. are experiencing the onset of puberty six months to two years earlier than reported in previous research. (via Science Daily)

Pfizer to Buy Maker of Attention-Deficit Drug for $255 Million
Pfizer Inc said it would buy privately held NextWave Pharmaceuticals for $255 million, gaining access to the company’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug, the first once-daily liquid medicine approved to treat the condition in the United States. (via Reuters)

Simpler Colon Screen May be Enough for Many Women: Study
(Reuters) – Women younger than 70 have a relatively low risk of abnormal growth in the upper part of the colon – suggesting, U.S. researchers say, that many women can opt for less invasive colon cancer screening. (via Reuters)

Troubled Teens Could Benefit from Online Access to Health Records, Say Researchers
Teens who get in trouble with the law could particularly benefit from online health records because they generally have worse health than other adolescents — and no one keeping track of the health care they do receive. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Exposure to Traffic Air Pollution in Infancy Impairs Lung Function in Children
Exposure to ambient air pollution from traffic during infancy is associated with lung function deficits in children up to eight years of age, particularly among children sensitized to common allergens, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

Drug Shortage Led to Spike in Kids’ Infections
When there was a shortage of a drug used to prevent IV-related infections in kids, the frequency of those infections increased almost ten-fold at one hospital, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

No Clear Link Between Organic Food, Birth Defect
Baby boys whose moms ate organic during pregnancy do not seem to have a lower risk of a birth defect of the penis, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Preemies from Low-Income Families at High Risk for Dangerous Brain Bleeds
Babies born prematurely to low-income parents have a disproportionately high risk for developing dangerous brain bleeds that require multiple surgeries and extensive follow-up, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Faster DNA Testing for NICU Babies Means More Accurate Diagnoses
A new genetic test can rapidly screen the DNA of babies in intensive care for about 3,500 diseases. (via Time)

New Child-Proof Spray Bottle Designed to Prevent Chemical Injuries
A new type of spray bottle could prevent thousands of chemical injuries that occur yearly when children get their hands on household cleaners and accidentally spray themselves. (via MyHealthNewsDaily)

Mom’s Blood Pressure May Affect Baby’s IQ
Hypertension isn’t just risky for a pregnant woman, as it can also have lasting consequences for a child’s cognitive ability, a new study suggests. (via CNN)

Do Exercise Programs Help Children Stay Fit?
A new review of the outcomes of a wide range of different physical activity interventions for young people finds that the programs almost never increase overall daily physical activity. (via New York Times)

Common Solvents Tied to Birth Defects
Pregnant women with frequent exposure to solvents at work may be at higher risk of having babies with birth defects, French researchers have found. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

FDA: BPA Banned in Baby Bottles
The federal government announced Tuesday that baby bottles and sippy cups can no longer contain the controversial chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA. The American Chemistry Council asked the FDA to phase out rules allowing BPA in those products in October. (via Associated Press)

Sports Promote Healthy Weight in Teenagers
New findings published in the journal Pediatrics are among the first to demonstrate that walking or riding a bike to school actually has an impact on weight gain among high school students. Also, playing on at least one high school sports team, but preferably two or more, can significantly lower the likelihood of obesity in teens. (via NY Times)

Dads’ Jobs Linked to Birth Defect Risks
Certain jobs held by men in the months before they conceive a child may increase the risk of birth defects, a new study suggests. Many of these occupations included environments where workers are commonly exposed to solvents. (via MSNBC)

Mothers Who Have Heavier Babies May Be at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer, Study Finds
A hefty birth weight may put mothers at more than twice the risk of breast cancer compared with a woman who had a comparatively smaller baby, according to preliminary data from two studies, published Tuesday in the journal PLoS One. (via CNN)

Autism Survey for Parents May Catch Disorder Early
A survey, called The First Year Inventory, given to parents when their children are 1 year old may help identify kids at risk of autism, a new study suggests. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Mother’s Blood Shows Birth Defects in Fetal DNA
Researchers said they were able to sequence the entire genome of a fetus using only a blood sample from the mother, an advance in the effort to find noninvasive ways for expectant parents to determine if their babies will be born with genetic conditions. (via Fox News)

Smoking Mothers’ Embryos ‘Grow More Slowly’
French academics in an IVF clinic took regular pictures of an egg from the moment it was fertilized until it was ready to be implanted into the mother. At all stages of development, embryos from smokers were consistently a couple of hours behind, a study showed. (via BBC News)

Too Much Coffee Could Hurt Women’s Chances of IVF Success
Women who drank five or more cups of coffee a day were about 50% less likely to get pregnant through in-vitro fertilization than non-drinkers, according to a recent Danish study. The authors noted it was “comparable to the detrimental effect of smoking.” (via TIME)

Company Studying OxyContin’s Effect in Children
The maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin confirms that a clinical trial is currently underway to measure the opioid’s effects in children. Although doctors can prescribe OxyContin off-label to pediatric patients, the drug — which was overwhelmingly tested in adults — is not approved for use in children by the Food and Drug Administration. (via CNN)

Premature Birth May Raise Risk for Mental Illness, Study Reports
Young adults born very premature — at less than 32 weeks’ gestation — were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for schizophrenia or delusional disorders, almost three times as likely for major depression, and more than seven times as likely for bipolar illness. (via NY Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

In Choosing a Sperm Donor, a Roll of the Genetic Dice
In households across the country, children conceived with donated sperm are struggling with serious genetic conditions inherited from men they have never met.

Birth-Defect Risk Seen in Assisted Conception
An Australian survey of about 300,000 pregnancies, with more than 6,000 resulting from fertility treatments, found that treatment was associated with a 28 percent greater risk for birth defects.

Watching TV Linked to Poor Diet in Students
A national survey of more than 12,000 students in grades 5 to 10 has found that television viewing is associated not only with unhealthy snacking while watching, but also with unhealthy eating at all times.

Play Baseball Against a Girl? Arizona School Forfeits Game Instead
A Phoenix Catholic school, Our Lady of Sorrows, decided it would rather lose a baseball championship than play against a team with a girl.

First Lady Has Plan to Get Kids Involved in Sports
The first lady is partnering with the U.S. Olympic Committee, the Partnership for a Healthier America, U.S. Paralympics and numerous national governing bodies that have pledged their time and resources toward introducing young people to their sports over the course of the summer.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: 2011 Was Worst Measles Year in U.S. in 15 Years
Last year was the worst year for measles in the U.S. in 15 years, health officials said Thursday.

Birth Defects a Third More Common in IVF Babies
Babies conceived through certain fertility treatment techniques are about one-third more likely to have a birth defect than babies conceived without any extra help from technology, according to a review of several dozen studies.

TV On in the Background? It’s Still Bad for Kids
Too much television can be detrimental for kids’ development, even when they’re not plopped directly in front of the screen.

Domestic Violence May Stunt Babies’ Intellectual Growth
A longitudinal study uncovers the lifelong consequences of child abuse and exposure to interpersonal conflict in the first two years of life.

Controversial Ad Uses Breast-Feeding to Sell Cookies
The latest in the breast-feeding wars comes all the way from South Korea and involves the epitome of American snacktime: the Oreo cookie.

Working Moms’ Challenges: Paid Leave, Child Care
The past week’s political firestorm in the presidential race focused on stay-at-home moms, but two-thirds of women with young children now work. What some feel is being lost in the political debate are the challenges they face in the workplace.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, December 9th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Obama Backs Restrictions on Morning-After Pill
President Obama said Thursday that he supported the Department of Health and Human Services overruling an FDA decision to allow an emergency morning-after contraceptive pill to be sold to girls younger than 17 without a prescription.

We Are the Median: Carefully Budgeting for Food, Health Care Costs
A family is living with a very careful budget – on the nation’s median income of about $50,000 a year.

Study: Abortion Doesn’t Raise Mental Illness Risk
Abortion does not increase a woman’s chance of developing mental health problems, according to the largest study ever to investigate the issue.

To Keep Marriage Healthy When Baby Comes, Share Housework
A survey identifies traits, like generosity, that help couples buck the trend toward marital discord once baby arrives.

U.S. to Test Therapy to Prevent Birth Defects
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is set to launch a large trial using antibodies to test a way to prevent birth defects, such as blindness and deafness, caused by mothers passing a common virus to their unborn babies.

The Teenage Babysitter, Replaced by Older Pros
Despite the cost, some parents are turning to career nannies, who come with references and experience, rather than the 15-year-old down the street, even if the need is for just a few hours on a weekend night.

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