Posts Tagged ‘ Behavior ’

Preliminary Results from Survey on Autism and Wandering

Friday, April 22nd, 2011

Earlier this month, we urged parents to participate in a survey about autism sponsored by the Interactive Autism Network.  The survey aimed to study and understand wandering behavior among children and adults with autism.

In just three weeks, the Interactive Autism Network has received 856  survey participants, primarily parents with children who are autistic.  Preliminary data from the survey, focusing just on children, was released this week in the report, ”IAN Research Report: Elopement and Wandering.”  IAN discovered that about 50% of kids with autism attempted to wander off between the ages of 4 to 10 and about 30% continued to wander between ages 7 to 10.  Half of the parents had kids who wandered off long enough to cause significant worry and concern.  Plus, about 35% of the kids were  rarely able to communicate their name, address, or phone number.  

The survey also reported 58% of the parents ranked wandering as the most stressful behavior related to autism, and 64% were prevented from pursuing family activities because of the wandering.  Only 19% of the parents have  received guidance from a psychologist or mental health professional while only 14% have received guidance from a pediatrician or physician.

A high number of parents (67%) also reported they didn’t see any seasonal pattern with wandering, and the top 5 reasons (in order) they believed wandering happened was because their kids: enjoyed exploring, liked to visit a favorite place, wanted to escape demands and anxieties, wanted to pursue a special topic, and wanted to escape sensory discomforts.  Read the full report of the preliminary results at Interactive Autism Network.

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Participate in a National Survey About Autism and Wandering

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

The Interactive Autism Network, an online project that aims to collect data about autism spectrum disorder (ASD), recently launched the first nationwide survey to study the experience of wandering (or elopement, bolting, and escaping) among people with autism. 

Individuals with autism have a higher tendency to wander for extensive amounts of time, putting them at risk for trauma, injury, or death.  “Although similar behavior has been studied in Alzheimer’s disease and autism advocates identify elopement as a top priority, virtually no research has been conducted on this phenomenon in ASD,” states Dr. Paul Law, Director of the IAN Project at the Kennedy Krieger Institute.  Recently, 4-year-old Jackson Kastner drowned after wandering away from his home in Monroe County, MI, while four years ago, a 7-year-old boy wandered out of his classroom and ended up at a four-lane highway.  Despite being returned to school safe and sound, poor school supervision continues and he still wanders out of the classroom today.

To understand this wandering behavior and determine who is at risk, IAN is asking all families in the U.S. autism community to participate in the survey, which is funded by the Autism Research Institute, Autism Science Foundation, Autism Speaks, and Global Autism Collaboration.  IAN is asking for information  from families with children and dependent adults who either do or do not wander. To take part in the survey, you must register online at www.ianresearch.org.  If the necessary sample size for the survey is reached, preliminary data might be available on April 20, 2011.

The survey will help researchers answer important questions:

  • How often do individuals with ASD attempt to elope? How often do they succeed? Under what circumstances?
  • Which individuals with ASD are most at risk? At what age?
  • What burden do efforts to thwart elopement behavior place on caregivers?
  • What can be done to protect individuals with ASD and support their families?

If you have a child with autism, please consider taking part in this survey.

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupUnder Pressure, Firm Shutters Line That Made Tainted Wipes
A Wisconsin medical supplier that made millions of recalled alcohol prep products now blamed for serious infections and at least one death is shutting down the line that produces the wipes — at least for now. But the parents of two children harmed by infections blamed on contaminated Triad products said the move is too little, too late, and raises more questions about why government regulators haven’t taken stronger action against the firm. [MSNBC]

Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk
Women in the study who drank more than a cup of coffee a day had a 22% to 25% lower risk of stroke than those who drank less, according to findings reported Thursday in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, behind heart disease and cancer. The findings add to the growing body of research showing coffee appears to have hidden health perks. A study done by Larsson in 2008 on men who drank coffee or tea had similar results. One of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants that improve health. Other research has suggested coffee can help prevent cognitive decline and can boost vision and heart health. It is also associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. [USA Today]

Dog Kisses: Is  It Safe to Smooch with a Pet?
According to an article in WebMd, not even doctors and veterinarians agree about kissing a dog on the lips or vice versa. Thinking that dog’s tongue is clean is off base, says veterinarian William Craig, but don’t stop there. “Dog spit isn’t chemically cleansing. It turns out that it’s the dog’s rough tongue that helps to physically remove contaminants from an open wound” and likely the reason why many wounds do not get infected,” he told Pawnation. Craig adds “people tend to brush their teeth regularly and rinse with mouthwash. Dogs tend to lick themselves and eat things off the ground.” “Humans and dogs have different bacteria in their mouths,” explains Nelle Wyatt, a veterinary technician at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center. “Not all of the bacteria are capable of causing disease in the other species.” [USA Today]

Boy Toddlers Need Extra Help Dealing With Negative Emotions, Experts Urge
The way you react to your two-year-old’s temper tantrums or clinginess may lead to anxiety, withdrawal and behavior problems down the road, and the effect is more pronounced if the child is a boy who often displays such negative emotions as anger and social fearfulness, reports a new University of Illinois study. [Science Daily]

Passive Smoking Increases Risk of Stillbirth and Birth Defects, Study Suggests
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. [Science Daily]

Teacher Who Twice Threw a Chair at 7th-Grader Tries to Clear Her Name
A longtime teacher at a Joliet junior high who last year “snapped” and twice threw a chair at a seventh-grade boy, striking him once in the head, is trying to clear her record so she can teach again. After Filak tried to get the boy to do his work, he instead told her to “leave me alone, fool,” witnesses said, according to a judge’s ruling that found the chair-throwing incident was child abuse. [Chicago Tribune]

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Is Hot Sauce Mother Blameless?

Friday, February 4th, 2011

hot-sauceThe latest update on hot sauce mama Jessica Beagley is her claim that Dr. Phil’s producers asked her to produce the video of hot sauce and cold showers.

In an AP article, Beagley’s attorney revealed that the mom originally filmed a video of her threatening  the children with cold showers, but no action was taken.  The producers wanted to see the actual discipline demonstrated on film, hence the more controversial video.   In defense, a spokesperson from Dr. Phil’s show said the producers asked that Beagley stop her discipline tactics after seeing the disturbing video.

Jezebel.com asks: “What’s worse — that they asked her, or that she agreed?  …Ultimately, the victim is Beagley’s son, who never had a choice about whether he’d be on TV in the first place.”

As a parent, would you have made the video knowing you might get a chance to appear on Dr. Phil’s show?

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Would You Discipline Your Child with Hot Sauce?

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

Jessica Beagley, who recently became known as the mother who forced her son to swallow hot sauce and take cold showers, was charged with misdemeanor child abuse today by a court in Anchorage, Alaska. 

Beagley first appeared on the “Mommy Confessions” episode of Dr. Phil in November 2010.  During the segment, she shared a video that her 10-year-old daughter taped of Beagley disciplining one of her 7-year-old twin sons with the above-mentioned tactics.  Even though she was not present in court, her team of lawyers pleaded “not guilty” on her behalf. 

While some support the hot sauce method, such as former “Facts of Life” start Lisa Whelchel who advocates it in her parenting book Creative Correction, the majority of parents who saw Beagley’s video were shocked and horrified at her discipline tactics.  A media firestorm has increased since November, causing parents to wonder how to discipline their children effectively. 

I’m reminded of a time when I was 4-years-old and I was still sucking my right thumb.  To get me to stop, my grandmother rubbed a chili pepper against my thumb.  While my grandmother wasn’t being cruel or trying to discipline me, she chose a specific method to help me break a “bad” habit.  Just one taste and needless to say, I never sucked my thumb again.   Thankfully, I escaped childhood without being traumatized from chili peppers, but Beagley’s son may grow up fearing hot sauce.

No parent wants to resort to cruel and unusual punishments to stop misbehaviors.  But even though some parents have the best intentions to discipline without yelling and spanking, no amount of time outs or distractions seem to work.  We’re certainly not advocating for hot sauce or chili peppers as a means of tough love, but as parents, we want to hear your thoughts on discipline. How do you discipline your child in a positive way? What are some no-fail discipline tactics you use?  What are the ones you would never use? Share in the comments section below.

Get more discipline advice on Parents.com:

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupInfant foods should be screened for mycotoxins, scientists say - An international team of scientists calls for protecting complementary food for infants in developing countries — especially those where corn is a staple food — against fumonisin, a toxin produced by fungi. Until now, physicians thought the growth retardation of children in those regions was to be blamed on the poor nutritional value of the complementary maize porridge they receive when breast milk is no longer sufficient. But toxins indeed are involved, the scientists report in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. [Science Daily]

Toymakers jockey for children’s envy, parents’ cash
Toys may be a bright spot during what is predicted to be another tough holiday season for consumer spending. Compared with other retail categories such as luxury and electronics, toys weren’t hit as hard during the economic downturn for one major reason: Many parents will cut back everywhere else before they deprive their children of that Buzz Lightyear action figure or the latest Bratz doll. Plus, toys are relatively cheap. [Bellingham Herald]

Finnish success in tackling childrens’ diabetes - A new Finnish study has found a connection between infants’ diets and childhood diabetes. In the study, carried out over ten years, researchers managed to prevent type 1 diabetes in children with a genetic disposition for the illness. [YLE Finland]

(more…)

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Are the ‘Terrible Twos’ Becoming the ‘Terrible Ones’?

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

terrible-twosParents all dread the “terrible twos”—an age when sweet infants suddenly morph into tantrum-throwing toddlers overnight.

Recent research from toddler specialist Dr. Frans Plooij, author of “The Wonder Weeks,” reveals that aggression, manipulation, yelling, disruptive behavior, and a propensity to say “NO!” may actually start right after a toddler turns one.  A baby’s brain rapidly increases in mental capacity after 15 months, thus leaving babyhood behind and entering toddlerhood.  According to Dr. Plooij, a child starts learning “how to assert himself and separate himself from everyone around him.  For the first time, a child understands he is a different person than mommy and his family is a different family than another family…At this age in development, the now-toddler has figured out how to push the right buttons until he gets what he wants” (SFGate.com).

Coining the term “teenaging toddler,” Dr. Plooij sees the early development of the “terrible twos” as a positive—it’s a prime time for parents to teach their kids certain goals, morals, values, and socialization skills.  Good life lessons will lay the groundwork for well-adjusted kids as they grow up and eventually become teens and adults.

See more Parents.com resources on the “terrible twos”:

Has your toddler reached the “terrible twos” yet?  How are you dealing?  What values and life lessons are you teaching?

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Should Your Toddler Have an iPhone?

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

iPhoneGone are the days when parents could hand children a wooden spoon for entertainment—some parents are reaching for a glitzier, prettier, and more high-tech way of distracting their kids: the iPhones. Since the NYTimes featured the article “Toddlers’ Favorite Toy: The iPhone” this past Sunday, parents have been weighing in. 

Some are horrified at saturating their children with another cold screen that stunts “creative play” (goodbye sky and sunshine) while others are asking, “Why not?”  If the iPhone helps give parents a few quiet minutes while shopping in supermarkets, talking on the phone, traveling in the car, and flying on the plane…then, the iPhone is a miracle worker and cyber life saver.  Toddlers can learn through educational apps and teach their parents how to use certain features, too.  However, some parents are finding that granting their children access to the iPhone is a double-edged sword: kids may be quiet for a brief time, but they grow fussier and louder when they have limited access or when it’s taken away.

Would you let your toddler play with the iPhone?  At what age would you allow your kids to have one?

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog