Posts Tagged ‘ Behavior ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Melamine Tableware May Leach Chemical: Study
A chemical that sickened and killed babies in China when it tainted baby formula can also leach off of tableware and into food, a new small study suggests. However, researchers said, that doesn’t prove the compound, called melamine, is harmful to kids and adults in the amounts detected when study participants ate hot soup from melamine bowls. (via Reuters)

How Disasters and Trauma Can Affect Children’s Empathy
Do children become more kind and empathetic after a disaster— or does the experience make them more focus more on self-preservation? The first study to examine the question in an experimental way shows that children’s reactions may depend on their age. (via TIME)

“Mail To The Chief” Program Sends Letter Of Advice To Obama On Inauguration
As President Barack Obama is publicly inaugurated for a second time Monday, thousands of K-5 students across the country are sending handwritten letters to the president offering advice on his second term. (via Huffington Post)

Longer CPR Improves Survival in Both Children and Adults
Experts from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia were among the leaders of two large national U.S. studies showing that extending CPR longer than previously thought useful saves lives in both children and adults. The research teams analyzed impact of duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients who suffered cardiac arrest while hospitalized. (via Science Daily)

Study: How Parents Lie in the U.S. And China
Almost everyone teaches their children that lying is always wrong. But the vast majority of parents lie to their children in order to get them to behave, according to new research published in the International Journal of Psychology. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, January 3rd, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Boy Suspended For Making Gun Gesture With Hand, Saying ‘Pow’ At Maryland School
A 6-year-old boy was suspended from his Maryland elementary school last month for making a gun gesture with his hand, aiming his fingers at a classmate and saying, “Pow.” Now, his family is fighting the one-day suspension with the help of legal counsel. (via Huffington Post)

Sandy Hook Children Head to School for First Time Since Attack
Twenty days after the massacre that left 20 first graders and six adults dead at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, classes resumed on Thursday for the more than 400 students who lived through the harrowing assault. (via Reuters)

Child Support Claim Rankles Sperm Donor to Lesbian Couple
A Kansas man who donated sperm to a lesbian couple so they could have a child said on Wednesday he is shocked the state is now trying to make him pay child support. (Reuters)

Are Recession Babies Prone to Riskier Behaviors?
A new analysis of data on U.S. teens born during the early 1980s ties slightly higher rates of adolescent smoking, drinking, arrests and thefts to macroeconomic conditions during the first year of life. (via Fox News)

Viral Pranking Mom: Teaching Kids Humor is Important
When a South Dakota mom tricked her 8-year-old son into believing he accidentally purchased a $50,000 car on eBay, she couldn’t resist filming the prank. And then, like so many before her, she posted it online. (via Today)

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Need Help With Your Child’s Behavior?

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Who doesn’t?

We’re halfway through National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week, and we wanted to make sure you knew about an important event that’s happening: Friday at 12 p.m. EST, our friends at Child Mind Institute, as part of their Speak Up For Kids initiative, will present a live Facebook talk called “Managing Behavior: Strategies for Parents and Teachers.”

The presenter is Melanie Fernandez, Ph.D., ABPP, a clinical psychologist with expertise in treating kids’ behavioral problems. Dr. Fernandez is especially well-versed in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, and she’s the director of Child Mind Institute’s Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Program. PCIT is a fascinating technique where parents are coached (behind a one-way mirror and while wearing an earpiece) by experts as they’re playing with their child and given specific suggestions on how to monitor and reinforce their child’s positive behaviors, ignore mild negative ones, and give commands with calm, consistent follow-through.

To watch the hour-long presentation, go to CMI’s Facebook page at 12 p.m. on Friday, where you can post questions for Dr. Fernandez and chat with fellow attendees.

In the meantime, check out all of the events happening around the country through Saturday, May 12, as part of Speak Up For Kids. Mental health professionals in 48 states (and 14 countries!) are leading free talks on childhood mental health disorders and topics of concern to all parents including ADHD, anxiety, depression, behavioral challenges, bullying, trauma, and online safety. Check here for events near you. And for those of you in the New York City area, consider tomorrow’s talk at the 92nd Street Y: “Parenting 2.0: Raising Healthy Children in a Digital Age.” Steven Dickstein, M.D., pediatric psychopharmacologist at CMI, will discuss how much and what kind of exposure is appropriate for kids, and give parents pointers on how to manage children’s screen (and phone!) time, monitor social media participation, and protect them from cyberbullies. It’s free; RSVP at elissa.verrilli@childmind.org.

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Take Our Kids’ Behavior Survey for a Chance to Win a $500 Gift Card

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

At Parents, an important part of our mission is “to harness the power of our readers to advocate continuously and tirelessly for children so that all kids can grow up in a healthy, safe, and loving environment.” That’s why we rely on your feedback.

We’ve teamed up with the Child Mind Institute to create a survey to learn about your attitudes about children’s behavior and mental health. Your responses to our short survey will be strictly confidential and help us create a better magazine for you.

And just in case you need another reason to help us out, you’ll also have the chance to win a $500 Bloomingdales.com gift card! That’s right, spend a few minutes answering our questions and you could make your holiday shopping much easier (or buy something very special for yourself). Goody luck!

Click here to take the survey and get more details about winning a $500 Bloomingdales gift card.

Sweepstakes closes at 11:59 p.m., E.T. on 12/5/11.

Offical Rules

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An Inside Perspective on ADHD Awareness Week (October 16-22)

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder that is more commonly diagnosed during childhood.  Children diagnosed with ADHD are unable to focus or stay still for a long time and act impulsively.  According to the CDC, an average of 5.4 children (9.5%) between ages 4-17 have been diagnosed with ADHD, and boys are more likely to be diagnosed than girls (13.2% vs. 5.6%).  ADHD is also a more common term than Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), although both are still used interchangeably.

This guest post was written by Ben Glenn, the author of “Simply Special, Learning to Love Your ADHD.”  In grade school, he was diagnosed with dyslexia and other learning disabilities, but he wasn’t diagnosed with ADHD until an adult.  Glenn travels the country and the globe, sharing his personal experiences with ADHD. He resides in Indianapolis with his wife and two children. For more information, visit www.SimpleADHDExpert.com.

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Despite the amount of press, websites, and books explaining Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), it is still one of the world’s most misunderstood psychiatric disorders. At its simplest, ADHD is the inability to sustain attention, and the person who has it is generally restless, fidgety, impulsive, and struggles with sustaining productivity. The deeper issue is that people with ADHD have problems with the part of the brain that controls executive functions (also known as the pre-frontal lobes of the cerebral cortex), such as initiating tasks, knowing when to put on the brakes, transitioning easily from one task to another, being systematic and maintaining order, self-monitoring and controlling one’s emotions, and holding onto information vital to completing a task.

While the bulk of scientific data about ADHD has increased in the last quarter century, ADHD is not a new disorder. In fact, it has been around for decades (some speculate even centuries). ADHD was officially recognized in British medical literature for the first time in 1902 (it was labeled as “morbid defect of moral control“) and has, since then, undergone several more name changes (including minimal brain dysfunction). The 2013 revision of The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders might see yet another name revision. While the exact definition of ADHD is still evolving, there is no doubt that ADHD is real and affecting the lives of millions of children and adults. I am one of them.

I wasn’t diagnosed with ADHD until I was an adult because I didn’t have the “hyperactive” element, but the schools did catch my dyslexia in third grade. I hated being labeled. Going to a Special Education classroom was hell. I was teased and treated like a dummy. I struggled with things that were easy for everyone else and done in no time at all, I was walking around feeling like a mistake, like a loser with no future. For a while I really lost all hope. This is a terrible way to grow up.

Children and adults with ADHD get a bad rep for being lazy, unmotivated, disorganized, and unable to complete any task on time. Relationships suffer because people with ADHD tend to blurt out what’s on their mind without thinking or lose interest in the middle of the conversation and wander off. While we all have moments where we display these behaviors, the important distinction is that people with ADHD literally can’t help being this way most of the time. It’s not a matter of trying harder to be better. It’s a neurobiological inability to do so. ADHD is also not the result of bad parenting or “broken homes” or lack of parental attention and discipline. While these may worsen the symptoms of ADHD and negatively impact a child’s behavior, ADHD is not caused by any of these things. Research has shown that ADHD symptoms are caused by brain chemistry. ADHD may also be genetic, which supports some beliefs that ADHD is more “nature” than “nurture.”

However, ADHD is one of the most treatable psychiatric disorders and has one of the best outcomes for anyone who gets the right kind of help and support from understanding parents, friends, teachers, and doctors. Thankfully there were teachers who helped and supported me. I credit them for restoring some of my self-confidence. The rest of the credit goes to my wife, my sympathetic enforcer!

Read More About ADHD on Parents.com

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Secondhand Smoke Tied to Kids’ Behavior Problems
Children exposed to secondhand smoke at home may be more likely than their peers to have learning and behavioral problems, according to a new study.

Eateries Eye Healthier Kids’ Food Amid Pressure
Nineteen U.S. restaurant chains, including Burger King and DineEquity’s IHOP, are backing an industry effort to serve and promote healthier meals for children.

Feeding Kids when Parents, Schools Can’t
More than 21 million children receive free or reduced-price lunches at school. But in the summer, the number of kids participating in food programs drops to fewer than 3 million, despite efforts to raise awareness and increase community support, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said.

Experts Differ on Age Kids Should Walk Alone
The brutal slaying of a Brooklyn boy this week has left many parents asking how young is too young to let your child walk home alone.

App Lets Doctors Monitor Expecting Moms 24/7
Video of a new iPhone and iPad app that helps pregnant women stay in touch with their doctors.

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New Study: Parents Believe Kids Curse More Than They Did as Children

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

As adults, we may laugh amongst ourselves when curses are used in a childlike context (see “Go the F–k to Sleep’“), but it’s less funny when a child is cursing out of context.

In a new study commissioned by Care.com, parents believe their children are cursing more than they themselves did as kids.  Of the 700 parents who participated in a recent online survey, 86% believe that kids ages 2-12 have loose lips when it comes to unmentionable words…and 54% said their children had actually cursed in front of them. 

In some cases (12%), the kids were just repeating a parent’s curse word and 20% didn’t believe their kids understood the meaning of the word.  Eight out of ten parents also confessed to cursing in front of children, even though 93% also tried to suppress the urge to do so.  Along with blaming themselves, parents also cited other reasons why their kids picked up curses: daycare, playgroups, older siblings, television, games, and movies.

According to Dr. Robi Ludwig, Care.com’s Parenting Expert and psychotherapist, “cursing is something that is definitely going to happen, and parents should know this is something to expect and not a reflection of being a bad parent.  However, there are steps parents can take to stop the language before it continues, from creating consequences to monitoring the TV shows and movies your kids watch to correcting houseguests and encouraging the use of alternate words.”  A few more of Dr. Ludwig’s tips to prevent cursing include: don’t overreact, be honest, nip it in the bud, and don’t be tempted by YouTube fame.  (So, parents, put away the recording camera!)

How vigilant are you about not cursing in front of the kids?  What are your tips and advice for dealing with or preventing cursing?

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Participate in a Survey About Autism and Pregnancy

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

In an ongoing effort to understand autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the Interactive Autism Network is launching another online survey (the Pregnancy and Birth Questionnaire) about the pregnancy and birth experiences of mothers raising children with autism.  Researchers will analyze any “potential links between prenatal, pereinatal, or neonatal factors” and autism, such as specific medications, foods, fertility treatments, ultrasounds, pregnancy and birth complications (including illness or infection),  and induced labor.

IAN is looking for mothers  in the U.S. with children (between ages 0 to 17) who do and don’t have autism to participate in the survey.  Mothers who do have kids with autism must have given birth directly to the child. Register for the online survey on the Interactive Autism Network’s website.

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