Posts Tagged ‘ bacteria ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, November 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Therapy Can Help Scared Moms Avoid C-Sections
Group therapy can help women avoid risky and costly cesarean sections, especially first-time mothers fearful of childbirth, according to a new study. (via NBC News)

Clues to Cause of Kids’ Brain Tumors
New research on a genetic condition that causes brain cancer is helping scientists better understand the most common type of brain tumor in children. (via ScienceDaily)

Bacteria on Binkies: A Recipe for Crankiness
The latest research suggests that instead of curing crankiness, pacifiers may actually cause babies to be more unruly. (via Time)

School Districts Brace for Cuts as Fiscal Crisis Looms
If the government is unable to resolve the looming debt crisis, federal education programs for elementary and high schools will lose a little over $2 billion starting next fall. (via New York Times)

Four Family Cultures of America Indentified
Four types of family cultures—the Faithful, the Engaged Progressives, the Detached and the American Dreamers—are molding the next generation of Americans, a new study finds. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

ADHD Diagnoses Up 66 Percent Since 2000
According to a new study, the number of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased by 66 percent over the past 10 years.

Brazil: Computer Chips Track Students
Grade-school students in a northeastern Brazilian city are using uniforms embedded with computer chips that alert parents if they are cutting classes, the city’s education secretary said.

Principal’s Decree: This Is a ‘No Hugging School’
More than 900 students at a New Jersey middle school have been told no more hugging.

Early Bacteria Exposure Important for Building Immunity, Study Says
Moms, don’t worry too much about getting those surfaces sanitary: New research suggests early exposure to bacteria is critically important to children to keep autoimmune diseases at bay, throughout life.

Brains of Kids With Math Anxiety Function Differently, Says Study
Kids who get the jitters before a math test may actually have different brain functions than kids without math anxiety, according to a new study.

Parents Should Lead By Example in Weight Loss, Study Finds
Losing weight themselves is the best way for parents to help their children shed excess pounds, new research suggests.

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Cleaning Tips for a Germ-Free Playroom

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

Spring cleaning may still be months away, but it doesn’t hurt to keep your kid’s playroom clean during the winter season when bacteria and germs are more likely to spread.

Melissa Homer, Chief Cleaning Officer at MaidPro and busy mom on-the-go, specializes in helping other busy moms like you maintain a clean home in no time at little cost.  Below, she shares four strategies for organizing and cleaning a playroom.

Disinfect the ToysA toy must be completely disinfected for it to be clean. Soak the toys for 5 minutes in a solution of 3/4 cup bleach mixed in a gallon of water. Rinse and let dry.  For large toys, use a disinfecting multipurpose spray cleaner and wipe them dry with a clean rag. One of Melissa’s favorite mommy time savers is making a large batch of bleach water in the bathtub to disinfect a large number of toys at once.

Give Each Toy a Home - Keeping things clean with kids is already hard enough in a cluttered, disorganized room.  To keep things under control, use tubs, baskets, and shelves to place and store toys in a neat and compartmentalized way.

Keep Toys in Rotation - If you have too many toys to keep in one place, try rotating toys regularly (every few weeks or months).  Keep a majority of  toys stored away (e.g. basement, garage, storage closet, etc.), but leave out an interesting and varied  mix to keep your little one entertained.

Enlist the Help of Professional Cleaners -  Cleaning tasks should be divided and shared between both parents.  If there isn’t time, make room in your budget for a professional cleaner to take care of deep scrub cleaning once a month.  This way, you can spend less time maintaining the house the rest of the time so you can spend more time with the family.

More about germ-free living on Parents.com

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 25th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupStudy: Moms, kids more overweight than they think
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center in New York asked 111 women and 111 children a series of questions about their age, income and body size. They also measured their height and weight. About 80% of participants were Hispanic. The rest were black, Asian or white.They were shown pictorial images of different body silhouettes representing a range of weights, including underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese and extremely obese. Many heavy-set moms and children think they are slimmer than they actually are, a new study shows. It’s a trend that pediatricians and other doctors have noticed. (USA Today)

Boy, 10, arrested for driving off in parents’ SUV in a snit

*Video (MSNBC)

Two-thirds of alcohol wipes contaminated with bacteria
Two-thirds of tested samples of alcohol prep pads tied to a massive recall, serious infections and death were contaminated with dangerous bacteria, including tainted products from eight of 10 separate lots, according to a new government report. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday offered more detail about problems with medical wipes manufactured by H&P Industries Inc., which does business as the Triad Group of Hartland, Wis.
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Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupUnder Pressure, Firm Shutters Line That Made Tainted Wipes
A Wisconsin medical supplier that made millions of recalled alcohol prep products now blamed for serious infections and at least one death is shutting down the line that produces the wipes — at least for now. But the parents of two children harmed by infections blamed on contaminated Triad products said the move is too little, too late, and raises more questions about why government regulators haven’t taken stronger action against the firm. [MSNBC]

Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk
Women in the study who drank more than a cup of coffee a day had a 22% to 25% lower risk of stroke than those who drank less, according to findings reported Thursday in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, behind heart disease and cancer. The findings add to the growing body of research showing coffee appears to have hidden health perks. A study done by Larsson in 2008 on men who drank coffee or tea had similar results. One of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants that improve health. Other research has suggested coffee can help prevent cognitive decline and can boost vision and heart health. It is also associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. [USA Today]

Dog Kisses: Is  It Safe to Smooch with a Pet?
According to an article in WebMd, not even doctors and veterinarians agree about kissing a dog on the lips or vice versa. Thinking that dog’s tongue is clean is off base, says veterinarian William Craig, but don’t stop there. “Dog spit isn’t chemically cleansing. It turns out that it’s the dog’s rough tongue that helps to physically remove contaminants from an open wound” and likely the reason why many wounds do not get infected,” he told Pawnation. Craig adds “people tend to brush their teeth regularly and rinse with mouthwash. Dogs tend to lick themselves and eat things off the ground.” “Humans and dogs have different bacteria in their mouths,” explains Nelle Wyatt, a veterinary technician at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center. “Not all of the bacteria are capable of causing disease in the other species.” [USA Today]

Boy Toddlers Need Extra Help Dealing With Negative Emotions, Experts Urge
The way you react to your two-year-old’s temper tantrums or clinginess may lead to anxiety, withdrawal and behavior problems down the road, and the effect is more pronounced if the child is a boy who often displays such negative emotions as anger and social fearfulness, reports a new University of Illinois study. [Science Daily]

Passive Smoking Increases Risk of Stillbirth and Birth Defects, Study Suggests
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. [Science Daily]

Teacher Who Twice Threw a Chair at 7th-Grader Tries to Clear Her Name
A longtime teacher at a Joliet junior high who last year “snapped” and twice threw a chair at a seventh-grade boy, striking him once in the head, is trying to clear her record so she can teach again. After Filak tried to get the boy to do his work, he instead told her to “leave me alone, fool,” witnesses said, according to a judge’s ruling that found the chair-throwing incident was child abuse. [Chicago Tribune]

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, December 10th, 2010

‘Good’ bacteria help kids with stomach pain
Doses of probiotics, which are “good bacteria,” may help alleviate frequent stomach and intestinal pain in children, according to a new study. (MSNBC)

Rolaids recalled for bits of metal, wood in tablets
Johnson & Johnson on Thursday recalled several types of Rolaids antacids in the U.S. because of reports of metal and wood particles in the products. The products include Rolaids Extra Strength Softchews, Rolaids Extra Strength plus Gas Softchews and Rolaids Multi-Symptom plus Anti-Gas Softchews. The company says the materials were potentially introduced into the products during the manufacturing process at an outside manufacturer. (MSNBC)

Babies on planes: Debate over safety renewed
The NTSB has repeatedly pushed for a rule requiring all airline passengers — including infants  — to be restrained in a separate seat. However, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) still allows children 2 years and younger to travel unrestrained on airplanes if seated on an adult’s lap. The NTSB submitted its latest safety recommendation to the FAA in August, citing plane crashes where young children held on a parent’s lap were injured or killed. (MSNBC)

Girls who walk, bike to school do better in tests
Girls, but not boys, who walk or bike to school instead of getting a ride perform better in tests of verbal and math skills, according to a new study of teens living in Spanish cities.And the longer the commute, the higher the test scores, regardless of how much exercise girls got outside of school. (MSNBC)
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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

New study suggests most preschool-age children exceed daily screen time recommendations: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents limit combined screen time from television, DVDs, computers, and video games to 2 hours per day for preschool-age children. In a study soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that many children are exposed to screen time both at home and while at child care, with 66% exceeding the recommended daily amount. [Medical News Today]

Plugged up: Doctors see signs of worsening constipation in children: Mild constipation in children is fairly common, but gastroenterologists at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center have been seeing what they believe is the start of a troubling trend: more children with more serious and chronic bouts of the condition. Experts attribute the problem to lack of physical activity, inadequate water intake and fiber-poor diets. [Medical News Today]

Allergies and wheezing illnesses in childhood may be determined in the womb: The new research, funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the British Lung Foundation, and undertaken at Southampton General Hospital, reveals that fetuses which develop quickly in early pregnancy but falter later in pregnancy are likely to go on to develop allergies and asthma as children. Scientists believe this is due to changes in the development of their immune system and lungs. [Medical News Today]

What can country of birth tell us about childhood asthma?: Researchers from Tufts University pooled data from five previous epidemiological studies to investigate the prevalence of asthma in children in the Boston neighborhoods of Chinatown and Dorchester. Among children born in the United States, low socioeconomic status (SES) and exposure to pests (mice and cockroaches) were both associated with having asthma. Neither association was present in children born outside of the United States. [Science Daily]

Knowledge gaps, fears common among parents of children with drug-resistant bacteria: Knowledge gaps and fear some of it unjustified are common among the caregivers of children with a drug-resistant staph bacterium known as MRSA, according to the results of a small study from the Johns Hopkins Children Center. These caregivers thirst for timely, detailed and simple information, the researchers add. [Medical News Today]

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