Posts Tagged ‘ baby food ’

American Baby’s Baby Booty: Win a Gerber Graduates Basket Worth $200

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Here is my #tbt: My daughter, Grace, demanding dinner. I remember trying to explain to a childless colleague in the office that when a toddler is hungry, even a 20-minute supper is too much to ask. Two toddler lessons we all learn: When a toddler says she has to go to the bathroom, she means right now, and when she says she’s hungry, she means very and seriously now.

My main strategy has always been to serve my kids an appetizer while I cook dinner, usually something like fruit or crackers. But we all have days when you just need to feed a kid immediately, and that’s why Gerber makes Graduates Lil Entrees. I kept them on hand for times when I wanted to feed Grace, then eat something more elaborate with my husband later on. It wasn’t every night, because we are huge fans of family dinners, but it definitely happened!

Gerber just released four new toddler entrees: Mashed Potatoes & Meatloaf Nuggets in Gravy with Carrots, Peas & Corn; Creamy Chicken Stew with Vegetables with Green Beans & Carrots; Spiral Pasta in Turkey Meat Sauce with Green and Yellow Beans; and Yellow Rice & Chicken with Vegetables in Sauce with Green Beans and Carrots. There are also two new flavors of their Bitty Bites multi-grain snacks: blueberry and strawberry. 

To celebrate, Gerber is giving away a gift basket full of baby food from its Gerber Graduates line for TWO lucky winners. Each gift basket retails at $200 each!

To enter, leave a comment below, up to one a day between today and the end of the day January 22. More Qs about our giveaway? Read the official rules. Be sure to check back on January 23 and scroll to the bottom of the post to see who won. We reach out to winners via Facebook message (it goes into your “other” message folder on Facebook), so if you win, look for us there as well. Goody luck!

And PS if your baby is just starting solids check out this video:

Congrats to our winners Jared Brunson and Lindsey Maxwell!

Starting Solid Food
Starting Solid Food
Starting Solid Food

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Raising Adventurous Eaters (And Cooks!)

Thursday, June 13th, 2013

Want your kid to eat broccoli and brussels sprouts? Paul Lindley, a British father of two, created Ella’s Kitchen in 2006 to do just that. His goal was to encourage his daughter to explore new foods and, hopefully, banish picky-ness. The organic baby food creator just released The Cookbook: The Red One, which just might get your kids to like their veggies, too.

Q: Why did you write this cookbook?

A: Involving children with cooking and food at an early age can help shape their future relationships with food. The Cook Book: The Red One features fun ideas and creative activities that allow little ones to experience healthy foods outside of mealtimes, from getting creative with vegetable prints to playing at a “Cool Kiddie Café.” We offer ways for children to learn more about fruit and vegetables using all their senses, to help them develop healthy eating habits that last a lifetime.

Q: What is Ella’s Kitchen? What products do you offer and how did you get started?

A: I launched Ella’s Kitchen in 2006 to help babies and toddlers enjoy eating healthy food. I had an understanding of what makes children tick from being a parent myself, as well as from my experience working at Nickelodeon.

I was inspired to set up Ella’s Kitchen by my own experiences in weaning Ella. I passionately believe that all kids should have the opportunity to discover that healthy food can be fun, tasty, and cool.

At Ella’s Kitchen we believe that little ones eat using all of their senses, and therefore it was important for us to produce foods that not only taste great, but are bright, tactile and fun. We always approach healthy eating from a child’s perspective and take simple, natural ingredients to create foods and packaging that really connect with kids and their parents – helping them through the entire weaning process.

Q: There is a large element for children in this book. The illustrations are playful and fun and there are drawings to color. Why was this important to include?

A: We always approach everything we do from a child’s perspective and our cookbook is no different. The book is for the whole family and the easy instructions, clever shortcuts and fun activities allow little ones to engage with healthy foods outside of mealtimes. It’s all about getting children hands-on and messy in the kitchen from a young age.

Q: Why is organic, fresh, and homemade so important to you?

A: Organic food is better because it comes from carefully monitored sources with high standards in quality but habits—both good and bad—are formed in the earliest years of a child’s life. It’s crucial to start a healthy diet from a young age. Develop healthy eating habits by getting your little one involved in food; let her help during the cooking process and make yummy homemade dishes together.

Q: How and why did you get into food and cooking?

A: I’ve always loved cooking. Even as a child of 6 years-old, I used to help my mum make surprise birthday cakes! Then when Ella was born, I—like any parent—struggled at times to get her to eat certain foods. So I designed games to make mealtime fun. In our home, meals have always been messy, noisy, interactive events. The whole family enjoys the experience of creating dishes together. Sitting down to enjoy them always makes me smile.

Q: Your personal inspiration came from your children, Ella and Paddy. Did they help in the creation of the book? Did they create any recipes?

A: Two of the recipes in the new cookbook are my family’s own, including Ella’s Dad’s Sweet + Sour Prawns and Ella’s Mum’s Easy Chicken Curry. We first made the chicken curry when Ella was just three years old and she’s loved it ever since, as it’s mild, sweet and creamy. Ella and Paddy were involved in tasting lots of recipes when we were experimenting with ideas!

Q: Ella, now 13, wrote the book’s Foreword and has been in the kitchen since age 4. Does she have goals to pursue cooking professionally in the future?

A: Ella’s favorite school subject is Food Technology, so you never know! At this stage in her life she’s busy having fun with her friends. All we wish is that when she grows up, she does something that she’s passionate about and believes in.

Q: Your recipes are family-friendly, but some have unexpected flavor combos—do you have certain chefs or books that you look to? Where do you find culinary inspiration?

A: The inspiration for our recipes came in lots of different forms; from real mums and dads, friends and family, and our ever-so-clever recipe developer Emma Jane Frost. Our team of nutritionists selected and approved every recipe to ensure that kids have balanced meals to help them grow.

Q: You have tips on preventing picky-ness, but what advice do you give parents who already have picky eaters?

A: Help your kids use all of their senses when exploring new foods—this will teach them to love healthy food from the start! The key is to be patient and persistent. Little ones have three times as many taste buds as adults, which leads to a taste intensity of up to 10 times that of an adult. As a result, both sweet and bitter tastes are exaggerated, often leading to immediate rejection of brussel sprouts and broccoli. It can take 10 separate experiences of a new taste before it’s accepted, so don’t give up after the first couple of times! Keep going and your little one will eat up their vegetables in no time.

Q: Growing up, who did most of the cooking in your family? What was a typical weeknight meal like?

A: I grew up in Sheffield, England and it was my mum who did most of the cooking. Her crispy Yorkshire puddings were a big favourite in our house – whether filled with sausages and gravy during the week or as part of a family roast with meat and loads of veg at the weekend. I can still hear the crunch they made when I close my eyes now!

Q: If you could only eat one meal for the rest of your life what would it be and why?

A: It’d have to be my mum’s Yorkshire puddings now that it’s in my mind – Mmmm! There are so many different things to fill them with that I’d never get bored. Ella and Paddy love them too and I’m sure we’d have fun experimenting with new things to put in them!

Q: What other important things should our readers know about you or the book?

A: At Ella’s we always try to look at life from a child’s point of view: with an open mind and with all our senses. My strong belief is that the more a young child is involved with his or her food, whether that’s choosing it, preparing it, playing with it or eating it independently—the more likely he or she is to give it a try and go on to enjoy it!

Interview has been condensed and edited.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Test of Anthrax Vaccine in Children Gets Tentative OK
A presidential ethics panel has opened the door to testing an anthrax vaccine on children as young as infants, bringing an angry response from critics who say the children would be guinea pigs in a study that would never help them and might harm them. (via Reuters)

Most Parents Don’t Follow Doctor’s Orders
Two-thirds of parents say they don’t always follow the advice they get from their child’s doctor, according to a new poll. The findings showed that 56 percent of parents said they follow the advice they’re given most of the time, while 13 percent said they follow it only occasionally, according to the findings from the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health. (via NBC News)

Student Suspended for Pop-Tart Gun, Josh Welch, Files Appeal with Maryland School System
An attorney for an Anne Arundel County 7-year-old suspended from school for nibbling a pastry into the shape of a pistol has filed an appeal with the county school system to have the suspension overturned and the student’s record expunged, saying he will “go all the way to the Maryland Court of Appeals” if needed to pursue the case. (via Huffington Post)

New Guidelines for Athletes with Concussions
A major medical group is updating its guidelines for handling amateur or professional athletes suspected of having a concussion. The American Academy of Neurology says the athletes should be taken out of action immediately and kept out until they’ve been cleared by a health care provider with training about concussions. (via FOX News)

Organic Baby Food: It’s More Expensive, but it May Not Be More Nutritious
Parents go organic for a variety of reasons, including environmental concerns and a desire to avoid pesticide residue. And in some cases, they just want a status symbol. According to the consumer market research firm Mintel, organic baby food made up about 10 percent of the $1.4 billion U.S. baby food and snacks market in 2011. But studies show that parents who are aiming to buy the best food for their infants may not need to spring for the expensive organics. (via The Washington Post)

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American Baby’s Baby Booty: Win Goods from Gerber!

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Every baby looks like he or she could be the Gerber Baby, no? But the sketch is of a woman named Ann Turner Cook, who was 5 months old in 1929 when her neighbor drew her for what would become the iconic baby face. She visited our offices a few years ago, and we loved it! 

Gerber is running a nationwide baby-photo search on Facebook right now. The winner will appear in an ad campaign but even better, get $50,000! You have until August 26th to upload your little one’s photo. Best of luck, maybe your own kid will be the 2012 Gerber Baby!

As for Gerber’s baby food, my own daughter was an infant when they debuted their first organics. Now, the organic recipes come in pouches that are easy to throw in your diaper bag and less heavy in your grocery bag than the traditional glass jars. (Though the jars can be recycled, so they have that going for them.) I have such fond memories of planning out baby Grace’s meals. She loved prunes and apricots most of all, so we’d often do one of those for breakfast, but always got a green vegetable in at lunch or dinner. It’s still pretty much the same for her at age 10; fruit with breakfast and broccoli or peas or salad with dinner!

I’m happy to say that Gerber is going to give one lucky family almost $110 worth of free baby food just for leaving a comment at this post. Tell me your baby’s favorite puree flavor, perhaps? You have from now through the end of the day on Wednesday, August 8th, to leave a comment. We’ll randomly pick one person to win 15 Gerber Graduate Puffs, 15 Gerber Graduate Lil’ Entrees, and 25 Gerber Organic 2nd Food Pouches, a $108.95 value. You can read the official rules here. Good luck! 

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American Baby’s Baby Booty: Get a Baby Food Maker!

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Joe meets blueberries

It’s an incredible responsibility, giving a baby his first taste of solid food. I made a big deal out of giving my son Joe his first rice cereal—I had a whole little ceremony at my Dad’s house. So of course Joe spit it right back out like it was poison. You’d think I would have learned my lesson after my firstborn, Grace, rejected the steamed, pureed carrots her aunt lovingly made for her first serving of veggies. Here’s the good news: Both my kids have gone on to be champion eaters. They will try anything, and enjoy most foods, even at the tricky ages of 6 and 9. I’d pat myself on the back except I’m not sure that I had much to do with it, beyond making sure they tasted a lot of different flavors between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. A 1-year-old will put anything in his mouth, it doesn’t have to be bland or sweet. But I have friends who served up a wide variety of tastes and still ended up with a picky kid, so it’s not a foolproof way to get a little foodie, just a good practice to try.

Yesterday I read an entertaining entry in my coworker’ baby food blog. Heather Morgan Shott chronicles her adventures feeding her son, Mason, at High Chair Times. Over the holidays, Mason accidentally ate peanut butter for the first time, giving his mom a scare as she watched to make sure he didn’t have an allergic reaction. It’s one of those funny-because-nothing-happened stories, and was similar to a scene that played out with me and baby Grace. She was sitting on my lap in a Thai restaurant when I absentmindedly let her chew on a steamed vegetable that had been in peanut sauce. In my sleep-deprived stupor, I didn’t even think about it until the end of the meal, when all I could do is be thankful she’s not allergic.

This is all to say that I salute all of you who are feeding a baby, or about to start. You’ll hear advice from everyone, but there is no one guideline to follow on the baby-food journey. You can get a rough idea of how much food—and what type—babies eat, here. And are you into the idea of making purees yourself? Check out our new story on homemade fruit purees. Since so many moms are on the make-your-own kick, I’m going to give away one Baby Brezza One-Step Baby Food Maker, which retails for $100, and one Baby Bullet set, worth $90. They’ll be part of a baby food maker slideshow, which I promise to post shortly. You have through Wednesday, January 11th to post a comment and be entered to win one of the two baby food makers; read the full rules here. You can only post once a day. Goody luck!

 

 

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Sun exposure in babies could mean cancer later
Getting too much sun is bad for anyone, but it’s especially dangerous for babies, whose sensitive skin hasn’t developed enough layers of natural protection to withstand intense summer rays. (CNN)

Warnings and tips for stepparents
Editorial from CNN: Forty percent of Americans have at least one steprelative in their family, either a stepparent, a stepsibling or half sibling, or a stepchild, according to the Pew Research Center. (CNN)

GoodGuide Ranks the Best and Worst Baby Foods
Concerns about the eating habits of American children are constantly in the headlines, whether it’s the ballooning obesity epidemic among youngsters or bans on Happy Meals to encourage fast food chains to serve healthier food. (Wallet Pop)

(more…)

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Tags: , , | Categories: GoodyBlog, News

Motherhood: A ‘Prison’ for Women?

Monday, November 8th, 2010

100sq_MTN100Erica Jong certainly thinks so. In her controversial  ”Mother Madness” essay that appeared in Saturday’s Wall Street Journal,  the novelist and poet argues strenuously against “attachment parenting”—a method that calls for an almost constant mental and physical connection between mother and child.

Jong makes the case that in today’s hectic world of busy working mothers such a style is completely impractical when the daily demands of these women are taken into account. “You wear your baby, sleep with her and attune yourself totally to her needs. How you do this and also earn the money to keep her is rarely discussed. You are just assumed to be rich enough,” she writes.

Jong says that while attachment parenting calls for the mother and father to be available to their baby almost constantly, creating a support group of multiple caregivers is not only helpful to stressed out parents but is also essential to raising a well-socialized, independent child. “Kinship is not exclusively biological, after all, and you need a brood to raise a brood,” she writes.

Similarly, she continues, simply because a woman chooses not to breastfeed, make her own baby food, or use cloth diapers does not by any means make her a less-loving or less capable mother. “We need to be released from guilt about our children, not further bound by it,” she explains. ”We need someone to say: Do the best you can. There are no rules.”

Needless to say, many commentors and bloggers have pounced on Jong and come to the defense of attachment parenting. Share your take with us!

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