Posts Tagged ‘ Babies ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Texas School System Finance Plan Unconstitutional, Judge Rules
The system Texas uses to fund public schools violates the state’s constitution by not providing enough money to school districts and failing to distribute it fairly, a judge ruled Monday in a landmark decision that could force the Legislature to overhaul the way it pays for education. (via Huffington Post)

Adult Diabetes Drug May Work in Very Obese Youth
A drug originally approved to treat adults with diabetes may also help severely obese youths lose some weight, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Where Do Babies Come From: Why a Super Bowl Ad Got It Wrong
“Dad, where do babies come from?” The opening line of Kia’s Super Bowl commercial doesn’t beat around the bush. The question spills forth during a car ride, making Dad’s eyes bug out before he quickly recovers and spins a fantastical story of a planet, Babylandia, from which newborns of every ilk originate. (via Time)

Researchers Pioneer Treatment for Viral Infection Common in Children
Researchers at Imperial College London have discovered a new way in which a very common childhood disease could be treated. In the first year of life, 65 per cent of babies get infected by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). (via Science Daily)

Playtime: Affectionate, Less Controlling Mothers Have Strongest Relations with Their Children
Researchers long have evaluated the roles parents play in children’s development. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that mothers’ directiveness, the extent to which they try to control the content and pace of young children’s play, varies based on the children’s ages and the mothers’ ethnicities. In addition, the study found that the more directive the mothers were during play, the less engaged children were with them and the more negative emotion the children displayed toward their mothers. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, December 31st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pediatricians Say Recess Is As Important as Math or Reading
Recess can be a critical time for development and social interaction, and in a new policy statement published in the journal Pediatrics, pediatricians from the AAP support the importance of having a scheduled break in the school day. (via TIME)

Moms Push to Have First Babies of the New Year
The odds of having a baby in the first minute of the year aren’t far from the odds of getting struck by lightning, said Dr. Jennifer Austin, an OB/GYN at Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco. Yet every year, several mothers strive to do so. (via ABC News)

Every School Needs a Doctor, Pediatricians Say
Despite no federal or uniform state requirements to do so, all school districts should have a doctor to oversee school health services, according to a policy statement from a group of American pediatricians. (via Reuters)

FDA Approves First Tuberculosis Drug in 40 Years
The Food and Drug Administration says it has approved a Johnson & Johnson tuberculosis drug that is the first new medicine to fight the deadly infection in more than four decades. (via Associated Press)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Occasional Family Meals Enough to Boost Kids’ Fruit and Veggie Intake
Eating meals together as a family, even if only once or twice a week, increases children’s daily fruit and vegetable intake to near the recommended 5 A Day, according to new research. (via ScienceDaily)

Probiotics Might Limit Infant Skin Problems
Children who take a supplement of probiotics – those “good” bacteria that live in our guts – are less likely to develop eczema, according to a new review of studies. (via Reuters)

Two Cups of Milk Daily Enough For Most Kids
Two cups of cow’s milk per day may be enough for most kids to have the recommended amount of vitamin D in their blood while maintaining a healthy iron level, suggests a new study. (via Reuters)

New Online Privacy Rules For Children
In a move intended to give parents greater control over data collected about their children online, federal regulators on Wednesday broadened longstanding privacy safeguards covering children’s mobile apps and Web sites. (via New York Times)

Teen’s Views on Dangers of Pot Fall to 20-Year Low
Teenagers’ perception of the dangers of marijuana has fallen to the lowest level in more than 20 years, a new study says, prompting federal researchers to warn that already high use of the drug could increase as more states move to legalize it. (via ABC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Colic Treatment? Manipulative Therapies May Be Beneficial Treatment for Infantile Colic
A Cochrane review of studies into manipulative therapies for colic, by the University of Southampton, suggests that the treatment technique may be of some benefit. (via ScienceDaily)

Fiscal Cliff Would Hurt Young Children, Advocates Warn
As headlines warn of a looming fiscal cliff that could result in massive cuts to government programs, advocates are worrying about the fates of people who can’t yet read them. Early-childhood education advocates recently reached out to President Barack Obama and congressional leaders in an effort to protect programs that serve low-income young children. (via Huffington Post)

Many Parents Unaware of Children’s Experiences in Daycare
While parents hope to be informed of what goes on when they’re not around, a recent Concordia study suggests that parents ought to be more involved in the daycare experience, a major component of their child’s development. (via ScienceDaily)

Texas Governor Seeks Law Banning Late-Term Abortions
Texas Governor Rick Perry called on state lawmakers on Tuesday to pass a bill banning late-term abortions, a controversial prohibition that has been pushed by anti-abortion activists since 2010. (via Reuters)

TV in Bedrooms may Boost Kids’ Risk of Fat, Disease
Kids who have TVs in their bedrooms are twice as likely to be fat and nearly three times as likely to be at risk for heart disease and diabetes as those who don’t, according to a new study that renews concerns about health and screen time. (via NBC News)

Doctors Urged to Intervene, Prevent Youth Smoking
Primary care physicians should offer children and teens counseling and guidance to prevent them from starting smoking, according to draft guidelines issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). (via CNN)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, December 10th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Iron May Prevent Behavioral Issues in Small Babies
Iron supplements may help boost brain development and ward off behavioral problems in babies who are born a bit on the small side, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Could Kids’ Salt Intake Affect Their Weight?
Children who eat a lot of salty food also tend to down more sugary drinks — which, in turn, might be related to their risk of obesity, a new study suggests. (via US News and World Report)

School Lunches To Be Allowed Unlimited Meats, Grains, USDA Announces
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told members of Congress in a letter Friday that the department will do away with daily and weekly limits of meats and grains. Several lawmakers wrote the department after the new rules went into effect in September saying kids aren’t getting enough to eat. (via Huffington Post)

ADHD Linked to Oxygen Deprivation Before Birth
Children who had in-utero exposure to ischemic-hypoxic conditions, situations during which the brain is deprived of oxygen, were significantly more likely to develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder later in life as compared to unexposed children, according to a recent study. The findings suggest that events in pregnancy may contribute to the occurrence of ADHD over and above well-known familial and genetic influences of the disorder. (via ScienceDaily)

Oxytocin Produces More Engaged Fathers and More Responsive Infants
A large body of research has focused on the ability of oxytocin to facilitate social bonding in both marital and parenting relationships in human females. A new laboratory study has found that oxytocin administration to fathers increases their parental engagement, with parallel effects observed in their infants. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

New Prenatal Test Could Improve Detection of Congenital Diseases
A new genetic test that analyzes fetal DNA in more detail than current prenatal tests can detect additional abnormalities, including those associated with autism and other intellectual disabilities, making them a potentially more accurate way of predicting disease risk. (via Time)

An Inadequate Diet During Pregnancy Predisposes the Baby to Diabetes
A study now insists on the importance of a healthy diet as a way of avoiding increased insulin and glucose levels in the child, both of which are indicators of diabetes and metabolic syndrome risk. (via ScienceDaily)

Baby Deaths Prompt CPSC to Sue Nap Nanny Maker
Makers of the popular Nap Nanny infant recliner seats, which have been tied to the deaths of five babies, have failed to do enough about the potential hazard, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said Wednesday. (via NBC News)

A Blood Test for Autism?
Earlier detection of autism, relying on markers in the blood, may help more children to take advantage of helpful behavioral therapies. (via Time)

Teen Fistfights Down in Many Nations, But Not US
Fistfights among children have become less common over the last decade in 19 out of 30 countries surveyed in a Canadian study – but fighting in the United States and Canada has remained steady. (via NBC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Autism Risk for Developing Children Exposed to Air Pollution: Infant Brain May Be Affected by Air Quality
Research demonstrates that polluted air — whether regional pollution or coming from local traffic sources — is associated with autism. (via ScienceDaily)

Study Leaves Women with Conflicting Advice on Mammograms
Controversial U.S. guidelines for mammography issued in 2009, calling for screening every two years rather than annually for women over 50 years old, can result in breast cancers being missed, according to U.S. researchers studying the hotly debated topic. (via Reuters)

U.S. Children Get Recommended Amounts of Sleep: Study
While parents may sometimes despair of their children getting enough shut-eye, especially with age-old stalling tactics of another story or another glass of water, children in the United States do appear to be getting the recommended amount of sleep. (via Reuters)

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Improves Quality of Life in Children With Asthma and Anxiety
Researchers have found that a program of cognitive behavior therapy delivered by nurses to children who had asthma and anxiety improved the children’s quality of life scores and reduced the risk of escalation of treatment. (via ScienceDaily)

7-Year-Old Girl One of Oregon’s Youngest Medical Marijuana Patients
A 7-year-old girl suffering from leukemia is one of Oregon’s youngest medical marijuana patients. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Likely Basis of Birth Defect Causing Premature Skull Closure in Infants Identified
An international team of geneticists, pediatricians, surgeons and epidemiologists from 23 institutions across three continents has identified two areas of the human genome associated with the most common form of non-syndromic craniosynostosis ― premature closure of the bony plates of the skull. (via ScienceDaily)

Flame Retardants Used in Foam Upholstered Furniture and Other Products Linked to Neurodevelopmental Delays in Children
Prenatal and childhood exposure to flame retardant compounds are linked to poorer attention, fine motor coordination and IQ in school-aged children, a finding by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health that adds to growing health concerns over a chemical prevalent in U.S. households. (via ScienceDaily)

Study: Youngest Kids in Class May Be More Likely to Get ADHD Diagnosis
A new study from Iceland adds to existing evidence that kids are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder if they’re among the youngest in their grade at school. (via US Health News)

Study: One in 20 Youth has Used Steroids to Bulk Up
If the government is unable to resolve the looming debt crisis, federal education programs for elementary and high schools will lose a little over $2 billion starting next fall. (via Reuters)

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