Posts Tagged ‘ awareness month ’

Top 10 Things to Do After Your Child’s Autism Diagnosis

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

autism awareness ribbonEditor’s Note: The tips in this post were provided by Autism Today (www.AutismToday.com), a resource website for autism that was founded by Karen Simmons, a mom of six kids (two with special needs).  The advice below is aimed at helping parents who are dealing with autism for the first time.

1. Start Local. Find a strong local support system and learn what is available in your area. Reach out to nearby cities if needed.

2. Utilize the Internet. Go to reliable websites with autism resources to educate yourself on programs, services, interventions, therapies, and supports.

3. Qualify Your Doctor. Locate a medical doctor who specializes in autism and has experience treating autism. A referral from other parents or a reputable autism organization is best.

4. Look Into Special Services. Check for related health services focused on speech and language, recreational therapy, occupational therapy, physical and behavioral therapy, etc.

5. Reach Out for Help. Make use of specific government agencies and public services that support autism, especially in the early intervention arena.

6. Educate Your Family. Teach relatives, friends, neighbors, and your child’s siblings and peers about autism and share what  your family is going through. Help them be more accepting and to understand the challenges.

7. Get Up to Speed. Stay current with the latest medical, biomedical, behavioral, and education services so you can pick and choose what is right for your child and your family.

8. Be Involved. Attend conferences focused on educational information and network with other individuals with autism, families, and professionals in the field. You may find lifelong alliances!

9. Take Frequent Breaks. Find and take advantage of  respite for yourselves.  As caregivers, you will need it.

10. Plan for the Future. Autism is a lifelong disorder and is not going to go away, but with proper interventions, it improves over time.  And as long as parents, caregivers, and other supporters have the best mindset, a child they can be guided toward leading a happy, fulfilling life.

More about autism on Parents.com

Image: A puzzle patterned ribbon symoblizing autism awareness via Shutterstock.

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October Is National Bullying Prevention Month

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Bullying and its technological twin, cyberbullying, are still ever-present news topics.  As the year progresses, some schools are implementing anti-bullying policies while others are still making sense of tragic suicides.

Since October is also National Bullying Prevention Month (along with Breast Cancer Awareness and Down Syndrome Awareness), we want to bring you our latest resources for stopping bullying and cyberbullying.

Bullying

Cyberbullying

In other news, the Interactive Autism Network is also launching a nationwide survey that will study how bullying affects children with autism.  Since children with autism are vulnerable and frequent targets of bullying, IAN is looking for parents to share their stories in order to educate teachers and school administrators.

Plus, a free new iPhone/iPad app called BeSeen is now available, geared for kids 11 and up.  The mobile app acts as an educational game that simulates a social networking site.  Kids navigate a school year through a Facebook-like environment, learning how to interact with others in positive ways, how to protect personal and private information, and how to guard against cyberbullying.  Learn more about the product at PlayBeSeen.com.

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What I Learned from Raising a Child with Down Syndrome

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

October is also National Down Syndrome Awareness Month (in addition to being Breast Cancer Awareness Month).  The CDC estimates that 1 in 691 babies are born with Down syndrome each year, in which a baby is born with an extra chromosome (47 instead of 46), an occurrence that results in mental and physical challenges.

This guest post was written by Amy Julia Becker, a mother who lives in Lawrenceville, NJ with her husband and three children (one boy and two girls).  The oldest of her two daughters, Penny, was born with Down syndrome, and Becker shares her parenting experiences below.  Becker’s most recent book is A Good and Perfect Gift: Faith, Expectations, and a Little Girl Named Penny. She blogs at Thin Places, and you can visit her website at www.amyjuliabecker.com. 

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When our daughter Penny was diagnosed with Down syndrome two hours after she was born, I immediately worried about her future, her health, our ability to take good care of her, and our community’s willingness to accept her. I thought my world would shrink into a closed room with four walls labeled disability, special needs, developmental delays, and early intervention. But by the time she was one year old, I wanted to introduce her to strangers on the street so that they could share in her infectious smile and ready wave. I’m only five years into parenting a child with Down syndrome, but I’ve learned a few things that have helped me become a better mother to Penny (and to her younger brother and sister, who have developed typically).

Learn to Give and Receive

Before Penny was born, I treated life as if it were an equation. Hard work plus a happy childhood equaled a productive and satisfied adult. Penny helped me to understand that human beings aren’t products on an assembly line. We all have different needs and different abilities. Penny’s needs are more obvious than mine, and her body is more vulnerable. And yet her classification as “disabled” has served to show me my own weaknesses—my impatience, my tendency to judge people based upon surface impressions, my stubborn independence. I remember a time when a young woman with Down syndrome came to our house. She didn’t speak very clearly, and she needed assistance with some simple household tasks. But she sat on the floor with our son, William, who was being fussy, and her gentle, soothing presence brought him great peace. This event is one example of what I have learned–to see life as a web of relationships based upon giving, receiving, and mutual care. Penny has taught me not only to receive her as a gift, but to view every person in my life as a unique being with something to offer.

Stay Focused on One Thing at a Time

Early on, I learned that I couldn’t predict when Penny would reach developmental milestones. The half-dozen baby books on my shelf wouldn’t help me if I wondered when she “should” roll over or clap or eat with a spoon. For a while I thought I needed to let go of goals for her altogether because I didn’t want to equate her value as a human being with her ability to walk or talk. But eventually I realized that Penny would learn and grow, even if she did so at her own pace. My husband and I started to focus on helping Penny learn the next thing, whatever that might be. Now that she’s in kindergarten, we ask: What’s the next thing she needs to learn about reading? About numbers? About friendship?  It’s easy for all parents to spend too much time worrying about the distant future; trying to focus on one thing at a time has provided me emotional freedom.

Concentrate on Character Instead of Comparisons

When Penny was a baby, I often found myself analyzing other children her age and wondering how she measured up. If I discovered that she could do something another kid couldn’t, I felt self-satisfied and superior. On the other hand, when other kids her age could run across the room and Penny still hadn’t begun to crawl, I felt panic rattling inside my chest. I finally realized that whenever I met another child, I asked, “What can she do?” and the comparison would push me away from that child and parent. If I changed my question to “Who is she?” it allowed me to focus upon the child’s character. Every child became valuable and interesting once I stopped comparing them.

Now, with a happy, healthy child who has just started kindergarten, I wonder sometimes why I felt so scared. Having a child with Down syndrome has expanded my world, and my heart.

More About Down Syndrome on Parents.com

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