Posts Tagged ‘ autism ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Nao The Robot Teacher Becomes Newest Edition To Kansas School’s Teaching Staff 
The Career and Technical Education Academy in Hutchinson, Kan., has hired a new teacher who may fit in perfectly at an institution with such a technological name. The Hutchinson News reports Nao, a robot teacher, has arrived mid-year at the high school but is already making a big impact. (via Huffington Post)

The Real Long-Term Effects Of Adderall Use
Overachieving students are popping Adderall and other drugs to stay focused and get ahead. But how does this habit affect them long term? (via Huffington Post)

Student Sues School, Says Bullying Attack Leaves Him Disabled
An Iowa teenager is suing his school district and several administrators because he says they didn’t do enough to protect him from bullying and an assault that left him permanently disabled. (via Huffington Post)

After “Tan Mom,” New Jersey bans children from tanning beds
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie signed a bill into law on Monday banning children under 17 from using commercial tanning beds, a move stemming from the case of a local woman accused of taking her 5-year-old daughter into a tanning booth. (via Reuters)

‘What Color is Monday?’ A look at life with autism
New statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show an increase in the number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders – one in 50 – up from previous estimates of one in 88. (via Fox News)

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Join Parents Magazine for an Autism-Themed Facebook Chat on April 3

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

On April 3, Parents and Easter Seals will host an autism-themed chat on the Parents Facebook page from 1 to 2 p.m ET.

Three experts will be available to answer questions; each expert will have their own status on the Parents Facebook page where readers can leave questions on the following topics specific to autism.

The experts are:

Lisa Quinones-Fontanez, who blogs for Autism Wonderland and frequently appears on the Parents.com blog To The Max, is mom to 7-year-old Norrin who was diagnosed with autism in May 2008. She will answer questions about her experience parenting a child with autism.

Georgina Peacock, M.D., MPH, a developmental-behavioral pediatrician, will join us from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDD) to answer questions about the early signs of autism and developmental milestones.

Patricia Wright, Ph.D., MPH, is a board certified behavior analyst and the National Director of Autism Services at Easter Seals. She will answer questions about autism treatment options and available services.

Join the Facebook event for the chat and remember to visit the Parents Facebook page on Wednesday, April 3 at 1 p.m. ET. We look forward to hearing your questions!

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Chicago School Closings: District Plans To Shutter 54 Schools
Citing budget concerns and falling enrollment, Chicago Public Schools officials announced Thursday they plan to close 54 schools next year and shut down 61 school buildings — the largest single wave of school closures in U.S. history. (via Huffington Post)

Camera Found In Maryland High School Bathroom Was Put There By Anne Arundel County Police Officer, Say Officials
An Anne Arundel County police officer has been placed on administrative leave after an investigation indicated he placed a camera in a boys bathroom at Glen Burnie High School, police said Thursday. (via Huffington Post)

Misregulated Genes May Have Big Autism Role
A new study finds that two genes individually associated with rare autism-related disorders are also jointly linked to more general forms of autism. The finding suggests a new genetic pathway to investigate in general autism research. (via Science Daily)

Antibiotics Not Worth Risk in Most Chest Colds: Study
Doctors need to give antibiotics to more than 12,000 people with acute respiratory infections to prevent just one of them from being hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Toddler Meals Have Too Much Salt, CDC Reports
Most ready-to-eat meals for toddlers have too much salt, government researchers say. (via Fox News)

Energy Drinks Linked With Heart Problems
Amid rising concerns about the promotion and consumption of energy drinks, researchers released new data Thursday suggesting energy drinks may negatively affect heart rhythm and blood pressure. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Adam Lanza’s Father, Peter Lanza, Meets With Newtown Victim’s Parents
The parents of one of the 20 first-graders killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre met with the gunman’s father for more than an hour in an effort to bring some closure to the tragedy, asking him about his son’s mental health and other issues. (via Huffington Post)

Humanoid Robot Helps Train Children With Autism
“Aiden, look!” piped NAO, a two-foot tall humanoid robot, as it pointed to a flat-panel display on a far wall. As the cartoon dog Scooby Doo flashed on the screen, Aiden, a young boy with an unruly thatch of straw-colored hair, looked in the direction the robot was pointing. (via Science Daily)

Study: Women Abused As Kids More Likely To Have Children With Autism
The study, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, is the first to examine the potential legacy that a mother’s experience with childhood abuse could have on the health of her own children. (via Yahoo News)

UK: Public OK With Creating Babies From 3 People
Britain’s fertility regulator says it has found broad public support for in vitro fertilization techniques that allow babies to be created with DNA from three people for couples at risk of passing on potentially fatal genetic diseases. (via Yahoo News)

Pediatricians’ Group Supports Gay Marriage, Adoption Rights
Children’s health and well-being are better off when parents who want to marry are allowed to do so regardless of their sexual orientation, a leading pediatricians’ group said today. (via Fox News)

Older Fathers More Likely to Have Autistic Grandchildren
Men who have children when they are older are more likely to have grandchildren with autism, according to a study which shows for the first time that risk factors for autism may build up over generations. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

‘Don’t Feed Me’ T-Shirt by Comedian Kym Whitley, Alerts Caregivers of Kids’ Food Allergies
Now kids can wear a warning of the foods that will harm them. All parents have to do is fill in the blanks. A new “Don’t Feed Me” T-shirt with a checklist of food allergies tells caregivers what not to serve, ABC News reports. To customize the shirt, parents simply fill in their child’s name and mark the boxes next to the appropriate allergies, such as “peanuts” or “gluten.” If an allergy is not included on the shirt, parents can write the food in one of the blank spaces. (via Huffington Post)

Atypical Brain Circuits May Cause Slower Shifting in Infants Who Later Develop Autism
Infants at 7 months of age who go on to develop autism are slower to reorient their gaze and attention from one object to another when compared to 7-month-olds who do not develop autism, and this behavioral pattern is in part explained by atypical brain circuits.(via Science Daily)

Health Officials: 1 in 50 School Kids Have Autism
A government survey of parents says 1 in 50 U.S. schoolchildren has autism, surpassing another federal estimate for the disorder. Health officials say the new number doesn’t mean autism is occurring more often. But it does suggest that doctors are diagnosing autism more frequently, especially in children with milder problems. (via FOX News)

Skim Milk May Not Lower Obesity Risk Among Children
Got milk? It turns out that low-fat versions may not be the answer to helping kids maintain a healthy weight. Long a staple of childhood nutrition, milk is a good source of calcium and vitamin D, which can help to build bone, and experts believed that lower-fat versions could help children to avoid the extra calories that came with the fat in whole milk. (via TIME)

Doctors Urge FDA to Limit Caffeine Content in Energy Drinks
A group of health experts urged the Food and Drug Administration Tuesday to take action and protect teens from the possible risks of drinking large amounts of caffeine from energy drinks, The New York Times reported. (via FOX News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Newtown Children Remain Scared As School Tries to Move on from Sandy Hook Shooting
They relocated the entire student body to a new school unstained by blood. They brought in counselors to soothe shattered nerves, and parents to comfort the distraught. But authorities know they cannot erase the lingering effects of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School – students and faculty members still on edge, still traumatized by the sounds of gunshots and by the horrors they survived. (via Huffington Post)

Michelle Obama ‘Vogue’ Interview: First Lady Says Family is No.1 Priority
Michelle Obama is pushing back against the notion that she and President Barack Obama don’t socialize enough in Washington. The first lady says in an interview in the April issue of Vogue magazine that she and the president were straightforward when they said – before moving from Chicago to Washington in 2009 – that their family, including two young daughters, would be their priority. (via Huffington Post)

Drug Treatment Corrects Autism Symptoms in Mouse Model
Autism results from abnormal cell communication. Testing a new theory, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have used a newly discovered function of an old drug to restore cell communications in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the devastating disorder. (via Science Daily)

No Attention-Boosting Drugs for Healthy Kids, Doctors Urge
The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world’s largest professional association of neurologists, is releasing a position paper on how the practice of prescribing drugs to boost cognitive function, or memory and thinking abilities, in healthy children and teens is misguided. (via Science Daily)

Rare Meat Allergy Linked to Ticks Found in Kids
Some children living in the U.S. Southeast have a rare meat allergy linked to tick bites, according to a new study. Bites from ticks, usually lone star ticks, cause the body to become allergic to a protein called alpha-gal — which also happens to be found in some mammals, including cows, pigs and sheep, the researchers said. (via Fox News)

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Parenting a Child With Asperger’s (When You Have It, Too)

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

This post comes from writer Jamie Pacton, a professor and writer in Milwaukee. She’s also the mom of two sons, 4-year-old Liam, who has severe autism, and 2-year-old Eliot. She was quite moved by a new book about what it’s like for a father who has Asperger’s syndrome to raise a son who also has the diagnosis, and wants you to know about it, too.

New York Times-bestselling writers John Elder Robison and his younger brother, Augusten Burroughs, had a rough childhood. Their challenges with an abusive father and mentally ill mother are detailed in Burroughs’ famous book Running with Scissors. In Robison’s first memoir, Look Me in the Eye, and its companion book, be different, Robison discussed some of the hardships of his childhood, but his real focus was to explain how having Asperger’s syndrome helped him achieve amazing things (like designing the rocket-launching guitars for the band KISS, to name one example from his very interesting life). In his latest memoir, Raising Cubby: A Father and Son’s Adventures with Asperger’s, Trains, Tractors and High Explosives, Robison turns away from his rock-and-roll past and sheds some light on how having Asperger’s helped him cultivate an outlaw style of parenting.

Raising Cubby is, as Robison told me during an interview, simply the story of “how I went down to the kid store, picked out my kid, Jack (Cubby), and got him to the age of 17, when Cubby was almost thrown into a maximum-security prison for being a Boy Scout-genius with a chemistry set who earned the ire of the local prosecutor.”

This father-and-son story is by turns hilarious, poignant, weird, shocking, and inspiring. It’s full of unlikely parenting adventures: taking a preschooler to power plants, coal mines, and train yards (Cubby piloted his first diesel engine before most kids ride a bike); driving Chairman Mao’s refurbished Mercedes to a car show; inventing an alternate history for Santa Claus; raising a genius who taught himself to read using just the the Harry Potter books, but who later dropped out of high school; and, also fighting an epic legal battle to prove that Cubby was just a harmless geek, not a nefarious criminal.

This book will make you laugh, and make you think about how to parent a child who doesn’t fit into the neat categories we expect our children to occupy.

There are also practical reasons to read and share this book. You’ll learn the recipe for an infallible “monster spray” to soothe toddler night terrors. You’ll put the book down convinced that your kid needs to sign up for off-road Land Rover Driving School before he or she gets their license. And, perhaps most importantly, you’ll learn the secret to getting your kids to call you by the best title ever: “wondrous dada” (or, as I’m teaching my sons, “wondrous mama”).


Image courtesy of Crown Publishing Group.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

6-Year-Old Transgender Girl, Not Allowed To Use School Bathroom
At first, Jeremy and Kathryn Mathis didn’t think much of their son’s behavior. Coy took his sister’s pink blanket, and shunned the car they gave him for Christmas. (via Huffington Post)

Is One of the Most Common Drugs Prescribed During Pregnancy Safe for Your Baby?
Many expectant mothers are wary of taking drugs during the early weeks of pregnancy, as this time period can be crucial for the development of their baby. However, sometimes it’s hard to know for sure just what kind of effects medications can have on an unborn child. (via Fox News)

Texas Ten Commandments Resolution Calls For Prayer, Religious Displays In Schools
Texas state Rep. Phil Stephenson (R) filed a resolution on Monday calling for more “acknowledgement” of Christianity in public schools, encouraging Ten Commandments displays, prayer, and use of the word “God.” (via Huffington Post)

Children With Autism Show Increased Positive Social Behaviors When Animals Are Present
The presence of an animal can significantly increase positive social behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), according to research published February 20 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Marguerite E O’Haire and colleagues from the University of Queensland, Australia. (via Science Daily)

School Safety Addressed At House Education Committee Hearing; Arne Duncan’s Sequestration Hype
On Wednesday, members of the House Education & Workforce Committee mulled over ways to keep schools safe in light of the horrific Newtown, Conn. elementary school shooting, reports Politics K-12. (via Huffington Post)

First Lady Announces Effort to Help Kids Exercise
Imagine students learning their ABCs while dancing, or memorizing multiplication tables while doing jumping jacks? Some schools are using both methods of instruction and Michelle Obama would like to see more of them use other creative ways to help students get the recommended hour of daily exercise. (via Yahoo!)

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