Posts Tagged ‘ autism spectrum disorder ’

Join Parents Magazine for an Autism-Themed Facebook Chat on April 3

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

On April 3, Parents and Easter Seals will host an autism-themed chat on the Parents Facebook page from 1 to 2 p.m ET.

Three experts will be available to answer questions; each expert will have their own status on the Parents Facebook page where readers can leave questions on the following topics specific to autism.

The experts are:

Lisa Quinones-Fontanez, who blogs for Autism Wonderland and frequently appears on the Parents.com blog To The Max, is mom to 7-year-old Norrin who was diagnosed with autism in May 2008. She will answer questions about her experience parenting a child with autism.

Georgina Peacock, M.D., MPH, a developmental-behavioral pediatrician, will join us from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDD) to answer questions about the early signs of autism and developmental milestones.

Patricia Wright, Ph.D., MPH, is a board certified behavior analyst and the National Director of Autism Services at Easter Seals. She will answer questions about autism treatment options and available services.

Join the Facebook event for the chat and remember to visit the Parents Facebook page on Wednesday, April 3 at 1 p.m. ET. We look forward to hearing your questions!

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

No Exercise, More Than Couch, Tied To Fat In Kids
For kids, time spent inactive seems less of a factor in higher body fat than does a lack of exercise, according to a new study. Researchers found that the more minutes kids spent exercising at the pace of a fast walk each day, the lower their body fat percentage was. But the time they spent as couch potatoes made no difference, according to results published in the Journal of Pediatrics. (via Reuters)

Childhood Trauma Leaves Legacy of Brain Changes
Painful experiences early in life can alter the brain in lasting ways. A difficult reality for psychiatrists and counselors of child abuse is that young victims are at high risk of becoming offenders themselves one day, although it’s unclear why. But now a team of behavioral geneticists in Switzerland report a possible reason: early psychological trauma may actually cause lasting changes in the brain that promote aggressive behavior in adulthood. (via TIME)

Sleep Stealers: What’s Keeping Children From Getting Enough Shut-Eye?
The latest research homes in on the biggest sleep robber. Children are sleeping less, and there’s no shortage of reasons why: with television, video games and the internet, they are finding it harder to shut down and go to sleep. (via TIME)

Some Children Lose Autism Diagnosis: Small Group With Confirmed Autism On Par With Mainstream Peers
Some children who are accurately diagnosed in early childhood with autism lose the symptoms and the diagnosis as they grow older, a study supported by the National Institutes of Health has confirmed. The research team made the finding by carefully documenting a prior diagnosis of autism in a small group of school-age children and young adults with no current symptoms of the disorder. (via Science Daily)

Risk To All Ages: 100 Kids Die of Flu Each Year
How bad is this flu season exactly? Look to the children. Twenty flu-related deaths have been reported in kids so far this winter, one of the worst tolls this early in the year since the government started keeping track in 2004. (via Yahoo News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, July 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

‘No Child’ Law Whittled Down by White House
In just five months, the Obama administration has freed schools in more than half the nation from central provisions of the No Child Left Behind education law, raising the question of whether the decade-old federal program has been essentially nullified. (via NY Times)

Schizophrenia, Autism May Be Linked in Families
Families with a history of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are also more likely to have a child with autism, new research from Sweden and Israel suggests. (via Reuters)

Does Being an Intense Mom Make Women Unhappy?
According to a new study, women who believe in intensive parenting — i.e., that women are better parents than men, that mother should be child-centered, and that children should be considered sacred and are fulfilling to parents — are more likely to have negative mental health outcomes. (via ScienceDaily)

Video: Watch a Face Formed in Womb
An eerie animation based on scans of a developing embryo has captured the formation of the face in the womb. The video, produced for the BBC series “Inside the Human Body,” reveals how sections of the face grow and fit together like a puzzle just three months after conception. (via ABC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Using Brain Activity Patterns to Identify Autism in Kids as Young as 2
In a large new study, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital used EEG to identify specific patterns of brain activity that can distinguish children with autism. (via TIME)

‘Big Brother’? No, It’s Parents
An array of surveillance software now exists to let parents keep tabs on their children’s activities online, raising questions about appropriate parenting. (via NY Times)

Parents—Not TV—May Determine Whether Kids Are Active or Couch Potatoes
Researchers at Oregon State University have examined how parenting style—whether a strict but loving parent or a less-involved and more permissive parent—was associated with sedentary behavior, and have confirmed that children are becoming increasingly sedentary. (via Science Daily)

Swallowed Magnets Growing Problem for Kids, Docs Warn
In a new study, researchers at a U.K. hospital report two cases of children who required surgery after ingesting multiple magnets, and experts say parents should be aware of the risks. (via Fox News)

Midwife Mania—More U.S. Babies Than Ever Are Delivered by Midwives
A recent report showed that a greater proportion of women are choosing to rely on midwives in what experts think is a direct reaction to rising rates of C-section births. (via TIME)

Court Bars Mandatory Life Without Parole for Kids
he Supreme Court on Monday threw out mandatory life in prison without parole for juveniles. The ruling continued its trend of holding that children cannot be automatically punished the same way as criminal adults without considering their age and other factors. (via AP)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CT Scans Increase Children’s Cancer Risk, Study Finds
Researchers say the small but significant increases in the risk of leukemia and brain cancer do not mean that CT scans should be avoided entirely, but that the test should be performed only when necessary.

Boy Scouts Consider Opening Organization to Gays
The Boy Scouts of America will consider dropping its longtime opposition to allowing gays and lesbians to serve in the organization after it received a petition signed by 275,000 people at its national annual meeting.

DNA Blueprint for Fetus Built Using Tests of Parents
Researchers put together most of a fetus’s genome using a mother’s blood and father’s saliva, heralding an era when parents might know much more about a child long before its birth.

Less Folic Acid in Pregnancy Tied to Autism: Study
In a new study of California moms, women whose children had autism recalled getting less folic acid through food and supplements early in their pregnancies than those whose kids didn’t develop the disorder.

Baby’s Cells May Transfer to Mom During Pregnancy
During pregnancy, and even decades later, a baby’s influence on mom runs deep — cell deep. While the fetus develops inside the womb, its cells mix and mingle with the mother’s after traveling through the placenta, and can stay there for years.

Report Finds Kids’ Vaccines May Have Been Improperly Stored
Free vaccines meant for children as part of a U.S. government program may have been stored at the wrong temperature, which could make them less effective, according to a report released on Wednesday.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fever in Pregnancy Tied to Autism Risk
Running a fever during pregnancy is associated with a risk of autism spectrum disorders and developmental delays in the offspring, a new study reports.

Disney to Quit Taking Ads for Junk Food Aimed at Kids
The Walt Disney Co. is announcing today that it plans to advertise only healthier foods to kids on its TV channels, radio station and website.

Mystery E. Coli Infection Claims 6-Year-Old Mass. Boy
The death of a 6-year-old Massachusetts boy after a mystery E. coli infection continues to stump health officials searching for the source.

Study: Childhood Cancer Survivors Face New Risks
Women treated with chest radiation for cancer when they were girls have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than previously thought, doctors warn.

Opting Out of Vaccinations Could Get Tougher in California
The re-emergence of some vaccine-preventable diseases has prompted the California legislature to consider a bill that would make it more difficult for parents to opt out of vaccinating their kids.

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New Discovery May Help Detect Autism Earlier

Friday, May 18th, 2012

As a health editor, autism is a common topic of conversation, and I’m always interested to hear about new research on the disorder. A few months ago, I had the chance to meet with Dr. Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related disorders at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, about a study that has just been released that could be helpful in detecting autism spectrum disorders earlier—an important finding, since early interventions are key to treatment. Here’s what I learned: In typical development, if you lay a six-month-old down on his back and pull him up gently by his arms, he’ll have enough head and neck control to bring his head up with his body. But in the study, researchers found that those at risk factor for developing the disorder (in this case babies with an older sibling on the autism spectrum) may not have the same control, and they’ll keep their head tilted back as they’re being pulled up. Curious to know the connection between head control and autism, Dr. Landa offered me this explanation: “Infants rely on motor development for social interactions and play development, so when we see motor delays during infancy, we want to address them.”

What’s great about the pull-to-sit test is that parents can do it at home and pediatricians can perform the same test in their offices. If you’re curious to try it, remember to make sure you have your child’s full attention. Otherwise, he may keep his head held back to look at an interesting toy or other person in the room. Another super important thing to remember: “We don’t want parents to think that just because their child shows a head lag he’s going to develop autism,” says Dr. Landa. “But it is important to talk to a pediatrician or other professional who can help parents better understand the implications.”

 

Click here to see an example of typical head and neck control.

This video shows an example of head lag.

 

Image: Baby holding feet

Videos: Kennedy Krieger Institute

 


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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, May 18th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: Drowning Still a Leading Cause of Death for Toddlers
Drowning remains the leading cause of death in children under age 4 other than birth defects, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Baby’s Poor Head and Neck Control May Be an Autism Clue
Early research suggests that if a 6-month old baby has “head lag,” or weak head and neck control, it may be an early sign of autism or another language/social developmental delay.

Breastfed Babies May Gain Less Weight
Babies who are fed milk from their mothers’ breasts gain less weight over their first year compared to babies fed milk — breast or formula — from a bottle, suggests a new study.

Having Children Makes You (Relatively) Happier
Two college professors, Chris M. Herbst and John Ifcher, are challenging the collective, if counterintuitive, wisdom. Being a parent, they say, really does make people happier than the alternative — in part because over the past few decades, those who aren’t parents have been becoming gradually less happy.

Study Finds Setbacks for Young Autistic Adults
One in 3 young adults with autism have no paid job experience or college or technical education nearly seven years after high school graduation, a study finds. That’s a poorer showing than those with other disabilities, including the mentally disabled, the researchers said.

Newborn Infant Dies After Dog Attack at Ohio Home
An Ohio coroner’s investigator says a 3-day-old infant died hours after she was attacked by a family dog while sitting in a swing.

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