Posts Tagged ‘ apple juice ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

High Levels of Arsenic Found in Fruit Juice
The apple and grape juice your kids are drinking may have arsenic at levels high enough to increase their risk of cancer and other chronic diseases, according to a new study by Consumer Reports.

Forceps Delivery Tied to Lower Brain Injury Risk
When babies need help coming into the world, forceps may carry less risk of newborn seizures compared with vacuum deliveries or Cesarean section, a new study suggests.

Study: 40% of Kids Who Attempt Suicide First Try in Elementary or Middle School
Almost 40% of kids attempting suicide make their first try in middle or even elementary school, according to research that suggests that kids who think they want to kill themselves are considering it long before previously assumed.

Student’s Death Turns Spotlight on Hazing
The death of a drum major in the Florida A&M marching band has turned a spotlight on a culture of hazing in the band and prompted four investigations into it.

Districts Pay Less in Poor Schools, Report Says
More state and local dollars are spent on salaries in higher-income areas, the federal Department of Education found.

Happy Meal Toys No Longer Free in San Francisco
A new San Francisco law goes into effect on Thursday that prevents fast-food restaurants from giving away trinkets, action figures and other toys in their kid’s meals unless their food meets nutritional requirements. Starting Thursday, parents who order Happy Meals at the 19 McDonald’s locations in San Francisco will have to request the toy and pay 10 cents.

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Is Apple Juice Poisonous? Experts Explain the Arsenic Controversy

Friday, September 16th, 2011

The highly publicized clash between Dr Oz and the FDA regarding acceptable levels of arsenic in apple juice has left many wondering, ‘Well, what exactly is safe?’. We called upon two health experts, Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, and author of Nutrition At Your Fingertips, and Connie Diekman, M.Ed, RD, LD, FADA, and director of University Nutrition at Washington University, to help clear up some of the confusion.

What do you make of the controversy between Dr. Oz and the FDA?

Connie Diekman: As a registered dietitian I appreciate Dr Oz’s passion for and interest in healthful eating but hate to see such controversy causing confusion and angst for parents. Parents are working hard to provide the right food choices and activity for their children and they need role models who provide information that is based on the science of nutrition in a simple to implement manner.

Can you explain the difference between “good” and “bad” arsenic in food? 

CD: There are two types of arsenic – organic and inorganic. The inorganic form is the one that is harmful, and while arsenic exists in both forms in foods, the inorganic arsenic is the main form found in drinking water. This higher concentration in drinking water is the reason that the EPA, and subsequently the FDA, established limits of safety for drinking water.

Organic arsenic is found in a variety of foods, including fish, seafood, fruits, fruit juices, vegetables, and rice. Organic compounds are easily digestible and do not accumulate in the body as inorganic compounds can, thus intake of organic arsenic, especially at the low levels it exists in foods, is not a concern.

What are the acceptable FDA levels of arsenic in food?

CD: There is no scientific evidence available to allow FDA to set limits for food. The very small amounts in food, combined with the majority being organic, makes it difficult to conduct studies that consistently show a level of risk or safety.

Why would the FDA have higher acceptable levels of arsenic in apple juice as compared to drinking water?

Elisa Zied: The FDA says the levels vary because humans drink and consume a lot more water than they drink other beverages, including apple juice. Because water is more commonly consumed and the quantities consumed are so much higher than they are for juice or other beverages, it’s more important to limit potentially harmful chemicals in it to minimize their total exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 

CD: The EPA set the level for water based on the average consumption amounts of water, which are significantly higher than those of juice. In addition, since the arsenic in water is predominately inorganic it is easy to measure amounts.

What parents should do with regard to giving their kids apple juice?

EZ: Apple juice–like all juice and other calorie-containing beverages–should be limited in the diet. The AAP recommends 4 to 6 ounces of 100 percent fruit juice to kids ages 1 to 6 ; older kids should limit it to no more than 8-12 ounces if they consume it.

It’s wise to encourage fresh fruit as main source of daily fruit intake because its higher in fiber and more filling. But 100 percent fruit juice can fit into a healthful diet; to lower the amount consumed  you can combine with water or seltzer. Like with all food or beverages, it’s wise to mix up what kids consume from each of the different key food groups. For example, one day have an apple and some strawberries, the next day a banana and some apple juice or orange juice, the next day grapes and some honeydew, the next day some dried fruit and watermelon. Consuming different foods and beverages within the same category mixes up the nutrients you get and can potentially minimize risks of exposure to low levels of contaminants you may find in different foods and beverages.

CD: Apple juice can be a part of a healthful eating plan but as with all fruit juices it should not be a child’s main fruit source. Nutritional and health benefits of whole fruits are better than those of juice, so encouraging kids to enjoy fruit should be the first step.

Readers, what do you think? Do you trust that the FDA has your child’s safety covered or, given Dr. Oz’s concerns, are you now hesitant to give your child apple juice?

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