Posts Tagged ‘ anxiety ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Record Year for Whooping Cough; Health Experts Say “Get the Shot”
The U.S. is on course for a record year for whooping cough, health officials said this week. And while vaccinating kids is clearly the most important defense, health experts say adults may not realize they’re supposed to be getting regular shots, too. (via MSNBC)

Math Makes Girls More Anxious Than Boys
A new English study has found that girls suffer from mathematics anxiety more than boys, confirming some previous research. The analysis also found that high math anxiety was a stronger predictor of poor test performance for girls than boys. (via Live Science)

HPV Vaccine Benefits Even Women Who Don’t Get the Shots
The human papillomavirus vaccine provides a benefit to women even if they are not vaccinated, via a phenomenon known as herd immunity, a new study suggests. Among the women in the study, there was a decrease in the percentage who were infected with the four HPV strains included in the vaccine (HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) in the years after the vaccine was introduced, compared with earlier years. (via MSNBC)

Facebook Use Leads to Depression? No, Says Study
A study of university students is the first evidence to refute the supposed link between depression and the amount of time spent on Facebook and other social-media sites. (via Science Daily)

Sit Less Than 3 Hours a Day, Add 2 Years to Your Life, Study Says
Reducing the daily average time that people spend sitting to less than three hours would increase the U.S. life expectancy by two years, the study found. And reducing the time spent watching TV to less than 2 hours daily would increase life expectancy by 1.4 years. (via MSNBC)

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National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week (May 6-12)

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

Child Mind InstituteThis week, speak up for children’s mental health issues.  According to Parents advisor Harold Koplewicz, M.D., president of the Child Mind Institute (CMI), “Stigma, lack of awareness, and fear around mental health care prevent many parents and teachers from getting kids the support they need.”

In a joint survey of 1,000 parents between Parents magazine and the Child Mind Institute, 45% of parents said normal children are being labeled as mentally ill or having learning disorders because teachers can’t handle them. In addition, 50% of parents believe many doctors downplay the risks associated with putting kids on medication to treat ADHD and depression. (Read more results from the mental health survey.)

To help dispel the stigma, we’ve worked with the Child Mind Institute to bring you resources for helping kids with psychiatric and learning disorders such as anxiety, ADHD, OCD, and more.  Watch a video of Dr. Koplewicz talking to Diane Debrovner, Deputy Editor of Parents magazine, about the survey results and ADHD.  And go to our new Children’s Mental Health page (parents.com/mental-health) for more information on specific disorders and to watch videos from CMI.

Visit childmind.org/speakup to show your support for mental health awareness and to find events near you.

For more on Children’s Mental Health:

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

ADHD Diagnoses Up 66 Percent Since 2000
According to a new study, the number of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased by 66 percent over the past 10 years.

Brazil: Computer Chips Track Students
Grade-school students in a northeastern Brazilian city are using uniforms embedded with computer chips that alert parents if they are cutting classes, the city’s education secretary said.

Principal’s Decree: This Is a ‘No Hugging School’
More than 900 students at a New Jersey middle school have been told no more hugging.

Early Bacteria Exposure Important for Building Immunity, Study Says
Moms, don’t worry too much about getting those surfaces sanitary: New research suggests early exposure to bacteria is critically important to children to keep autoimmune diseases at bay, throughout life.

Brains of Kids With Math Anxiety Function Differently, Says Study
Kids who get the jitters before a math test may actually have different brain functions than kids without math anxiety, according to a new study.

Parents Should Lead By Example in Weight Loss, Study Finds
Losing weight themselves is the best way for parents to help their children shed excess pounds, new research suggests.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Brain Injuries in Childhood Have Lasting Effects on Learning
Brain injuries can lead to widespread deficits in a range of functions — from language to motor skills and cognition — and the effects may be longer-lasting than researchers thought, especially in young children who suffer traumatic blows to the head.

Should Parents Lose Custody of Super Obese Kids?
Should parents of extremely obese children lose custody for not controlling their kids’ weight? A provocative commentary in one of the nation’s most distinguished medical journals argues yes, and its authors are joining a quiet chorus of advocates who say the government should be allowed to intervene in extreme cases.

Anxiety, Other Disorders More Common in Autism
Autism tends to go hand in hand with a variety of other mental and behavioral conditions in kids, suggests a new study that highlights the fuzzy nature of autism diagnoses themselves.

Lots of Fun in the Sun, but Little Use of Sunscreen by Kids
The majority of pre-adolescents don’t regularly use sunscreen, according to a new study, despite the fact that many of them suffered sunburns at some point during their childhood, which increases the risk of developing melanoma later in life.

Tiny Baby Melinda Star Guido Heading Home
At birth, Melinda Star Guido weighed less than a can of soda – only 9 1/2 ounces. After spending close to the first five months of her life at the hospital, she’s headed home.

Girl Who Outsmarted Alleged Kidnapper: ‘I Got my Fight From Daddy’
A 9-year-old girl is getting credit for her quick thinking and for speaking up after managing to escape from her alleged kidnapper last week.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, August 5th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Kids from Drug-Making Homes Mostly Healthy: Study
Most children raised in homes where illegal drugs are produced appear to be in good health, according to a small Canadian study.

Child a Handful? Laid-Back Parenting Can Make Matters Worse
Rates of depression and anxiety are reduced when kids are parented in a style that matches their personality, a new study shows.

Football Practice in the Heat: Should Moms Worry or Relax?
It’s August, the month when mothers of football-playing teenage boys have to make peace — or not — with fears of heat stroke.

Toy Keys with Remote Recalled due to Choking Hazard
About 1,080,000 sets of toy keys with remote and an additional 3,600 in Canada are being recalled by Battat Inc. after reports of keys and key rings breaking.

PA Joins States Facing a School Cheating Scandal
A total of 89 schools in Pennsylvania— 28 in Philadelphia — have been flagged by the state for, among other things, an improbably high number of score erasures on state exams, as well as questionable gains on reading and math tests.

Children Eating More, and More Frequently, Outside the Home
According to a study conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and published in the August 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, eating location and food source significantly impact daily energy intake for children. Foods prepared away from home, including fast food eaten at home and store-prepared food eaten away from home, are fueling the increase in total calorie intake.

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Questions for Parents of Kids 2 or Younger

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

100sq_BPH027Our friends at Chicago’s Erikson Institute, a graduate school devoted to improving the health and education of children up to age 8, have launched a new survey and they want to hear from parents of children age 2 and younger. The goal of the survey is to study, essentially, how well a parent feels about his or her parenting skills.

Lead researcher Tracy Moran, Ph.D., assistant professor at Erikson, explains why she’s hoping you’ll participate: “Your input will help illustrate the peaks and valleys of parenting in those first two years. The benefits will be far-reaching, to generations of future parents and their children.” Through survey results, Dr. Moran will:

  • identify specific tasks that are especially difficult for most parents
  • gain knowledge that will aid physicians, nurses, and other professionals in supporting parents
  • help professionals identify parents at risk for postpartum adjustment, depression, and anxiety

You can fill out the survey here. Please note that the first page says that the survey can take between 30 to 40 minutes to complete, but having taken it myself, I can say that it’ll probably only require half that time.

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupUnder Pressure, Firm Shutters Line That Made Tainted Wipes
A Wisconsin medical supplier that made millions of recalled alcohol prep products now blamed for serious infections and at least one death is shutting down the line that produces the wipes — at least for now. But the parents of two children harmed by infections blamed on contaminated Triad products said the move is too little, too late, and raises more questions about why government regulators haven’t taken stronger action against the firm. [MSNBC]

Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk
Women in the study who drank more than a cup of coffee a day had a 22% to 25% lower risk of stroke than those who drank less, according to findings reported Thursday in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, behind heart disease and cancer. The findings add to the growing body of research showing coffee appears to have hidden health perks. A study done by Larsson in 2008 on men who drank coffee or tea had similar results. One of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants that improve health. Other research has suggested coffee can help prevent cognitive decline and can boost vision and heart health. It is also associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. [USA Today]

Dog Kisses: Is  It Safe to Smooch with a Pet?
According to an article in WebMd, not even doctors and veterinarians agree about kissing a dog on the lips or vice versa. Thinking that dog’s tongue is clean is off base, says veterinarian William Craig, but don’t stop there. “Dog spit isn’t chemically cleansing. It turns out that it’s the dog’s rough tongue that helps to physically remove contaminants from an open wound” and likely the reason why many wounds do not get infected,” he told Pawnation. Craig adds “people tend to brush their teeth regularly and rinse with mouthwash. Dogs tend to lick themselves and eat things off the ground.” “Humans and dogs have different bacteria in their mouths,” explains Nelle Wyatt, a veterinary technician at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center. “Not all of the bacteria are capable of causing disease in the other species.” [USA Today]

Boy Toddlers Need Extra Help Dealing With Negative Emotions, Experts Urge
The way you react to your two-year-old’s temper tantrums or clinginess may lead to anxiety, withdrawal and behavior problems down the road, and the effect is more pronounced if the child is a boy who often displays such negative emotions as anger and social fearfulness, reports a new University of Illinois study. [Science Daily]

Passive Smoking Increases Risk of Stillbirth and Birth Defects, Study Suggests
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. [Science Daily]

Teacher Who Twice Threw a Chair at 7th-Grader Tries to Clear Her Name
A longtime teacher at a Joliet junior high who last year “snapped” and twice threw a chair at a seventh-grade boy, striking him once in the head, is trying to clear her record so she can teach again. After Filak tried to get the boy to do his work, he instead told her to “leave me alone, fool,” witnesses said, according to a judge’s ruling that found the chair-throwing incident was child abuse. [Chicago Tribune]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupParents Are Junkies
In the last few months, parents and researchers have been at war. Evidence has piled up to show that becoming a parent does not make people happier; it makes them unhappier. [Slate]

Early Puberty: How It Could Affect a Child’s Health
Puberty can be an awkward time in any child’s life, but early puberty is even more challenging. Imagine going through those changes before anyone else understands them. [WLTX]

fMRI Predicts Outcome To Talk Therapy In Children With An Anxiety Disorder
A brain scan with functional MRI (fMRI) is enough to predict which patients with pediatric anxiety disorder will respond to “talk therapy,” and so may not need to use psychiatric medication, say neuroscientists from Georgetown University Medical Center. [Medical News Today]

Even Short-Term Poverty Can Hurt Kids’ Health
Being poor for even a short period of time can have lasting health implications for children, according to a new report by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. 15.5 million children are living in poverty in the United States, that’s one in five children according to the Census Bureau. [CNN Health]

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