Posts Tagged ‘ antibiotics ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Chicago School Closings: District Plans To Shutter 54 Schools
Citing budget concerns and falling enrollment, Chicago Public Schools officials announced Thursday they plan to close 54 schools next year and shut down 61 school buildings — the largest single wave of school closures in U.S. history. (via Huffington Post)

Camera Found In Maryland High School Bathroom Was Put There By Anne Arundel County Police Officer, Say Officials
An Anne Arundel County police officer has been placed on administrative leave after an investigation indicated he placed a camera in a boys bathroom at Glen Burnie High School, police said Thursday. (via Huffington Post)

Misregulated Genes May Have Big Autism Role
A new study finds that two genes individually associated with rare autism-related disorders are also jointly linked to more general forms of autism. The finding suggests a new genetic pathway to investigate in general autism research. (via Science Daily)

Antibiotics Not Worth Risk in Most Chest Colds: Study
Doctors need to give antibiotics to more than 12,000 people with acute respiratory infections to prevent just one of them from being hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Toddler Meals Have Too Much Salt, CDC Reports
Most ready-to-eat meals for toddlers have too much salt, government researchers say. (via Fox News)

Energy Drinks Linked With Heart Problems
Amid rising concerns about the promotion and consumption of energy drinks, researchers released new data Thursday suggesting energy drinks may negatively affect heart rhythm and blood pressure. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study: Happy Youngsters More Likely to Grow Into Wealthy Adults
In the first study of its kind, scientists discovered that the happiest kids tend to have greater wealth later in life. (via ScienceDaily)

Children Around Globe Worry About Education, Environment
According to an international poll education, food and the environment are top concerns for children around the globe, and particularly for youngsters growing up in developing countries. (via Reuters)

Study: Soggy Pants Not Parents’ Fault
A new study reveals that the wrong type of toilet training does not lead to incontinence later on. There have traditionally been two methods for toilet-training – parent oriented and child oriented. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests the child-oriented approach, but until now there has been little research to support either. (via NYTimes)

Antibiotics in Pregnancy Tied to Asthma in Kids
A Danish study reveals that children whose mothers took antibiotics while they were pregnant were slightly more likely than other kids to develop asthma. The results don’t prove that antibiotics caused the higher asthma risk, but they support a current theory that the body’s own “friendly” bacteria have a role in whether a child develops asthma, and antibiotics can disrupt those beneficial bugs. (via NBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, June 18th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

China Suspends Family Planning Workers After Forced Abortion
A public outcry ensued when graphic photos of a 23-year-old woman and her dead fetus were posted online. (via NY Times)

Big Jump Seen in Oregon Parents Delaying Vaccines
An increasing number of parents may be choosing to delay or limit certain vaccinations for their young children, a new study shows, even as cases of pertussis, or whooping cough, continue to rise nationwide, with recent outbreaks in California and Washington. (via msnbc.com)

Kids Taking Fewer Antibiotics, More ADHD Meds
American children are taking fewer antibiotics now than 10 years ago, but prescriptions to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, have increased, according to a new report by the Food and Drug Administration. (via CNN)

Bariatric Surgery Safe for Teens, Study Finds
As obesity continues to be a significant problem for kids and teens, a new study shows gastric bypass surgery to be safe and beneficial for morbidly obese teenagers. (via The Today Show)

Kids With One Kidney Can Still Play Sports: Study
Having only one kidney shouldn’t deter healthy youths from playing sports, according to a new study that flies in the face of widespread safety concerns. (via Reuters)

The Midwife as Status Symbol
Midwifery is no longer seen as a fringe practice favored by hippies, but as an enlightened, more natural birthing technique for the hip. (via NY Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Sleep Medication: Mother’s New Little Helper
Nearly 3 in 10 American women fess up to using some kind of sleep aid at least a few nights a week, according to “Women and Sleep,” a 2007 study by the National Sleep Foundation, a nonprofit research group.

Extra Brain Cells May Be Key to Autism
Children with autism appear to have too many cells in a key area of the brain needed for communication and emotional development, helping to explain why young children with autism often develop brains that are larger than normal, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.

Soda Bans in Schools Have Limited Impact
State laws that ban soda in schools — but not other sweetened beverages — have virtually no impact on the amount of sugary drinks middle school students buy and consume at school, a new study shows.

Infant Growth Can Predict Later Obesity, a Study Indicates
Babies who grow too fast have a much higher risk of becoming obese, a study indicates.

Fatherhood Helps Men Cut Back on Drinking, Smoking and Crime
A new study suggests that fatherhood’s transformative power is responsible for new dads’ decreased rates of tobacco and alcohol use and crime.

Antibiotics Overprescribed for Children: Study
Pediatricians in the United States write more than 10 million unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions every year for conditions such as the flu and asthma, contributing to potentially dangerous drug resistance, a study said.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: Doctors prescribing fewer antibiotics to kids
A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study released Thursday found that since the early 1990s, there’s been a 10 percent drop in prescription rates for antibiotics for kids 14 and younger.

Do Parents Put Too Much Pressure on Students?
In China, 68 percent of adults think parents pressure students too much, and just 11 percent think they don’t push them hard enough.

Domestic worker bill sparks outrage from parents
A bill making its way through the state legislature is supposed to
protect the rights of domestic workers, but critics said it will make it tough for parents to hire a babysitter.

Is “diet” a dirty word?
Here’s an update on the earlier post today about the controversial, new book (not yet available) “Maggie Goes on a Diet,” (Alohan, 2011) and how many experts, including the one quoted extensively in the previous post, believe that encouraging overweight children to diet can be psychologically damaging.

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Do All Ear Infections Need Antibiotics?

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

News about whether antibiotics are effective in treating children with ear infections have been making the rounds again.

The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported a trial where children under the age of 2 were split into two groups.  One group was given antibiotics while the other group was given placebos.  The group that received antibiotics had reduced symptoms (though not by a significant amount) and were also less likely to have prolonged infection. 

The trial confirmed that children under 2 should be treated with antibiotics immediately as long as there has been a definite diagnosis of ear infections (also know as acute otitis media).  Guidelines for determining ear infections will be revised and updated.

Our own medical expert, Dr. Ari Brown, a prediatrician in Austin, Texas, recently shared her own recommendations for children with ear infections.  For children under 2, she suggests treating them with antibiotics at once.  For children over 2, she suggests a wait-and-see approach to determine if the children get better on their own before needing antibiotics. 

More About Antibiotics and Ear Infections:

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupMore professors give out hand-held devices to monitor students and engage them
Though the technology is relatively new, preliminary studies at Harvard and Ohio State, among other institutions, suggest that engaging students in class through a device as familiar to them as a cellphone — there are even applications that convert iPads and BlackBerrys into class-ready clickers — increases their understanding of material that may otherwise be conveyed in traditional lectures. The clickers are also gaining wide use in middle and high schools, as well as at corporate gatherings. (New York Times)

Preemie births inch down, but still a big problem
Premature births may finally be starting to inch down, says a new report from the March of Dimes. The change is small: In 2006, 12.8 percent of U.S. babies were born premature, compared with 12.3 percent in 2008. Still, that translates into 21,000 fewer preterm births, said March of Dimes president Dr. Jennifer Howse — what she called the first real sign of progress after three decades of rising prematurity. (MSNBC)

Pregnancy not covered by most individual health policies
Individual health insurance policies generally don’t cover maternity care, as a recent investigation by the House Committee on Energy and Commerce reported. In an October memo outlining its findings based on responses from the four largest for-profit health insurers — Aetna, Humana, UnitedHealth Group and WellPoint —the committee reported that most individual policies at those companies didn’t cover most of the expenses for a normal delivery. (MSNBC)

Study: Antibiotics have little impact on child ear infections
Giving children antibiotics for ear infections does little to speed their recovery while raising the risk of some side effects, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (CNN)

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Let’s Talk About Drugs

Monday, November 15th, 2010

Pop quiz for you:

Which of these conditions are not helped by antibiotics?

A. Bronchitis

B. Flu

C. Colds

D. Non-strep sore throats

The answer is: It’s a trick question—none of those ailments warrant antibiotics, because they’re all caused by viruses, and viruses don’t respond to antibiotics. In fact, if you take the drugs, not only will you feel no better, you’ll just set yourself up for possible failure later on, when you have an illness that really could be helped by the meds.

Antibiotic resistance is on its way to becoming one of the world’s biggest public health threats—it’s estimated that roughly half of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed—and this is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has designated November 15 to 21 its third annual “Get Smart About Antibiotics Week.”

The CDC breaks down the illnesses that benefit from antibiotics and the ones that don’t here. Even if you think you know this info already, it’s worth taking a peek to make sure you’ve got all the facts.

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