Posts Tagged ‘ allergies ’

Chewable Zyrtec Tablets Unavailable Until 2012

Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

zyrtec-chewableParents who depend on Children’s Zyrtec Chewable Tablets to treat their kids’ allergies will need to speak to their pediatricans about other safe, alternative over-the-counter medication. Mitch Lipka on Consumer Ally reports the tablets are not being recalled, but being made unavailable until 2012 because of changes in production and manufacturing. 

According to Consumer Ally, after McNeil recalled Children’s Benadryl Allergy Fastmelts, Motrin Junior Strength Caplets, and other medication last year, Johnson & Johnson recommitted to producing medication “to the levels of quality and compliance that consumers expect….”   Johnson & Johnson’s McNeil Consumer Healthcare recently made the decision to stop outsourcing production of Zyrtec Chewable Tablets and begin manufacturing them in-house, which means they won’t be ready until next year.

In the meantime, kids age 6 and older can still take other types of Zyrtec tablets and liquid gels.  Read more on Consumer Ally.

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

AAP Clinical Report: Children’s Eating Disorders On The Rise
In the past decade, a growing number of children and adolescents have been diagnosed with eating disorders. In a new clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), “Identification and Management of Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents,” published in the December 2010 issue of Pediatrics (published online Nov. 29), it is estimated that 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States have anorexia nervosa, and 1 percent to 2 percent meet criteria for bulimia nervosa. [Medical News Today]

AAP Report: Managing Food Allergies At School
Food allergy is estimated to affect roughly 1 in 25 school-aged children and is a common trigger of anaphylaxis, a severe, potentially fatal, systemic allergic reaction. Studies of children with food allergy indicate that 16 percent to 18 percent have had a reaction in school. In a new clinical report, “Management of Food Allergy in the School Setting” in the December 2010 issue of Pediatrics (published online Nov. 29), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) gives guidance on managing food allergies at school and on the prevention and treatment of food-induced anaphylaxis. [Medical News Today]

Elevated Blood Pressure Suffered By Up To 8 Percent Of Canadian Children
“We blame kids for being fat, we blame kids for being inactive, we blame kids not eating right or the families for not feeding their kids right,” says Terrance Wade, the Canada Research Chair in youth and wellness at Brock University. “But a lot of these things are not based on individual choices because your life choices and such are constrained by your life chances.”  [Medical News Today]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

College Students Help Non-Verbal Children Communicate Many For The First Time
Students majoring in communication disorders at Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, are ahead of their peers nationwide who are working toward careers in speech pathology because of a one-of-a-kind program that gives the undergraduates more hands-on experience than most graduate students in the field. [Medical News Today]

Parental Divorce in Childhood Linked to Stroke in Adulthood
Children who experience a parental divorce are over twice as likely to suffer a stroke at some point in their lives, according to new research presented in New Orleans at The Gerontological Society of America’s (GSA) 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting. [Science Daily]

Johnson & Johnson Recalls More Children’s Medicines
Just days after Johnson & Johnson’s (JNJ) Children’s Tylenol started returning to pharmacies’ shelves, the health care giant recalled about 4 million packages of Children’s Benadryl allergy tablets and some 800,000 bottles of Junior Strength Motrin, citing manufacturing problems. [Daily Finance] (more…)

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupParents Are Junkies
In the last few months, parents and researchers have been at war. Evidence has piled up to show that becoming a parent does not make people happier; it makes them unhappier. [Slate]

Early Puberty: How It Could Affect a Child’s Health
Puberty can be an awkward time in any child’s life, but early puberty is even more challenging. Imagine going through those changes before anyone else understands them. [WLTX]

fMRI Predicts Outcome To Talk Therapy In Children With An Anxiety Disorder
A brain scan with functional MRI (fMRI) is enough to predict which patients with pediatric anxiety disorder will respond to “talk therapy,” and so may not need to use psychiatric medication, say neuroscientists from Georgetown University Medical Center. [Medical News Today]

Even Short-Term Poverty Can Hurt Kids’ Health
Being poor for even a short period of time can have lasting health implications for children, according to a new report by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. 15.5 million children are living in poverty in the United States, that’s one in five children according to the Census Bureau. [CNN Health]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

New study suggests most preschool-age children exceed daily screen time recommendations: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents limit combined screen time from television, DVDs, computers, and video games to 2 hours per day for preschool-age children. In a study soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that many children are exposed to screen time both at home and while at child care, with 66% exceeding the recommended daily amount. [Medical News Today]

Plugged up: Doctors see signs of worsening constipation in children: Mild constipation in children is fairly common, but gastroenterologists at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center have been seeing what they believe is the start of a troubling trend: more children with more serious and chronic bouts of the condition. Experts attribute the problem to lack of physical activity, inadequate water intake and fiber-poor diets. [Medical News Today]

Allergies and wheezing illnesses in childhood may be determined in the womb: The new research, funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the British Lung Foundation, and undertaken at Southampton General Hospital, reveals that fetuses which develop quickly in early pregnancy but falter later in pregnancy are likely to go on to develop allergies and asthma as children. Scientists believe this is due to changes in the development of their immune system and lungs. [Medical News Today]

What can country of birth tell us about childhood asthma?: Researchers from Tufts University pooled data from five previous epidemiological studies to investigate the prevalence of asthma in children in the Boston neighborhoods of Chinatown and Dorchester. Among children born in the United States, low socioeconomic status (SES) and exposure to pests (mice and cockroaches) were both associated with having asthma. Neither association was present in children born outside of the United States. [Science Daily]

Knowledge gaps, fears common among parents of children with drug-resistant bacteria: Knowledge gaps and fear some of it unjustified are common among the caregivers of children with a drug-resistant staph bacterium known as MRSA, according to the results of a small study from the Johns Hopkins Children Center. These caregivers thirst for timely, detailed and simple information, the researchers add. [Medical News Today]

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Spankin’ New Headlines

Monday, November 30th, 2009

6a00d8341c30cf53ef0120a6b7ab97970b-250wiSlow down: The response to the rise of the helicopter parent. Time

Your pediatrician’s necktie: Could it be making your child sick? Wall Street Journal

It’s time to stop smoking! The decline in the smoking rate among Americans has stalled and there was even a hint of an increase last year, according to the CDC. New York Times

Cafeteria scare! Agriculture chief promises to tell school districts when the government suspects food supplies are contaminated. USA Today

Four percent of U.S. kids now have food allergies, according to a new study. Los Angeles Times

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Natural Remedy for Allergies and Colds

Friday, May 16th, 2008

NasopureIt’s been a brutal allergy season, and now I’ve also got a cold. So I decided it was time to try Nasopure, a "nasal wash system" that literally cleans the inside your nose with salt water to loosen stuffiness and flush out pollen, dust, bacteria, and viruses. This concept has been getting a lot of buzz lately. A recent study found that regularly washing your nose reduces the length of colds and can actually prevent them, and Dr. Mehmet Oz demonstrated the use of the Neti Pot on Oprah. But Nasppure, developed by Dr. Hana Solomon, a pediatrician who has been recommending this for 20 years, is much easier to use. Watch a video here of a 4-year-old using it. And she now makes a smaller version called Little Squirt to go for children as young as 2. "The saline solution makes thick mucus thinner so it’s easier to blow out, and it also unplugs the opening to the sinuses so they can drain out," she explained to me this morning. It’s also helpful for children with asthma (whose symptoms are often worsened by allergens and air pollution), and those who are prone to getting ear infections after a cold (ear infections typically happen when mucus plugs the opening to the Eustachian tubes, which connects the back of the throat to the middle ear). You can keep it in the bathtub, and let your child get used to playing with it before using it.

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