Posts Tagged ‘ air pollution ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Proposal Would Make Preschool Available to All American Children Within Five Years
The plan was released by the Center for American Progress, which has close ties to the White House. Education Department officials have signaled that President Obama will make pre-kindergarten programs a priority during his second term. (via NY Daily News)

NYC First to Get Realistic Shooting Simulation Game for Kids
A shooting simulation game that lets children pretend to have shootouts in an indoor fake village with a bank, offices and what appears to be a school has come to Queens and is raising concern among law enforcement authorities. (via NBC New York)

New Whooping Cough Strain in US Raises Questions
Researchers have discovered the first U.S. cases of whooping cough caused by a germ that may be resistant to the vaccine. Health officials are looking into whether cases like the dozen found in Philadelphia might be one reason the nation just had its worst year for whooping cough in six decades. The new bug was previously reported in Japan, France and Finland. (via Fox News)

Restaurant’s ‘Well-Behaved Kids’ Discount Goes Viral; Mom Shares Her Secrets
Laura King expected a tally of good food on her restaurant tab. A credit for her children’s good manners, on the other hand, came as quite a surprise. (via Today)

Black Parents Claim Disneyland Character Refused to Touch Their Kids
An African-American family is suing Disneyland after, the family claims, an actor who portrayed the White Rabbit character from “Alice in Wonderland” refused to hug or touch their children because of their skin color, reports CBS Los Angeles station KCBS-TV. (via CBS News)

Air Pollution May Lower Birth Weight
A pregnant woman’s exposure to outdoor air pollution may increase the risk of her baby being born at a lower birth weight, according to a large multinational study. (via MyHealthNewsDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Exposure to Traffic Air Pollution in Infancy Impairs Lung Function in Children
Exposure to ambient air pollution from traffic during infancy is associated with lung function deficits in children up to eight years of age, particularly among children sensitized to common allergens, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

Drug Shortage Led to Spike in Kids’ Infections
When there was a shortage of a drug used to prevent IV-related infections in kids, the frequency of those infections increased almost ten-fold at one hospital, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

No Clear Link Between Organic Food, Birth Defect
Baby boys whose moms ate organic during pregnancy do not seem to have a lower risk of a birth defect of the penis, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Preemies from Low-Income Families at High Risk for Dangerous Brain Bleeds
Babies born prematurely to low-income parents have a disproportionately high risk for developing dangerous brain bleeds that require multiple surgeries and extensive follow-up, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Clinical Trial Is Favorable for a Prenatal Gene Test
A new method of prenatal testing that can detect more genetic problems in a fetus than ever before could be headed toward wider use after encouraging results from a clinical trial, researchers say. The new technique surpassed standard testing in detecting chromosomal abnormalities, the study found. (via NY Times)

Fertility Treatments May Put Women At Risk for PTSD Symptoms, Study Suggests
Women who undergo fertility treatments may find the situation so distressing that they develop post-traumatic stress disorder, a new study says. In the study, close to 50 percent of participants met the official criteria for PTSD, meaning they could be diagnosed with the condition. (via MSNBC)

Diabetes and the Obesity Paradox
Type 2 diabetes, a condition widely thought of as a disease of the overweight and sedentary, also develops in people who aren’t overweight—and it may be more deadly. Scientists found those who were of normal weight around the time of their diagnoses were twice as likely to die within the same period. (via NY Times)

Boys Appear to Be More Vulnerable Than Girls to the Insecticide Chlorpyrifos
A new study found, at age 7, boys had greater difficulty working memory, a key component of IQ, than girls with similar prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlorpyrifos. Having nurturing parents improved working memory, especially in boys, though it didn’t lessen the negative effects of exposure. (via Science Daily)

Air Pollution Linked to Stillbirth Risk
Air pollution has been linked to a number of breathing problems, mainly in developing countries, and now a new preliminary study looking at pollution levels in New Jersey has found an increased risk of stillbirths among women exposed to certain pollutants. (via NBC News)

Stressed People Use Different Strategies and Brain Regions
Researchers have found stressed and non-stressed people use different brain regions and different strategies when learning. Non-stressed individuals applied a deliberate learning strategy, while stressed subjects relied more on their gut feeling. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

More Parents Follow Updated Car Seat Guidelines, Survey Finds
A year after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration updated its child-safety seat guidelines recommending that children remain in rear-facing car seats until age 2 and older kids stay in booster seats as long as age 12, AAA has some good news. Its survey has found that 90% of parents with kids younger than 13 know about the changes.

Secondhand Smoke Again Tied to Asthma in Kids
A fresh look at past studies suggests kids who live with a smoker are more likely to wheeze or get asthma, providing more evidence for the link between secondhand smoke and breathing problems.

Prenatal Pollutants Linked to Later Behavioral Ills
Inner-city women who breathe powerful airborne pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons while pregnant are more likely to have children who develop behavioral problems by the time they reach school age, researchers report.

For Moms with Postpartum Depression, the Nation’s First Inpatient Unit
For moms battling depression, a first-of-its-kind psychiatric unit at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers intensive, inpatient care.

Komen Foundation Continues to See Fallout from Planned Parenthood Controversy
Fallout from the Planned Parenthood controversy continues at the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation, with several executives at headquarters and affiliates departing, questions arising about fundraising ability, and structural changes underway to give affiliates more influence, officials said Wednesday.

Parents Upset Over New Case of Math Homework Referencing Slavery
A Clayton County parent is upset after he says his son was given a math homework assignment that referenced slavery.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, January 13th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Poor Air Quality in Schools Sickens Kids
Dr. Sanjay Gupta investigates schools that are making children sick.

Bald and Beautiful… Barbie? Mattel Responds to Lobbying Campaign
A movement is afoot on Facebook to create a “Bald Barbie” as a role model for young girls going through chemotherapy or suffering from hair loss conditions such as alopecia.

Natalee Holloway Declared Legally Dead
An Alabama judge signed an order Thursday declaring Natalee Holloway legally dead, attorneys for her family said.

U.S. Attorney Activates ‘School Corruption Hotline’
The United States Attorney in the Western District of Pennsylvania has activated a hotline where citizens can report “suspected possible corruption in public education.”

Can Elmo Inspire Your Kid to Become a Scientist?
Sesame Street is debuting a new curriculum this season, and it’s designed to help tots build essential skills in science and math.

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, December 20th, 2010

‘Maldistribution’ Found in Doctors Who Treat KidsGoody Blog Daily News Roundup
Nearly one million American children in areas, often rural, where there are no local primary care physicians whereas many urban areas have an abundance of such doctors — an average of one physician for every 140 children in some places, an analysis of national data revealed. (Medpage Today)

Air Pollution May Tie Highway Proximity to Autism
Children born within just one-fifth of a mile of a  highway appear twice as likely to have autism, according to a team of researchers from Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) and the UC Davis MIND Institute. (PsychCentral)

Reading, Writing, ‘Rithmetic and Relationships
Children go through ups and downs like everyone else. But even in elementary school, some kids are shy and awkward, and they can easily become social outcasts, anxious about social interactions and maybe a tad depressed. Normal adolescent angst can spiral out of control for these young people, taking them on a trajectory that can lead to major depression by adolescence — unless, research suggests, they have a simple but valuable asset: a friend. (New York Times)

AAPD Partners With Text4baby To Provide Pregnant Women And New Moms With Oral Health Messages
The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), the recognized leader in children’s oral health, announced an outreach partnership with the text4baby program. The AAPD’s leading pediatric oral health experts will work closely with text4baby in the dissemination of information to pregnant women and new moms about children’s oral health care.  (Medical News Today)

House Rejects Senate Bill To Fight Child Marriage, Citing Cost As Main Concern
“A bill to combat the practice of child marriage in developing countries stalled in the House on Thursday,” CQ Today reports. In a 241-166 vote “the House rejected … the motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill (S 987). Suspension of the rules is an expedited procedure that limits debate and requires a two-thirds majority for passage,” the news service writes (Dumain, 12/16). (Medical News Today)

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