Posts Tagged ‘ aggression ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

And the Most Popular Baby Names of 2012 Are…
BabyCenter, a popular pregnancy and parenting website, released its annual rankings of baby names today. (via Time)

Autism Severity May Stem From Fear
Most people know when to be afraid and when it’s okay to calm down, but new research on autism shows that children with the diagnosis struggle to let go of old, outdated fears. (via ScienceDaily)

US Birth Rate Hits a Record Low
The rate of babies born in the United States hit a record low in 2011, new analysis shows. Researchers say the drastic drop in the birth rate among immigrants has greatly contributed to the overall decrease. (via NBC News)

Prenatal Exposure to Testosterone Linked to Verbal Aggression
A new study examined finger length to link verbal aggression and prenatal testosterone exposure. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Preschoolers Use Scientific Reasoning, Study Says
A review article in the journal Science sums up a swath of research suggesting that preschoolers can make deductions about cause and effect, infer preferences and test hypotheses. (via CNN)

Possible Link Between Infants’ Regulatory Behaviors and Maternal Mental Health
It is believed that maternal anxiety and depression can influence the child’s capacity to self-regulate, but infant problems can also exaggerate parental mental health issues. (via Science Daily)

U.S. Is Tightening Web Privacy Rule to Shield Young
Federal regulators are about to take the biggest steps in more than a decade to protect children’s privacy online. (via New York Times)

Researchers Investigate Aggression Among Kindergartners
Not all aggressive children are aggressive for the same reasons, according to researchers, who found that some kindergartners who are aggressive show low verbal abilities while others are more easily physiologically aroused. The findings suggest that different types of treatments may be needed to help kids with different underlying causes for problem behavior. (via Science Daily)

Physical Activity Interventions for Children Have ‘Little Impact’, Study Suggests
Physical activity interventions for children have small impact on overall activity levels and consequently the body fat and mass of children, a study suggests. (via Science Daily)

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

Low blood levels of Vitamin D linked to chubbier kids, faster weight gain - Kids who are deficient in vitamin D accumulated fat around the waist and gained weight more rapidly than kids who got enough vitamin D, a new University of Michigan study suggests. [Science Daily]

Fearless children show less empathy, more aggression - Preschool-aged children who demonstrate fearless behavior also reveal less empathy and more aggression towards their peers. This has been shown in a new study that was carried out at the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education. “The results of this study show that fearless behavior in children can be identified and is related to neurological and genetic predisposition. This type of behavior has less correlation at least in infancy with standards of educational processes or parenting practice,” says Dr. Inbal Kivenson-Baron, who carried out the study. [Medical News Today]

Breastfeeding moms don’t get less or worse sleep than moms who use formula, study finds - Breastfed infants are reported to awaken more often and to sleep less. But does that mean breastfeeding mothers get less sleep, too? Not necessarily, according to the study, “Infant Feeding Methods and Maternal Sleep and Daytime Functioning,” in the December issue of Pediatrics. [Medical News Today]

New research highlights importance of parent-child communication to combat obesity - As part of its proprietary survey program, Student ViewPOINT™, ARAMARK Education, a leading provider of school food and nutrition services, surveyed almost 40,000 middle school and high school students across the country. The research revealed that parent-child communication has a significant influence on the nutrition habits of children. [The Medical News]

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