Posts Tagged ‘ adolescent stress ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 24th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Tough New York Private Schools Try to Lighten Load
Some of New York City’s most competitive high schools, like Dalton, Trinity and Horace Mann, are working to address student stress.

BPA Exposure in Womb Linked to Behavioral Woes in Girls
Girls who are exposed to high levels of bisphenol A (BPA) while in their mother’s womb may be more likely to show signs of behavioral and emotional problems as toddlers, new research finds.

U.S. Panel Urges ‘Energy Star’ Nutrition Ratings for Food Labels
Taking a cue from the Energy Star ratings on the front of household appliances, a panel of experts is recommending that a similarly easy-to-read system appear on every packaged food item in American grocery stores so busy consumers can glean nutritional info at a glance.

Educating New Parents Cuts Shaken Baby Syndrome
A new study in the journal Pediatrics finds that when a simple education program was implemented, hospitals in New York State’s Hudson Valley were able to reduce shaken baby syndrome cases in their hospitals by 75 percent.

New Barbie Has Pink Hair and Tattoos, and Some Parents Aren’t Happy
Brought to you by the Italian-based, Japanese-inspired brand Tokidoki, this new edgy Barbie has a chin-length pink bob, punk-style clothing and tattoos running down her arm and around her collarbone.

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Could Your Child Be Stressed?

Monday, November 15th, 2010

Your young child can be more stressed than you think.  A new survey from the American Psychological Association reveals that kids as young as 8 are experiencing stress as a result of their parents’ stress.  For kids ages 8-12 with stressed parents, the survey showed that 47% feel sad, 36% feel worried, and 25% feel frustrated. 

In particular, overweight and obese children reported feeling more stress because of their parents than children with average weight.  As a result, the obese and overweight children experienced negative emotional and physical affects that included eating more, having trouble sleeping, getting headaches, and fighting with others. 

Parents seem unaware of their children’s stress.  The survey also discovered 69% of parents believed their stress didn’t impact the children, but 91% of children reported otherwise.  Also, children were less likely to reach out to their parents to talk about the stress or to maintain their health by eating well or exercising.

In order for families to continue growing closer, healthy changes need to be made to improve physical, emotional, and mental health.

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

GoodBlog imageDoes adolescent stress lead to mood disorders in adulthood?: “What is especially alarming is that depression in young people is increasing in successive generations. People are suffering from depression earlier in life and more people are getting it. We want to know why and how. We believe that stress is a major contributor.” Researchers are particularly interested in the link between childhood stress and the development of clinical depression and bipolar disorder. His team is evaluating the stress of children who are living in families where one parent is affected by a mood disorder. [Science Daily]

Do babies learn vocabulary from baby media? Study says no: We all want our children to be smart. Why else would parents spend millions of dollars on videos and DVDS designed and marketed specifically for infants and very young children every year? But do they work? NBC’s ‘Today’ show recently suggested that claims from the manufacturers of baby media products may be overblown, and now a new study published in Psychological Science presents empirical evidence that infants who watched an unidentified baby video did not actually learn the words that the video purported to teach. [Medical News Today]

Poor women often gain too many pregnancy pounds: A new study finds that young, low-income women often gain too much weight during pregnancy, raising concerns about the potential long-term impact on their obesity risk.Nearly two-thirds of 427 pregnant women, mostly black or Hispanic, seen at two U.S. medical clinics put on more than the recommended weight during pregnancy. And a year after giving birth, about half had retained at least 10 of their pregnancy pounds. [MSNBC]

Happy Meal ban won’t stop kid obesity: The decision of San Francisco city officials Tuesday to crack down on restaurant meals that include free toys unless they meet particular nutritional guidelines is — depending on whom you ask — either taking away a parents’ right to choose what to feed their children, as some msnbc.com readers have commented, or a gift to frazzled parents up against a massive marketing machine. [MSNBC]

Therapy for women prone to miscarriage questioned: Blood-thinning treatments for pregnant women with an inherited condition that makes them susceptible to blood clots may do more harm than good, Danish researchers report. Their study was designed to investigate the cause of repeat miscarriages in women with hereditary thrombophilia, a tendency to form blood clots,  not the safety of particular treatments. Nevertheless, in the course of that work they found little difference between women with or without the known gene mutations that cause thrombophilia, except for a higher likelihood of excessive bleeding during delivery among women carrying the mutations. The researchers attribute that heavy bleeding to the “standard practice” of administering blood thinners to pregnant women with thrombophilia. [MSNBC]

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