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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

16-Year-Olds Able To Vote in Takoma Park, MD
A small Maryland city just outside the Washington, D.C., city limits has voted to lower the voting age for city elections to 16. (via Huffington Post)

Elementary Math, Reading Skills At Age 7 Linked To Financial Success At Midlife, According to Study
It may seem hard to figure, but provocative new research suggests that an individual’s math and reading skills in elementary school are key indicators of his/her socioeconomic status (SES) in adulthood. In fact, the study — conducted by a pair of researchers at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland — showed that math and reading skills at age seven are the most reliable predictors of SES at age 42. (via Huffington Post)

Flu In Pregnancy May Quadruple Child’s Risk For Bipolar Disorder
Pregnant mothers’ exposure to the flu was associated with a nearly fourfold increased risk that their child would develop bipolar disorder in adulthood, in a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings add to mounting evidence of possible shared underlying causes and illness processes with schizophrenia, which some studies have also linked to prenatal exposure to influenza. (via Science Daily)

India Developing Cheap Vaccine Against Major Cause of Diarrhea Deaths in Kids
The Indian government announced Tuesday the development of a new low-cost vaccine proven effective against a diarrhea-causing virus that is one of the leading causes of childhood deaths across the developing world. The Indian manufacturer of the new rotavirus vaccine pledged to sell it for $1 a dose, a significant discount from the cost of the current vaccines on the market. (via Fox News)

Number of Abused U.S. Children Unchanged Since 2008
The number of U.S. children who were exposed to violence, crime and abuse in 2011 was essentially unchanged from 2008, according to a new government survey. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, May 13th, 2013

Jacob Barnett, 14-Year-Old With Asperger’s Syndrome, May Be Smarter Than Einstein
When Jacob Barnett was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with moderate to severe autism. Doctors told his parents that the boy would likely never talk or read and would probably be forever unable to independently manage basic daily activities like tying his shoe laces. But they were sorely, extraordinarily mistaken. (via Huffington Post)

Pollution May Increase Kids’ Risk For Diabetes
Living in a highly polluted area could increase a child’s risk for developing insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, Medical Daily reported. (via Fox News)

Obesity ‘obsession’ Causes Underweight Children To Be Overlooked, Researchers Claim
A group of researchers claim the public’s “obsession” with the obesity epidemic has caused many to overlook the issue of underweight school-aged children, BBC News reported. (via Fox News)

Teens Texting At The Wheel Tied To More Driving Risks
Teenagers who text while driving are also more likely to engage in other risky activities, such as riding with an intoxicated driver or not wearing a seatbelt, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Recording Reveals K12 Inc., Florida’s Online Education Provider, Struggled to Comply With Law
The Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and State Impact Florida have obtained internal emails and a recording of a company meeting that provide new insight into allegations that K12 Inc., the nation’s largest online education company, uses teachers in Florida who do not have all of the required state certifications. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

Brain Anatomy of Dyslexia Is Not The Same in Men and Women, Boys and Girls
Using MRI, neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center found significant differences in brain anatomy when comparing men and women with dyslexia to their non-dyslexic control groups, suggesting that the disorder may have a different brain-based manifestation based on sex. (via Science Daily)

Enhanced Motion Perception In Autism May Point To An Underlying Cause of the Disorder
Children with autism see simple movement twice as quickly as other children their age, and this hypersensitivity to motion may provide clues to a fundamental cause of the developmental disorder, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

Could Vaginal Delivery Be Safer for Preemies?
Very premature babies have fewer breathing problems when they’re born through vaginal delivery compared to cesarean section, a new study of more than 20,000 newborns suggests. Based on those cases, researchers found that regardless of why a C-section was performed – whether because of pregnancy-related complications or the mother’s medical problems, for example – vaginal delivery tended to be safer. (via Reuters)

Flu During Pregnancy May Rise Bipolar Risk For Baby
If expectant mothers catch the flu during pregnancy, their babies could be four times as likely to develop bipolar disorder later in life, BBC News reported. Bipolar disorder, typically diagnosed in the late teens or twenties, causes intense mood swings ranging from depression to feelings of manic joy. The majority of bipolar cases have no relation to the flu. (via Fox News)

‘Pinterest Stress’ Afflicts Nearly Half Of Moms, Survey Says
For many moms, social media is both a blessing and a curse. We go to sites like Pinterest and Facebook for connection and inspiration – but all too often, the beautiful images of domestic harmony make us feel inadequate. In our exclusive TODAY Moms survey of 7,000 U.S. mothers, 42 percent said that they sometimes suffer from Pinterest stress – the worry that they’re not crafty or creative enough. (via TODAY)

Born Into Captivity, 6 Year Old Can Recover, Experts Say
Of the four captives rescued in this week’s hostage drama in Cleveland, the 6-year-old daughter of Amanda Berry may raise the most perplexing questions of all. The young girl who followed as Berry, 27, kicked her way out of a house where she’d been held in alleged bondage for a decade will face complicated challenges as the youngster learns to navigate an entirely new universe, say child therapists and specialists in long-term trauma. (via NBC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

 

Cleveland Story Sparks Hope For Parents of Long-Lost Children
Elizabeth Smart. Jaycee Dugard. Shawn Hornbeck. Many parents of missing children repeat these names like a mantra — each one is evidence that their long-lost child is not a lost cause. Now Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michele Knight can be added to that list of found children. The discovery of the three Ohio women on Monday is exactly the kind of hope that keeps parents of missing children going, long after their search has stopped making sense to us outsiders. (via NBC News)

How Autism is Different In Girls vs. Boys
Why do boys get diagnosed with autism four times as often as girls? New research, including some of the latest data from the International Society for Autism Research annual conference last week, addresses this question, one of the biggest mysteries in this field. (via Fox News)

Kids’ Chemical Injuries Down, But May Rise in Summer
Injuries from gasoline, lamp oil and similar chemicals have dropped considerably among small children in the last decade, according to a new study. “It seems to decline right around 2000, 2001. That’s when the Consumer Products Safety Commission mandated products be placed in child-resistant packaging,” said Dr. Heath Jolliff, the study’s lead author and associate medical director of the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus. (via Reuters)

U.S. Has More ‘First Day’ Newborn Deaths Than Any Other Industrialized Nation, Report Says
In the United States, more babies die on the first day of life than in any other industrialized country, according to a new report. Each year, about 11,300 U.S. babies die the day they’re born, which is 50 percent more deaths than all other industrialized countries combined, according to the report from the charity organization Save the Children. (via Fox News)

Louisiana Court Rules That School Voucher Plan Violates State Constitution
Louisiana’s highest court ruled Tuesday that Gov. Bobby Jindal’s hallmark school voucher plan violates the state’s constitution because of how it is funded. The state Supreme Court found that the school voucher plan is illegal because it diverts tax dollars to private schools from Louisiana’s “minimum foundation program,” which was created under the state constitution to pay for public schools. (via The Washington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Scott Compton, South Carolina Teacher Who Stomped Flag During Lesson, Gets $85,000 Payment
A South Carolina high school teacher removed from the classroom when he stomped on an American flag while discussing freedom is being paid $85,000 to avoid a legal challenge. (via Huffington Post)

Tanishg Abraham, Nine-Year-Old Prodigy, Inducted Into Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (VIDEO)
When we last checked in on Tanishq Abraham, the nine-year-old wunderkind from Sacramento, he was publishing essays on NASA’s Lunar Science website, attending classes at American River College and enjoying his status as a Mensa genius. Now the child prodigy can add a new accomplishment to his list: Acceptance into Phi Theta Kappa honor society. (via Huffington Post)

FDA Warns On Use of Certain Migraine Drugs During Pregnancy
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on the use of migraine drug valproate sodium in pregnant women as it could result in lower IQ scores in the baby. (via Reuters)

Mom’s Work Is Never Done-and Now It’s Worth Less, Too
If moms earned wages for the work they do around the house and with the kids, they’d be getting a pay cut this year. The take-home pay that a mother would earn for everything from cooking to handling the family finances would total at $59,862 if she were paid on the open market, according to Insure.com’s analysis of government data on hourly wages. (via TODAY)

Majority of Doctors Do Not Follow Treatment Guidelines for ADHD
More than 90% of pediatric specialists who diagnose and manage attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in preschoolers do not follow the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) clinical-treatment guidelines. (via TIME)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Public School in Queens Adopts All-Vegetarian Menu, Becomes the First in NYC To Do So
A New York City elementary school has adopted an all-vegetarian menu, serving kids tofu wraps and veggie chili. Public School 244 is the first public school in the city to go all-veggie. The animal-welfare group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals says it might be the first all-veggie public elementary school in the nation. (via Huffington Post)

Newtown Educators To Be Honored By Medal Of Honor Society
The Congressional Medal of Honor Society plans to honor the six educators killed in the December massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut with its highest civilian award. (via Huffington Post)

Researchers Successfully Treat Autism in Infants: Playing Games That Infants Prefer Can Lessen Severity of Symptoms
Most infants respond to a game of peek-a-boo with smiles at the very least, and, for those who find the activity particularly entertaining, gales of laughter. For infants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), however, the game can be distressing rather than pleasant, and they’ll do their best to tune out all aspects of it — and that includes the people playing with them. (via Science Daily)

Twins Delivered 87 Days Apart
A woman in Ireland gave birth to twins 87 days apart, The Belfast Telegraph reported.
Dr. Eddie O’Donnell, a consultant obstetrician, said this birth was “probably the first of its kind” in Irish medical history and described the event as “extremely unusual.” (via Fox News)

NICU Treatments Linked to Intellectual Disabilities
Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) interventions for babies born very small and early have drastically reduced infant deaths in the United States, but in doing so they’ve contributed to more intellectual disabilities, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, April 29th, 2013

Report: State Preschool Funding Lowest in Decade On Per-Student Basis
State funding for pre-kindergarten programs had its largest drop ever last year and states are now spending less per child than they did a decade ago, according to a report released Monday. The report also found that more than a half million of those preschool students are in programs that don’t even meet standards suggested by industry experts that would qualify for federal dollars. (via Huffington Post)

Doctors: Respect Women’s Choice to Have Home Birth
Although hospitals and birthing centers are the safest places to have a baby, pediatricians said today that women who choose to give birth at home should be supported and that setting made as safe as possible, as well. (via Reuters)

Ohio Girl, 8, Gets Kidney Donation from Teacher
An Ohio girl is recovering after getting a critical kidney transplant — with the organ donated by her former kindergarten teacher. Nicole Miller — an 8-year-old first-grader at Mansfield Christian School — got the kidney last week from Wendy Killian, who was her kindergarten teacher last year. (via Fox News)

Xena, the Warrior Puppy, Rescued from Abuse, Helps 8-Year-Old Boy with Autism
Research regarding the effects of companion animals on kids with autism is limited but encouraging. One study published earlier this year revealed that children with autism spectrum disorder were more likely to talk, laugh, make eye contact and show other positive social behaviors in the presence of guinea pigs than they were in the presence of toys. (via NBC News)

Mom Convinces Son He has Cancer to Scam Money From Friends, Cops Allege
Police have charged a New Jersey mother who allegedly lied and said her son was suffering from cancer in order to deceive friends and loved ones out of thousands of dollars. Investigators say Susan Stillwagon, 35, stole as much as $3,500 through cupcake and bracelet fundraisers by claiming that her 9-year-old son had a type of lymphoma and needed medical care. (via NBC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

West Virginia Republican Proposes Making Kids Work for Food
A West Virginia lawmaker floated the idea during floor debate in the state’s House of Delegates of having school children work as janitors, the Associated Press reports. (via Huffington Post)

Infants’ Sweat Response Predicts Aggressive Behavior as Toddlers
Infants who sweat less in response to scary situations at age 1 show more physical and verbal aggression at age 3, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (via Science Daily)

Catherine, Herbert Second Child Dies After Parents Use Prayer, No Medicine
A couple serving probation for the 2009 death of their toddler after they turned to prayer instead of a doctor could face new charges now that another son has died. (via Huffington Post)

The Children of Killers: ‘There are Wounds You Can Never Heal’
The young daughter that Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev left behind may face a future of stigma, secrecy and haunting questions about the father she may never stop loving, say both a forensic psychiatrist and the daughter of a serial murderer. (via NBC News)

Bulletproof Whiteboards Installed in Minnesota School District
A Minnesota school district where two students were killed in a 2003 shooting unveiled a new device Tuesday aimed at adding a last-ditch layer of safety for teachers and students: bulletproof whiteboards. The Rocori School District has acquired nearly 200 of the whiteboards, made of a material touted by its manufacturer as stronger than that in police-issue bulletproof vests. The 18-by-20-inch whiteboards can be used by teachers for instruction and used as a shield in an emergency. (via Huffington Post)

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