Daily News Roundup

Research Uncovers Raised Rate of Autism
A new study suggests that the typical ways in which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and most other research groups measure autism prevalence, by examining and verifying records of existing cases kept by health care and special education agencies, may leave out many children whose parents and schools have never sought a diagnosis. (New York Times)

Babies’ blood tests can end in false-positive screening scares
As many as 200,000 babies in the US test results for newborn screenings turn out to be false-positives, only 1 in 50 positive tests are true.  If the results are correct the test can be invaluable to the child and his parents, but many endure painful months of unnecessary worry. (MSNBC)


Obesity in Children Can Be More Than Just Baby Fat, Researchers Say
Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine believe that body mass index screening with behavioral intervention starting between the ages of 2 to 5 years impacts obesity and related morbidity better than current guidelines suggesting that testing begin in older children. (Medical News Today)

ADHD With Poor Emotional Control Seems to Run in Families
A Massachusetts General Hospital Study found that adults with ADHD may also experience emotional reactions to everyday situations DESR.  This combination seems to run in families, researchers found that the siblings of people with both ADHD and DESR were much more likely to have both conditions than those with ADHD alone. (Health Day)

Kids’ tabletop chairs pose hazard, safety agency warns
The Consumer Product Safety Commission says children could be hurt in certain versions of the “metoo” clip-on tabletop chairs imported by Colorado-based phil&teds USA Inc. The CPSC says about a dozen children have been injured.  The chairs have metal clamps that attach to most tabletops.  The CPSC says those clamps can easily come loose, causing the chair to detach and sending the child plummeting to the floor. (MSNBC)

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