Daily News Roundup

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupInfant foods should be screened for mycotoxins, scientists say - An international team of scientists calls for protecting complementary food for infants in developing countries — especially those where corn is a staple food — against fumonisin, a toxin produced by fungi. Until now, physicians thought the growth retardation of children in those regions was to be blamed on the poor nutritional value of the complementary maize porridge they receive when breast milk is no longer sufficient. But toxins indeed are involved, the scientists report in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. [Science Daily]

Toymakers jockey for children’s envy, parents’ cash
Toys may be a bright spot during what is predicted to be another tough holiday season for consumer spending. Compared with other retail categories such as luxury and electronics, toys weren’t hit as hard during the economic downturn for one major reason: Many parents will cut back everywhere else before they deprive their children of that Buzz Lightyear action figure or the latest Bratz doll. Plus, toys are relatively cheap. [Bellingham Herald]

Finnish success in tackling childrens’ diabetes - A new Finnish study has found a connection between infants’ diets and childhood diabetes. In the study, carried out over ten years, researchers managed to prevent type 1 diabetes in children with a genetic disposition for the illness. [YLE Finland]

Lower protein in infant formula supports growth rate similar to breast milk, new study showsThe study established that infants fed a new, lower-protein infant formula attained the same growth rate and growth pattern as breastfed infants.  [Medical News Today]

Don’t clamp umbilical cords straight after birth, urges expert
Obstetricians and midwives should wait a few minutes before clamping the umbilical cords of newborn infants so that babies are not harmed by the procedure, argues Dr David Hutchon in an article published on bmj.com today. [Medical News Today]

Children unhappy at school turn to sex and alcoholYoung children who don’t like school are more likely to be involved in underage drinking and sexual activity. A study reported in BioMed Central’s open access journal Substance Abuse, Treatment, Prevention and Policy, has found that pupils’ general wellbeing and specific satisfaction with school were both associated with the incidence of risky behaviors. [Medical News Today]

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