Posts Tagged ‘ NYC marathon ’

Helping Hurricane Sandy Victims. Still.

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

There are a few causes I am passionate about. One is helping others through running. When I ran the NYC Marathon under Team For Kids we raised hundreds of thousands of dollars. The money went to fund health and fitness programs for kids in low-income areas. I got to run one of the most amazing marathons in the world and children benefited.

This year, a good friend of mine asked me to lace up my shoes and run the Staten Island Half Marathon for her team, Race2Rebuild. The organization was founded by NYC athletes to support the nationwide nonprofit, Rebuilding Together, a 25-year old safe and healthy housing organization that brings together volunteers and communities to improve the lives of low-income homeowners.

The race is on October 13 and for a bunch of reasons, including the fact I only run 3-5 miles right now and live in Los Angeles, I had to decline. However, her cause is worthy and I wanted to share it in case anyone wants to lace up or donate. Or both. If nothing else, you can “Like” their cause and “Follow” their movement. Every click counts.

We all know what Hurricane Sandy did to parts of the east coast, particularly Staten Island. It killed people and devastated entire towns. Beachfront residents there saw 15-foot waves tear their homes from their foundations. There are still thousands of displaced families. Volunteer groups like this are still out daily going through wreckage and ruin, helping families salvage whatever they can. We are coming up on the year anniversary of the storm, though in many ways and to many people, it still feels like yesterday.

The race on October 13th is to help rebuild a veteran’s home that was destroyed in the Midland Beach neighborhood of Staten Island. This is about as grassroots as it gets. In doing Like, Follow, Give, you are directly helping someone get back on their feet. The goal for Race2Rebuild on Oct 13th is to raise $15,000.

Here are the details to help:

Like: facebook.com/Race2Rebuild
Follow: twitter.com/Race2Rebuild
Give: www.crowdrise.com/Race2RebuildSIHalf

When you give on the Race2Rebuild Crowdrise site, click DONATE (top right) and select “Virtual Team.”

If you want to lace up for the race and join the team with a $1000 fundraising goal, registration details are here: http://www.race2rebuild.org/register/

As their motto states: RACE HARD. RACE WITH RESOLVE. RACE2REBUILD.

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Remembering the Boston Marathon…

Monday, April 15th, 2013

The feel of your soles hitting the pavement. The roar of the crowds. The pride in pushing your body to do something so extraordinary. You do it for a charity, for a lost one, a loved one–or just for yourself. This is what runners do. This is what marathoners do.

I ran the Boston Marathon in 2008. I did it with two of my best running friends, Katie and Rachel. We were part of a team that trained together for multiple marathons. We ran through ice and snow in the Bronx, through wind and rain in Brooklyn, logging the miles, counting the minutes and checking off the weeks.

I sit here today in shock and heartbreak over the news of two explosions at this iconic event. Reports are still sketchy–many injured, possible packages found… your mind goes to the immediate: terrorism. It’s tax day. It’s Boston. It could easily be domestic. It’s also the world’s most famous running event. So it could be international. Or maybe a gas line exploded. We don’t know. The facts will come.

What is on my mind now are the runners, the spectators, the emergency workers, the reporters, my fellow running friends and anyone else who was, until a few hours ago, enjoying being part of this storied event. On so many levels the Boston Marathon signifies what is good in the world: Persistence, Drive, Kindness, Endurance, Humility, Charity.  But right now, it also signifies the bad. Or the potential of badness that exists. I am trying not to jump to conclusions.

Soon I will put on my running shoes and hit the trail. I will think back to that day when I crossed the finish line: elated, exhausted, proud. For all of those who crossed today and for all of those who watched, it will be a different memory. One mired in death and destruction. Even one of the toughest events in the world remains, at this moment, so incredibly fragile.

 

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