Posts Tagged ‘ milk ’

Milestone Monday: The Rash Continues to Confound

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Hives, but not too itchy

I wrote last week about Fia’s mystery rash. Am reposting the picture. It comes on in a fury, then a dose of Benadryl and it is gone within 10 minutes. I told the doctor last week that I thought it had gone away for two days. He said that was the key: figuring out what she didn’t have during that time or 5 days before hand. That’s how long an allergy can stay in your body. Well, I have a decent memory, but nothing that good. So moving forward, I’m trying to see if it goes away for any extended period of time. So far, it hasn’t.

She is seeing an allergist on Thursday for a consult, Friday for testing. I happen to be allergic to every environmental thing except mold: dust mites, pollen–even my transexual cat. I get shots. Phil is allergic to Penicillin. The doctor explained that our allergies combined give Fia a really good chance of having them. Even though ours aren’t food,  hers could be. And he reiterated the rash looks a food allergy, not environmental.

The only consistent thing about it is the timing. It appears in a few spots right after her nap, typically around 3 pm. Random spots on her body. I put cortisone cream on and they go away. Then right before bed, around 6:30-7, it comes on strong, taking up whole swaths of her skin. That’s when I bring out the Benadryl.

It can’t be her crib. We have washed her bedding twice in detergent, once in just hot water. We put all her stuffed animals in the dryer. We are using the dye/perfume free kind–we have used it for years.

For the last 3 days we have eliminated dairy, but it doesn’t seem to make a difference. Plus, doesn’t a dairy allergy usually involve diarrhea? I’m now going to eliminate nuts/peanut butter.

Here is her basic menu from the past 6 days (don’t judge me on some of the things like pickles for breakfast. She asked!):

Wed, April 11th:

Breakfast: 2 scrambled eggs with milk, partial granola bar

Lunch: macaroni and cheese, hot dog (no bun)

Dinner: ham, rice, pea soup, Lactaid instead of milk (now we’re doing straight rice or soy milk, as I learned Lactaid still has the milk protein)

6 pm: rash appeared (gave Benadryl)

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Thursday April 12th: (still waiting to hear from her school what she had for lunch that day)

Breakfast: Oats and Honey Cereal/Lactaid, cheese stick

1 pm–(pre-nap) rash appeared in a big way. It’s the picture I took above–and took it with me to the doctor to show him what it looked like. Gave her Benadryl, so it didn’t appear the rest of the day/night. I’m sure the antihistamine was still in her system at bedtime and kept it at bay. If it came during the night, I wouldn’t know.

Snack: Ella’s Squeeze (made up of sweet potatoes, pumpkin, apple, blueberry), Avocado, 2 cherry tomatoes

Dinner: chicken nuggets, black beans, pea/rice/ham soup, small piece of pepperoni pizza, chocolate chip cookie

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Friday April 13th:

Breakfast: cereal and milk, pretzels, shortbread vanilla cookie (not the most nutritious of breakfasts, I know).

Snack: apples, Swiss cheese, turkey

small rash @ 3:15 pm

Lunch: rice/pea/ham/spinach soup, smoothie (banana, yogurt, blueberries, OJ, milk), half sandwich on whole wheat bread with ham/turkey/lettuce/ranch dressing

4 pm rash appeared in a few spots

Early Dinner: half sandwich on whole wheat bread with ham/turkey/lettuce/ranch dressing

5:15 pm: spots began popping up. Gave Benadryl before they spread.

6:45 pm: bottle (8 oz of milk)
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Saturday, April 14th:

Breakfast: dill pickles (lord, she eats like she’s pregnant!), granola bar, flax seed waffle

Lunch: tortilla chips, rice and black beans, smoothie with a tiny bit of yogurt in it.

Dinner: chicken nuggets, avocado, an orange

At 6 pm, rash began. By 6:30 it spread on her arms, then legs then lower back. Gave Benadryl.

7 pm–bottle with rice milk (6 oz)

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Sunday April 15th:

Breakfast: peanut butter puffins & rice milk, eggs w/spinach and turkey, whole grain toast w/strawberry jelly

Lunch: half peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole grain, Ella’s purple squeeze

2:30–small cluster of rash on back and on wrist. Put on cream.

Post nap snack/early dinner:  rice/black beans/carrots, orange-banana squeeze, key lime soy yogurt (2 bites).

7 pm–cluster of rash all over shoulder blades. Gave Benadryl, put her to bed.

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Monday, April 16th:

Breakfast: apple/cinnamon organic oatmeal, Oaty Bites organic cereal w/ soymilk

Snack: blueberry-banana squeeze

Lunch: turkey, carrots, veggie chips

No rash yet. But she is napping. Any ideas anyone?

 

 

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Milestone Monday: First Dentist Appointment

Monday, April 9th, 2012

 

Fia had her first dentist appointment last week. She was a champ. How could she not be with a choo-choo train chugging overhead, a flat screen television in the dental chair, and a tub of toys to pick from on her way out? We went to Dr. Thomas Tanbonliong in Larchmont. He’s known for being one of the best dudes with kids. He definitely lived up to his reputation.

Now let me backtrack for a moment. I wrote about my frustration with all of the various (7) pediatricians I’ve been to since Fia was born. A couple of them were adamant that she gets rid of the pacifier (she calls him “Bag-dee”) by the age of 1. If not by 1, then 18 months. Well, with multiple airplane trips around that time, there was no way I was firing Bagdee.

Then came the move and a new baby, and to her credit, our pediatrician out here said to let it go for a while. If we took Bagdee away when Emmett came, Fia would see him with one and feel the shaft. Why rock the boat when the waves are already 20-feet high?

But my trouble in general with giving up the pacifier has always been the thumb. I mean you can’t cut that off. Literally. How could she play her guitar? Or drums. Or well, do a lot of things? I happen to think we need our thumbs. The few times we tried “Bye bye Bagdee,” in addition to the whining, she’d start to suck on her thumb.

Enter Dr. Thomas, who said, “Don’t worry about the pacifier until she’s 3. We don’t want her to go for the thumb.” THANK YOU!! At last, a doctor…errr, dentist, who makes sense to me.

It helps that Fia only uses it to get to sleep and then it falls out. She doesn’t have it in during the day, and Dr. Thomas confirmed she has no overbite or any signs of overuse with the paci.

I’d like to get the opinion of my fellow blogger, Julia Landry on here. She’s a dentist.

Julia, what do you say?

He also told me to start toothpaste with fluoride (pea-sized portion), which I know Julia agrees with.

What we do need to get rid of ASAP are her gummy bear vitamins. He said he’d take ANYTHING over those. He explained that since they are so chewy, they get stuck in-between the teeth. They’re finding that when kids get their first x-rays at age 5, there can be a lot of damage in the gums from the bacteria built up. And if you start off with a lot of bacteria and cavities in your baby teeth, you are more susceptible to it with your permanent teeth.

I told him we have these toddler floss things for her, though it’s more about deciding which color she wants than any actual flossing. If she were flossing every tooth, especially those in the back, then he said she could have the gummy bears. But I know she’s not going to become good at that until she’s probably my age. Maybe they should just make the gummy vitamins for grownups??

He also isn’t a fan of juice–especially if it has ANY added sugar, as that creates a film. He said to have her drink water after every meal to rinse away bacteria. And of course make sure to brush her teeth after the evening bottle. Never let a child suck milk for long periods of time without brushing. Luckily Fia downs her bottle in about 3 minutes.

When we left, I popped into a store to buy her a t-shirt. There was a huge bin of organic lollipops. She begged. She had been so good in the dentist’s chair that I gave in. I suck.

Brushing teeth picture courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Diaper Rash War: Miracle Paste?

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

My Miracle Paste

Battle lines are drawn–with white creams. Instead of a bulletproof vest, I wear a pee-proof one. Yes, I’m in combat against Emmett’s diaper rash and I’m determined to win.  And I think I am—at least right now. But just like war, I know it can change by the minute/hour. For 3 days we’ve been holding our ground.

All your comments were super helpful. Thank you so much. Now to update  you guys.

Even though I had such angst at the last pediatrician visit, I took his advice and ordered the stomahesive powder and pure zinc oxide from the pharmacist.  I also got a tube of miconazole, which is an antifungal cream for yeast infections.  I had been using Lotrimin (athlete’s foot). The pharmacist told me to switch to the miconazole (and that may be the key to all this, not sure).

I mixed together:

1 part miconazole

4 parts pure zinc oxide

Stomahesive powder until it made a sticky paste (honestly, unless there is something special about the powder I think cornstarch would do the same).

Every diaper change I dab the area where the poop is (I don’t rub) with damp Viva paper towels. Then I put the paste on, followed by a huge dollop of Aquafor.

This is what Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles uses and they swear by it. I think I may too.

I’m using Seventh Generation Diapers so no chemicals.

We’ve been airing him out for about 40 minutes at a time, twice a day.

Here’s the other half of the equation that some of you swore by (@Amanda, @Mariane):

I have cut down quite a bit on my dairy intake. I put rice milk in my cereal and just a small amount of 2% milk in my coffee. A little cheese on my salad. That’s about it from the cow.

I don’t know what is making the difference. Maybe both the concoction and my diet??? But I am happy to report his bum looks so much better.

Consequently, our good friend who is an ER doctor (and helped counsel us on our circumcision decision) has said all along to use pure zinc oxide. People swear by Triple Paste and Desitin, but those are weaker in the zinc amount. And some of this stuff, like Desitin, has a fragrance, which the pediatrician said could make it worse.

I also don’t think Em is pooping as much—which could be attributed to my modified dairy intake. Could also be that he’s 5 weeks old today and his gut is getting more mature. As we all know, it’s such a guessing game with infants, so I’m sticking to what seems to be working.  I’ll plead with my troops to keep up the fight. We will win this war!

QUICK UPDATE: THE F-CKING RASH IS BACK. I AM GOING TO SCREAM. IT LOOKS WORSE THAN EVER. LIKE I SAID, IT CAN CHANGE IN A SECOND…. BACK TO THE DOC….AGAIN.

 

 

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Picky Eaters

Saturday, November 27th, 2010

From the beginning of her bottle life, Fia took it like a champ. So much so, that even after she turned one, I was apparently feeding her too much formula. Truth is, the bottle became my crutch. If she didn’t eat enough real food I’d get nervous that she would be hungry, so I’d give her one. It was quite enlightening when I recently took her to the pediatrician for her one-year appointment.

Here’s how the conversation with Dr. TJ Gold began:

“How’s her appetite?”

“Well, I’m still giving her about 32 ounces a day of formula. Real food is kinda hit or miss.”

A stern stare. I continue.

“She gets picky at the table and I worry that she’s not eating enough, so I fill her up however I can.”

Dr. Gold nods knowingly, as if saying, yeah, I’ve seen this before.

“And do you also run around while she plays trying to put food in her mouth?” she asks.

“YES!” I exclaim, thinking she “gets” it.  She understands how picky babies are. I continue: “I run around the exersaucer chucking cheese into her mouth. I run after her through the living room, shoving saltines in. Anything I can get her to eat and any way I can do it.“ I beam, waiting for the sign of approval.

Dr. Gold clears her throat and she says something to me that was a game changer for me.

“Terrible Two’s happen because of parenting choices made during the 1’s.”

HUH????

She continues, “And it’s much harder to reverse bad behavior than to just begin with good behavior.”

Look, I feel like I’m a fairly reasonable, somewhat smart and aware person. And I’ve read the range of babybooks—from Dr. Sears to Babywise. But in this scenario, for whatever reason, my mom instincts were off. I’m sure it stems from my primal need for sleep and my irrational fear that she’ll start waking up in the night hungry if she doesn’t get enough during the day. Whatever the cause, I’m so so so glad Dr. Gold stopped me cold in my tracks and reversed my behavior. It immediately made a difference, and continues to nearly a month later. Here is a recap of what I learned:

You feed your baby broccoli one day, the next day she flicks it off her tray and refuses to eat it. You try pasta, which you know she likes. And oops, there goes the flick again. She isn’t interested in any of the usual staples. Desperate, you scour your fridge. Yogurt and applesauce. The sweet stuff. You pull it out, try it on her, and voilà, she eats it. Guess what? You’ve just been had and your baby just won a major battle. Continue like this, and soon she’s the master. And you’re the servant, scrambling to find food she’ll eat.

“Picky eaters are formed by this exact scenario,” Dr. Gold tells me. They know if they flick food off, eventually mom will come running to their rescue with something sweet.

Then she gave me a very healthy warning. “This is also how you end up with a 2-year old who can’t sit still at a restaurant. And it’s how you start to lose your edge as a parent. “

“But, what do I do?” I say, wringing my hands. “If she won’t eat, then she’ll wake up in the night, and next thing you know, I’m dealing with a newborn schedule again!!”

Not true, says Dr. Gold. Mealtime is very specific. You put her in the highchair, TV off, time to focus and you feed her. If she flicks her food, you stop feeding. Take her down. Wait 30 minutes. Try again. She’s not going to starve. When she’s hungry enough, she’ll eat.

She also told me to switch to whole milk and cut down to 16 ounces a day max.

At the visit, Fia was in the 10th percentile for weight, 48th for height. While Dr. Gold wasn’t a bit worried, I swear Fi fattened up within 3 days following her instructions. It was a remarkable shift. And now, she literally eats everything. And lots of it. When she sees me setting her food out, she toddles up to her highchair and throws her arms in the air, begging to go in it. A far cry from me running around in circles, chasing her while shoveling bits of food in her mouth.

spoonstrike

Every baby is different, so this might not work for you, but I just thought I’d share my own experience. My new and improved routine goes like this:

7am – She wakes up. I give her a 6 oz bottle of whole milk.

8:30-9am – Breakfast. Yogurt, toast with peanut butter, banana, etc. Sippy cup with water and a splash of OJ.

11am – Lunch. Chickpeas, rice, chicken, mac and cheese….whatever I’m eating. I just cut it up in small pieces.

1-2pm – Small bottle. Snack.

5-6pm – Dinner. Again, whatever we’re going to eat.

6:30pm – Bath time.

7pm – Book and 6 oz bottle. Baby sleeps through night.

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