Posts Tagged ‘ comments ’

Would You Call Another Baby Ugly?

Monday, August 27th, 2012

I was an ugly baby. At least that’s what my Dad always told me. My mom would say, “Sam, that’s just not true.” But he’d say, “Yes it is. She was red faced and fussy.” This conversation would go on in front of me. But guess what? It was true. At least compared to my brother Kelly who had perfectly rosy cheeks, soft skin, and a sweet temperament.

Fast forward, oh, 40 years, and my slacker brother has a mullet and I’m on TV.  So there. Who went from the ugly duckling to the beautiful swan? (And yes Kelly, the mullet needs to go. As do the side stripes. The whole look is obnoxious. Snap.)

Hmmmm, which mullet is real? Oh, right, my loser brother’s one in the middle.

My Dad was never trying to be mean. He was illustrating the ugly duckling analogy.

Thing is, I didn’t grow up in the internet age, so this was just a joke within my family.  Which brings me to the point of this blog. What the f–k is up with the mean comments about Tia Mowry’s baby? The gist of it is she posted pictures of her baby, Cree, online. A bunch of people started writing in about how ugly he was. Shame on all those idiots. And yes, they are complete a-holes.

But isn’t this the conundrum of the internet age? We have amazing information at our fingertips? We get jobs online? We are able to hold Big Business and Government accountable? But we also take the power bestowed on us to hide behind our keyboards and cut others down. We get to feel important and feed our egos and that primal need “to matter”–all at the cost of cruelty.  How sad. Pathetic actually.

At what consequence is this all worth it?

I’ve written before about how we need to check out of our personal technology hell.Our addiction. We are becoming a culture of zombies who scrunch over our phones all day. We ignore our children. We ignore our friends. White and gray matter is shrinking in our brains. But it goes beyond that. A lot of the internet isn’t making us better people. It is making us worse. The Tia story is just one small example of that.

When my editor, Sherry Huang, approached me with this story, she wrote:

What if you’re a cute baby but turn out to be an “ugly” adult?  Or what if the “ugly” baby grows up to be a person with a beautiful soul?  And what does all this say about us judging people – even innocent babies – by their looks?  Babies can’t defend themselves. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder – the baby is obviously not “ugly” to his parents. Just the sheer joy of bringing one into the world should be enough.

Now I will say, I got a chuckle out of remembering a conversation my mom and I had before she died. We were wondering, if someone has an ugly baby, do they know it? Or is beauty really in the eye of the beholder? And when you meet someone who has an ugly baby do you say, “He’s so cute?” Or do you just stick to, “Congratulations.” Or, “Cute outfit”. Because let’s admit it: there are some funny looking babies out there.

But that is beside the point. I think we all need to examine what our role on the internet is. What voice do we want to put out there? What are our motivations behind it? Greed, Envy, Ego? Kindness, Compassion, Strength? Because this feeding frenzy of negativity is disturbing and disheartening.

Okay, off my soapbox and back to my brother. He is a climber. Not talking social or career. He’s a real, hard-core Alpinist. Goes around the world climbing mountains of rock and ice. He tests gear for Patagonia and blogs for them. He also has a book deal. But for whatever reason, he chooses to look like a deadbeat. Why? I’ll never know. And it doesn’t matter anyway.

He’s the old guy, second from right, creeping out the young kids in the hot tub. Note the side stripes.

P.S. For the record, I got his permission to say all this. And post his pictures. Plus, I’m not doing this anonymously.

 

Hot tub picture courtesy of NYT Magazine.

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Marissa Mayer–Your Comments on Working Through Maternity Leave

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

There were so many insightful, great comments based on my Marissa Mayer blog post, I figured I would share some of them. In most cases, these are just part of the comment, so if you feel compelled, go and read them in their entirety.

I think the general consensus is: we aren’t sure what to make of Mayer’s decision, but we wish her the best. I think there is also a consensus that she is perhaps a tad naive in her broad strokes line of “I’ll take a few weeks of maternity leave and just work through.” And lastly, I think everyone agrees that maternity leave in this country is terribly lacking.

So here are some snippets from you guys about the controversy. I really appreciate you taking the time to weigh in. Hopefully you didn’t do it while on maternity leave (instead of being with your baby. Ha).

This woman is a lawyer and said the following: I can’t speak for Ms. Mayer directly, but if she is anything like me and other women who APPEAR to be supermoms, in reality, she is in for a tough road. I so desperately wanted (and still want) to prove that a baby doesn’t make me inferior or weaker that I overwork myself into oblivion (whether working on business stuff or mommy stuff). All I’ve proven is that you can “have it all” but you won’t be truly happy on the inside, and in the end, that is what matters most.

Elisabeth: Some of us single Mom’s are driving & shopping with our babies 4 or 5 days after major surgery…a c-section. One does what one has to…and when that means needing to go to the pharmacy and tote your newborn with you, you do it!

Lisa Spence: I’m hopeful that she sets a new standard. Board meetings with a mommy’s helper and a bunch of rug rats in the next room. nursing through P&L discussions. Business meetings at the park over PB&Js, delivering TED talks with an Ergo strapped to her chest, bouncing from side to side – exactly the kind of CEO I really want to be, but there is no precedent. I do think we can have it all, but we have to completely blow the “good old boys club” out of the water.

(Amen, sister!)

Amber: What money is able to buy her is nannies etc but it can’t buy off your hormones,memory, focus and body. I think she will have many tears and regret.

B Drake: I really don’t believe that going back to work will be such a big deal for her. People in her economic group can afford help, so she’ll be able to make all of her time with her baby quality time, and not worry about most of the logistics that lower income moms must handle.

Holly: I was working from the hospital less than 24 hours after my c-section. On the way home the next day, I stopped in to work to pick up and drop of paperwork. I actually spoke to 3 of my freight reps several hours after my son my son was born. And I regret none of it. He was sleeping. I had my husband there to do everything I couldn’t. And I don’t feel that I missed “bonding time” with my son. What I do regret is trying so hard to run a company with my son at work with me. I ran a small manufacturing company, so there was no corporate daycare and the warehouse was to loud for me to just put my son in a carrier and walk around with him. I worked until he was 10 months old, and he spent a lot of time in his playpen. He fell behind developmentally, my work suffered, and I was stressed all the time because I was failing at both of my jobs (work and being a mother). Working through maternity leave is not that difficult. Working while carrying for a 6+ month old child is stupid. 

I want to end with this one, as the last line of her comment is oh-so-true. And regret is a bitch. Thanks again ladies for the insight!

Laura: When I had my second son, we were short staffed and even though I had a six week maternity leave, I ended up going in a few hours here and there. I ended up shorting myself an entire precious week with my newborn. While I believe every mother has the option to decide what works best for her, I wish I could go back and take even more time with both of my boys. Those first few precious are indescribable and so short. We’ve all heard the saying that when you die you will probably not look back on life and wish you had spent just a few more hours at work… instead you look back and think of all the times you wish you could have spent with those important to you.

 

Picture of signs via Shutterstock

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