Posts Tagged ‘ Sushi ’

Try This Pregnancy-Safe Sushi Recipe

Friday, February 28th, 2014

One of pregnant women’s major food cravings is always sushi! Even though there is evidence that having sushi during pregnancy is safer than you think—and that eating fish while pregnant actually helps lower anxiety—so many pregnant women still don’t want to risk it (no pressure, ladies!). So, in honor of Foodie Friday, here is a fish-free alternative from the creative chefs at SUSHISAMBA that will satisfy your sushi pregnancy cravings while packing in tons of potassium, fiber, magnesium, iron, B-6 (with all-important folic acids), vitamin A, and protein.

Yasai Temaki Recipe
serves 1 (but can be multiplied to make larger batches)

Ingredients:
2 pieces sweet potato tempura (approximately 1.4 oz.)
0.1 oz. sweet soy (bottled)
2 slices avocado, ripe/freshly sliced (approximately 0.7 oz.)
2 pieces pea shoot
1.2 oz. red quinoa, cooked
.5” soy paper (half cut)
tempura batter

Quinoa ingredients:
1 cup red quinoa (100% organic)
2 cups water

Method: Heat water with quinoa in a medium sized pan. Cover and keep heat on high until water is boiling, then turn heat to medium until water is absorbed. Total boiling time is roughly 15 minutes.

Temaki preparation:
Step 1: Prepare sweet potato tempura
Slice sweet potato in half lengthwise. Lightly coat in tempura batter and cook (as per instructions on tempura batter box). Then, slice the sweet potato into fries (1 fry equals 1 piece).

Step 2: Prepare avocado
Cut the avocado in half lengthwise and twist the two halves until they separate. Cut the half into quarters. Cut off the ends, remove the skin and slice lengthwise into ¼ inch slices. Set the slices aside.

Tip: You can include whatever vegetables you like—scallion, carrot, zucchini, radish —to customize your temaki to your own personal taste.

Step 3: Prepare the soy paper
Tear or cut the soy paper sheets in half. Hold a ½ sheet of soy paper with one side down in the palm of one hand.

Step 4: Press quinoa into soy paper
Moisten your other hand with a little water and ball up the 1.2 oz. of prepared quinoa. Press it into the left side of the soy paper.

Step 5: Add filling
Lay vegetable filling alongside quinoa.

Step 6: Wrap into cone
Tightly wrap the opposite right-hand edge around, using a folding and tucking method to create a cone shape with the filling on the inside.

Step 7: Secure edge
Use a dab of quinoa on the corner to secure the inside edge of the soy paper to the outside of the cone.

Step 8: Place on plate, garnish, and enjoy!

SUSHISAMBA has locations in London, Las Vegas, New York City, Chicago, Coral Gables, and Miami.

How well do you know your favorite celebrity’s pregnancy cravings? Find out here!

TELL US: What is your biggest pregnancy craving? Are you eating fish and sushi while pregnant? Why or why not?

Image courtesy of SUSHISAMBA.

 

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Sushi During Pregnancy: Safer Than You Think!

Monday, July 15th, 2013

Is sushi safe during pregnancy?Forget alcohol, what most pregnant women miss most is sushi! But now news comes that you might not have to skip the raw fish, plus eating fish while pregnant can help lower your anxiety levels.

The benefits of eating fish while pregnant far outweigh the risks. Researchers from Children of the 90s at the University of Bristol and the Federal University of Rio de Janiero, Brazil, found that women who never ate seafood had a 53 percent greater likelihood of having high levels of anxiety at 32 weeks of pregnancy when compared to women who ate seafood regularly. The results suggest that two meals of white fish and one meal of oily fish each week would be enough to ward off anxiety.

Excessive anxiety is not good for the mother’s long-term health and can result in her baby being born prematurely and having a low birth weight. Previous research from Children of the 90s has shown the beneficial effects of eating oily fish during pregnancy on a child’s IQ and eyesight. This new study shows the importance of oily fish for a mother’s mental health and the health and development of her baby.

Even though the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists still recommends not eating sushi while pregnant, there is no scientific evidence linking pregnant women eating sushi with health risks  to babies or complications with pregnancies. In fact,  Dr. Amos Grunebaum, Director of Obstetrics and Chief of Labor & Delivery at Cornell Medical center says it’s totally fine. And in Japan (where they should know a thing or two about sushi), eating raw fish is considered part of good neonatal nutrition as long as the fish isn’t high in mercury levels (salmon is a safe pick!).

The main worry about pregnant women eating sushi seems to come from the fear of parasites. However, farmed salmon (which is most likely to be used in sushi as opposed to wild salmon) is rarely susceptible to parasites, and fish is almost always flash frozen to transport, which kills the parasites anyway (and if you’re eating cooked fish, the high temperatures will also kill the parasites).

According to the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine, most seafood-related illnesses are due to shellfish—not fish. The risk of falling ill from seafood other than shellfish is 1 in 2 million compared to 1 in 25,000 from chicken.

It’s still advised to speak to your doctor about your pregnancy diet, but the widespread panic about pregnant women eating sushi seems completely overblown—and eating it could actually help your baby’s brain development. Couldn’t you go for a little mahi mahi right about now?

TELL US: Have you given up sushi while pregnant? Will this new research make you change your mind? 

Image of sushi courtesy of Shutterstock.

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