Posts Tagged ‘ pregnancy ’

What One Mom Said to Insult ALL Pregnant Women

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Oh no, she didn’t! Yes, she did! Australian blogger Loni Jane Anthony, who made news for going on an extreme diet that consisted almost exclusively of fruit, has opened her big mouth again, and this time she’s managed to insult pregnant women everywhere! After she displayed what many critics considered to be an eating disorder while pregnant, often called pregorexia, she gave birth to a healthy baby boy, weighing in at 8 pounds, 7 ounces (thank God!). So, of course, outspoken Loni is now saying she is “living proof you don’t have to become a whale while you’re pregnant.” Exqueeze me!

I think I speak for any woman who has ever been pregnant when I say, “How dare you?” When you’re pregnant you are no longer in control of the shape of your body. Yes, it’s smart to watch what you eat when you’re pregnant, and too much overindulgence in those out-of-control pregnancy cravings can be bad news (leading to bigger, heavier babies, which equals a harder labor for you, and possible obesity in your kid’s future). But enough of the fat shaming! It’s bad enough when it comes from the media. I don’t think women should be doing it to each other!

I also don’t think most women want to hear the criticism from Loni, whose radical fruit diet sounds a little nuts. She admitted to eating mostly bananas (up to 20 a day!), drinking fruit smoothies and occasionally pairing it with a salad for dinner. Mom to new son Rowdy, Loni says, “You don’t have to put on heaps of weight and never bounce back—you can stay really healthy.” She gained about 37 pounds while pregnant, and says she lost 22 pounds within days of giving birth. Loni says her son is the picture of health—”feeding like a machine,” “sleeping,” and “happy.” She also says she’s making plenty of breast milk, so that her diet is completely fine.

While I completely believe you can be a healthy vegetarian or vegan with a bun in the oven, I still wouldn’t advise any other mom-to-be to follow Loni’s lead with her extreme dieting. The Mayo Clinic says the diet of a pregnant woman should consist of nutrients like folic acid, calcium, vitamin D, protein, and iron, which can be obtained through the consumption of foods such as spinach, beans, milk, yogurt, salmon, eggs, lentils, and poultry. It is suggested that pregnant women have a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein.

Since Loni’s diet is short in protein—which helps with growth and repair of tissues—and several essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, calcium, and zinc, it can lead to the baby taking calcium from her bones and leaving Loni susceptible to osteoporosis later in life.

According to the New York Daily News, Loni says, “I’m consuming more good fats because I’m breastfeeding, but other than that, I’m eating the same.” And she plans to raise son Rowdy with the same diet. “I’m thriving on a plant-based diet, so why wouldn’t (my baby)? If I believe that the way I eat is the best way possible, then why would I let him eat any other way?”

TELL US: Do you think Loni’s diet is healthy for her and her son?

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Image of Loni Jane Anthony and son Rowdy via Instagram.

Exercise With Baby: Quads, Hamstrings and Butt
Exercise With Baby: Quads, Hamstrings and Butt
Exercise With Baby: Quads, Hamstrings and Butt

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Obese Dads Could Raise Baby’s Autism Risk

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

While a mom’s weight before and during pregnancy is often a hot topic (we worry about eating enough of the right things and as few of the bad things as possible), we often forget that it takes two (at least) to make a baby. So how much does the dad’s health and DNA contribute to your baby bundle? Researchers at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health found that obese fathers up the risk of autism in their children more so than obese moms. That’s right—the dad-to-be’s weight seems to be more of a contributing factor than the mom-to-be’s!

They studied nearly 93,000 Norwegian children at three, five and seven. The mothers answered detailed questions about their own—and their children’s—mental and physical health, while the dads completed a questionnaire about their mental and physical health while their partners were pregnant. The researchers also collected data from the Norwegian Patient Registry and from studies of children who were referred for evaluation and treatment of possible autism or Asperger’s syndrome.

The researchers adjusted for variables that may also be associated with the development of autism in the child. In addition to adjusting for maternal obesity, they considered education, age, smoking, mental disorders, hormone therapy before pregnancy, use of folic acid, maternal diabetes, preeclampsia and the baby’s weight at birth. The researchers found that the risk remained unchanged when adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors.

The findings say that maternal obesity has little association with the development of autism in the child. However, they found a doubled risk for development of autism and Asperger’s syndrome in the child if the father was obese, compared with a normal weight father. (But note, the odds are small: just under 0.3 percent of kids with obese dads were diagnosed with autism, versus 0.14 percent of kids with fathers at healthy weights.)

Doctors still don’t know why a father’s obesity could cause a higher rate of autism in his kids. There could be an indirect association with certain gene variations, or obese men might be more likely to have certain environmental exposures that contribute to autism. But there also might be a direct tie, like the extra weight might actually alter sperm quality, leading to malformations that would cause autism. More research needs to be done on the subject to find a definite cause and effect, but all signs point to the fact that both mom and dad’s health contribute to whether you’ll have a healthy baby. So if you’re trying to get pregnant, set a standing date for a couple’s workout!

TELL US: Are you surprised to hear that a dad’s weight could raise his baby’s autism risk?

How much do you know about toddler nutrition? Put your IQ to the test.

Early Signs of Autism
Early Signs of Autism
Early Signs of Autism

Image of man’s belly courtesy of Shutterstock.

 

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Baby on the Way for Johnny Depp and Amber Heard?

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

First comes love, then comes marriage (well, an engagement anyway!), then comes Johnny Depp and Amber Heard with a baby carriage? According to reports, Johnny and fiancé Amber are expecting their first child together (his third—he has two children with ex-girlfriend Vanessa Paradis: Lily-Rose, 14 and Jack, 11).

In Touch was the first to report the couples’ baby-on-the-way news after Amber’s ex-boyfriend, Mark Wystrach, shared the news. “She’s pregnant already! I saw her three weeks ago,” he revealed. “Amber and I dated years ago but we are still close.”

Amber and Johnny—who is wearing his own diamond engagement ring similar to Amber’s—first met while filming 2011’s The Rum Diary, and became an official item after Johnny and Vanessa split in 2012. While promoting his latest movie, Transcendence, Johnny told Entertainment Tonight that he’s all for having more kids with Amber.

Though Johnny said that the wedding will not be “a shotgun affair,” he admits that he can’t wait to have children with Amber. “I love kids. I have two, and they’re perfect,” he gushed. “Man, I’d make 100. But I’ve got the easy gig, right?”

Ah, a man who realizes we women do all the heavy lifting (um, labor is called that for a reason!)—that makes Johnny even more of a keeper, Amber!

TELL US: Were you or will you be married before you have a baby?

Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?
Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?
Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?

 

Image of Johnny Depp and Amber Heard courtesy of Helga Esteb/Shutterstock

 

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Take THIS to Reduce Your Risk of Preeclampsia

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

If you’re like I was when I was pregnant, I was reading everything about pregnancy that I could get my hands on. It was great to be informed, but at times I thought I’d drive myself crazy trying to self-diagnose what I was feeling after reading all of the various ways pregnancies can be complicated (for the record I developed gestational diabetes but otherwise had a healthy pregnancy, and a very healthy son).

One of the big baddies is preeclampsia, a condition usually occurring after 20 weeks of pregnancy and characterized by high blood pressure, protein in the urine, liver disease and blood-clotting abnormalities. Nearly seven million pregnant women suffer from it a year (including stars like Angelina Jolie, Faith Hill and Jennifer Lopez and rumor has it Kim Kardashian and Britney Spears had it too), and it’s the leading cause of death in pregnant women.

When a pregnant woman develops preeclampsia in the second trimester, her infant often must be delivered prematurely to avoid severe maternal complications, like stroke (similar to the eclampsia death on Downtown Abbey).

But there’s a silver lining to this Debbie Downer of a disease. To prevent the dangerous disorder, The U.S. Preventative Service Task Force is recommending 81 milligrams of low-dose aspirin daily—after 12 weeks of gestation—for pregnant women at high risk. Women are considered high risk if they’ve had preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, are expecting multiples, or if they have a history of diabetes, hypertension or kidney disease.

This recommendation follows other medical organizations like the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Heart Association , which have also advised that high-risk women use low-dose aspirin.

However, the task force also recommends that expectant women with multiple moderate-risk factors may also benefit from low-dose aspirin. These risks include obesity, a family history of preeclampsia, women older than 35, and African-American women.

Research shows that “low-dose aspirin every day lowers the risk of preeclampsia by 24 percent,” says Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, the co-vice chair of USPSTF. “And it lowers the risk of pre-term birth by 14 percent.”

As always, consult your doctor before taking any medicine—including over-the-counter drugs—while pregnant.

TELL US: Have you ever developed preeclampsia while pregnant? Share your story.

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Swelling During Pregnancy: When to Worry
Swelling During Pregnancy: When to Worry
Swelling During Pregnancy: When to Worry

Image of pregnant woman courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Is Rihanna Pregnant? Baby Bump Spotted!

Monday, April 7th, 2014

The internet is buzzing that the usually flat-stomached RiRi is sporting what appears to be a small baby bump in photos shot on April 4. While the hip-hop star is taking a break from touring, she seems to have suddenly changed her partying ways—which has people wondering, Is she really pregnant? And if so, whose baby is it?

Most likely Drake, who she may have been secretly dating for some time, although they didn’t publicly reunite till February? They’ve even reportedly spoken about moving in together. So could baby make three? Or could the dad be Drake’s arch nemesis, Chris Brown, who Rihanna seems to have an eternal flame for?

I don’t really care who the baby’s daddy is! If the news is true, I’m just glad that Rihanna is getting healthy for the baby. MediaTakeOut.com claims that Rihanna no longer smokes cigarettes or weed, has turned down alcohol on several occasions at events (where she normally wouldn’t), and that she even order decaffeinated tea during a recent Starbucks run with her dad.

I certainly know how it feels to have those mama bear instincts kick in. Suddenly you have this amazing little being inside you and you want to make sure you’re making his or her home as safe as possible. I wanted to eat right (minus those pesky donut cravings!), get some exercise in (when I wasn’t completely exhausted!), and rest as much as possible (even though I had a really hard time changing from sleeping on my back to my side), trying not to let things that would normally stress me out get to me, because I didn’t want my son still in the womb to feel anxious like I did. I also remember being hyper-aware of anyone smoking remotely around me—even outside on the city street, which I really had no control over. I’d practically sprint, so I wouldn’t be downwind of a cigarette. When you’re pregnant, it ceases to be about you. It’s all about the baby (as it should be!).

TELL US: What health changes did you make when you found out you were pregnant? Which things were the hardest to give up?

 

Coffee & Tea During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?
Coffee & Tea During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?
Coffee & Tea During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?

Image of Rihanna courtesy of Landmark Media/Shutterstock.

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