Posts Tagged ‘ Miscarriage ’

Miscarriage Misconceptions Are Common—and Painful

Monday, May 11th, 2015

Many people know that miscarriage is at least a possibility, especially early in pregnancy—that’s one reason why folks often wait until the end of their first trimester to announce they’re expecting.

But there are lots of misconceptions about miscarriages, too. And new research shows just how common those misconceptions are—and how they can actually make the experience even more traumatic for people who go through it.

According to the new study, published in the June print issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology, more than half of the respondents erroneously thought miscarriage is a rare event. More than half said they thought that less than six percent of all pregnancies end in miscarriage. (Men were more than twice as likely to consider the event rare.)

The study included 1,000 adults, about half women and half men. Of those, about 15 percent reported that they or their partner had miscarried at least one time.

Many of those people, too, thought miscarriages could result from reasons that don’t actually correspond in any way to the loss of a fetus. For instance, more than three quarters said they thought stress could cause miscarriage, and two thirds thought lifting heavy objects could cause the loss. (In reality, neither can.)

Interestingly too, nearly half of the women who have suffered a miscarriage, it turns out, have felt guilt and isolation about the experience, according to the research. Of the group, 41 percent said they felt they did something wrong that led to the miscarriage, and about a third said they felt they could have prevented what happened.

Related: Preventing Miscarriage: Is There Anything You Can Do?

So it seems that all these misconceptions may be leading to some of the powerful bad feelings following miscarriage.

“A striking finding from the study is the discrepancy between what medicine and science teach us about miscarriage and what people believe,” wrote the study’s co-author Dr. Zev Williams, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York. “Miscarriage seems to be unique in medicine in being very common yet rarely discussed, so that you have many women and couples feeling very isolated and alone.”

But the survey also pointed to things that can help cope with loss. First, knowledge and education, as well as communication and honesty, help a lot with coping. And second, just having a better understanding of why miscarriage happens can really help.

“Finding a cause for a miscarriage, even if there was nothing that could have been done to prevent it, was found to be highly desirable by the respondents,” Williams wrote. “Combining empathy with the rigor of scientific exploration could help lessen both the stigma and the incidence of miscarriage.”

Related: Miscarriage Quotes: 12 Celebrities Speak Out About Pregnancy Loss

I think this is true not only for miscarriage, but for so many other concerns related to pre-conception, pregnancy, and the postpartum phase. I believe the more that we talk about our personal experiences, and the more we share truths with each other, the more comfortable we can all be through this wild journey. So that’s what I try to do here on this blog whenever I can. Won’t you join me in speaking honestly among your circle, too?

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Alesandra Dubin is a new twin mom. She’s also a Los Angeles-based writer and the founder of lifestyle blog Homebody in Motion. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Google+ and Twitter.

Photo: Shutterstock.com

What Causes Miscarriage
What Causes Miscarriage
What Causes Miscarriage

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What Does Your Body Clock Have to Do With Miscarriage?

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Body clock pregnancyA new study offers some surprising new ideas on how body clock genes could affect our fertility and proneness to miscarriage.

The research, which comes out of Warwick Medical School and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust and was published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, shows the way in which those genes turn off for a period of time to allow an embryo to implant in the uterus, a key piece of the timing puzzle for conception.

Looking at endometrial cells from the linings of both healthy women as well as those who had experienced miscarriage multiple times, the researchers found that women who experienced those losses might be less capable of regulating the clock genes in their uterine lining.

The study also offers insights about how fertility may be affected in women with atypical work hours—like night shifts.

Most importantly, of course, the researchers hope that identifying this cause of multiple miscarriages might be able to help more people conceive—huge news for anxious couples who are TTC. And it could have significant implications related to IVF, if doctors were able to use knowledge about bio-rhythms to have more success with implanting embryos.

Professor Siobhan Quenby, a consultant obstetrician at Warwick Medical School and UHCW NHS Trust said in a statement, “We hope that [the study] will increase worldwide knowledge about possible reasons for infertility and recurrent miscarriages, so that we are able to help families achieve their dream of having children.”

Related: Miscarriage: Causes, Signs & What to Expect

Sign up for our pregnancy newsletters to keep up with the latest pregnancy news.

Alesandra Dubin is a new twin mom. She’s also a Los Angeles-based writer and the founder of home and travel blog Homebody in Motion. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Google+ and Twitter.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

What Causes Miscarriage
What Causes Miscarriage
What Causes Miscarriage

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Jaime King Opens Up: Miscarriage, IVF—and Then Natural Conception

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

Jaime King infertilityWe’ve long known about Jaime King’s infertility struggle—she revealed last year that she tried for close to five years before conceiving her son, James. But now she’s opening up even more: about miscarriage, IVF, and other painful details.

The 35-year-old actress speaks openly about the traumatic process in this week’s People magazine, revealing that she had five miscarriages, endured five rounds of IVF, and 26 rounds of IUI. She says that a diagnosis of endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome were behind her difficulties.

After all of that, she ended up conceiving her baby naturally—and of course, was thrilled and beyond grateful for her pregnancy.

So with a healthy and happy 1-year-old baby in her life, and that suffering behind her, why is she talking about her miscarriage experience now? Because she says she wants to open up lines of dialogue about a topic that can be stubbornly closed for suffering hopeful moms-to-be out there. “I was hiding what I was going through for so long, and I hear about so many women going through what I went through,” she told the magazine. “If I’m open about it, hopefully it won’t be so taboo to talk about it.”

Sign up for our pregnancy newsletters and keep up with the latest pregnancy news.

Alesandra Dubin is a new twin mom. She’s also a Los Angeles-based writer and the founder of home and travel blog Homebody in Motion. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Google+ and Twitter.

Photo courtesy of Debby Wong/Shutterstock.com

What to Expect After Miscarriage
What to Expect After Miscarriage
What to Expect After Miscarriage

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Bill and Giuliana Rancic’s Surrogate Suffers a Miscarriage

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Bill and Giuliana Rancic
Bill and Giuliana Rancic have been open about building their family via surrogacy—the E! Stars are parents to 21-month-old son Duke, who was born via surrogate in 2012—and now People reports some sad news: The couple’s surrogate, Delphine, recently suffered a miscarriage.

“She was about nine weeks pregnant. We were pretty close to getting into the safe zone,” Rancic told the magazine, adding, “We experienced a miscarriage years ago when we were trying with Giuliana, so we had been keeping the pregnancy news tight to the vest.”

Not surprising, Bill says he and Giuliana “were devastated.”

But the couple, whose reality TV show, Giuliana and Bill, has prominently featured their desire to add to their family this season, aren’t giving up.

“We’re fighters. Hopefully we’re going to have good news and Delphine will be on board one more time,” he said. “We’ve had to battle it out and that’s something that we’re going to continue to do.”

We wish them all the best…

Image of Bill and Giuliana Rancic courtesy of Shuttershock

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Meet the Duggars of England: The Radfords!

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

While America has the Duggars, who have 19 children and are contemplating having their twentieth, England has the Radfords—the largest family in Britain. Matriarch Sue Radford, 39, is pregnant with her 17th baby (due in November), who will join her nine sons and seven daughters ranging in age from 25 to 1.

To add to the family’s excitement, Sue and husband Noel’s 20-year-old daughter, Sophie, is also pregnant and will be having her second child just five weeks earlier than her mom! Sue says going through the pregnancies together has kept her mind off worrying about her own baby. Sadly, Sue had a miscarriage in September (similar to her U.S. counterpart Michelle Duggar). Sue says she and Noel were “devastated beyond words” when a 12-week scan revealed they had lost their baby.

“After everything we went through when we had a miscarriage, Sophie really helps to keep me calm, Sue told The Daily Mail. “I worried constantly during my last pregnancy but instead of doing the same this time, I just keep saying that what will be, will be. Because we are going through the same thing, we are able to talk about everything and reassure each other. It is great not to have to go through it all on your own.”

The two moms-to-be aren’t only sharing their feelings with each other, but their food cravings too. “We are craving all of the same things, particularly junk food,” shares Sue. “We just laugh and say at least we will get fat together.”

Sophie knows she is having a girl, but Sue hasn’t found out the sex of her baby yet, but has a gut feeling it will be another boy. Will they stop there, or keep adding to their brood like their American equivalent across the Pond, the Duggars? “I always say ‘never say never,’ but maybe this time it is the last,” says Sue.

Wondering if you’re having a boy or a girl? Check our ancient Chinese birth chart for fun!

Stress During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?
Stress During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?
Stress During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?

Image courtesy of the Radfords.

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