Posts Tagged ‘ fertility ’

The Real Reason Women Should Be Wary of Egg-Freezing Job Perks

Monday, October 27th, 2014

When Apple and Facebook announced recently that they would pay for their employees to freeze their eggs should they choose the procedure — to the tune of $20,000 — the news was met with plenty of conflict.

Some heralded the move as a positive step for women in the workplace, who’d now be able to have more control over their fertility, especially as it related to their professional trajectories. Others, however, called it just a way to manipulate women into working insane hours indefinitely, with no work-life balance in the cards. Ever.

But diverse philosophies on the matter aside, there’s another issue women considering their eggs should consider,  one that often gets lost in discussions like this — and that’s whether or not it actually works. A Wired piece points to what may be some pretty dismal math for women interested in pursuing this route.

The article points to the fact that neither the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists nor the American Society for Reproductive Medicine endorse the practice of egg freezing to put off childbearing. And more staggeringly, it calls out data showing that 77 percent of egg implantations for 30-year-old women fail. And for 40-year-old women, that figure soars to a bleak 91 percent.

If those stats are to be believed, egg freezing’s long-shot effectiveness ought to play a much bigger role in women’s decision-making than a buzzy new employer benefit.

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Trying to Conceive: 5 Common Fertility Mistakes
Trying to Conceive: 5 Common Fertility Mistakes
Trying to Conceive: 5 Common Fertility Mistakes

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

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The Easiest Way to Tell When You’re Fertile: Your Spit!

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

If you’ve tried to chart your fertility, or pee on sticks looking for smiley faces, you know it can be a frustrating task. It’s hard to feel you really know when your body is ready to make a baby. Or at least, that’s typically been the case.

There’s a new product out now that claims it can help TTC women clearly understand their ovulation cycles — even seeing unequivocal answers for ourselves. The FDA-approved product is called Knowhen Saliva Fertility Monitor, and it uses your spit and a five-minute daily routine to give answers.

Here’s how it works: When you wake up in the morning, your saliva contains salts, which contain the info about where you are in your cycle when viewed under a microscope. So you place a dab of spit on the product’s lens in the morning, let it dry, and look through the mini microscope. You’ll see either dots, dots and fernlike patterns, or the fernlike patterns with no dots. That last one is the one that indicates ovulation, so you’ll know you’re at your peak time to conceive if you see it.

Science is neat!

Tell us: Would you try this new product?

Going for a baby? Use our TTC tools to help you get there. Plus, don’t forget to like Everything Pregnancy to keep up with the very latest in pregnancy news.

Trying to Conceive: Your Ovulation Calendar
Trying to Conceive: Your Ovulation Calendar
Trying to Conceive: Your Ovulation Calendar

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

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TTC? The Surprising Habit That Could Hurt Your Fertility

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Trying to conceive can be a stressful time. Maybe it leads to sleepless nights, and maybe that insomnia leads to late-night TV benders, or endless scrolling through a phone or tablet for Internet guidance. Does that sound like you? If so, you might have developed a coping habit that’s actually detrimental to your chances of making a baby.

According to a new report, women who are trying to become pregnant, and those who are already expecting, should avoid staying up late, or other exposure to light during the nighttime hours. The study, published in Fertility and Sterility and cited by LiveScience, suggests that sleeping in a completely dark room—that means no light from inside or outside, and no screens—is the most conducive environment for reproductive health, and for protection of a fetus in utero.

“If women are trying to get pregnant, maintain at least eight hours of a dark period at night,” said cellular biology professor Russel J. Reiter of the University of Texas Health Science Center in the study. “The light-dark cycle should be regular from one day to the next; otherwise, a woman’s biological clock is confused.”

Primarily, this is because turning on the light signals the body to turn down the production of melatonin, which is useful in protecting eggs, as well as maintaining healthy cycles for incubating babies. The researcher points out that evolutionarily speaking, humans’ sleep schedules were determined by the rising and setting of the sun, with the natural light-dark cycles regulating our circadian rhythms–and in short, modern conveniences can kinda mess us all up.

Shop for ovulation kits

So what can you do? If you wish, consider springing for a set of blackout shades. And if possible, avoid turning on the lights at night, even if you’re struggling to sleep. You might even find you can soothe yourself back to sleep more easily this way—and that’s the best thing for you for all sorts of reasons!

TTC? Talk to other women trying to get pregnant. And don’t forget to like Everything Pregnancy on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in pregnancy news and trends!

Trying to Conceive: 5 Ways to Get Pregnant Faster
Trying to Conceive: 5 Ways to Get Pregnant Faster
Trying to Conceive: 5 Ways to Get Pregnant Faster

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

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Dealing With Infertility? Read THIS for Inspiration!

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

As women, we often think, “Of course, I’ll be able to get pregnant” no matter what our age. But, unfortunately, that’s not always the case. And though it may become harder to get pregnant as you age, you can still have infertility issues in your twenties or thirties—not just your forties. That said, here’s a happy story about good things coming to those who wait.

Hart of Dixie star Jaime King, 35, recently revealed to ABC News that she tried to get pregnant for four years before finally conceiving her son, James Knight, with husband Kyle Newman. Though she didn’t reveal what the key was to finally getting pregnant (a reproductive surgery? IVF or another fertility treatment? I guess you have to keep some things private), she shows that it is possible to become a mom, even when you’re not a Fertile Myrtle.

“This baby was a long time in the making,” she said about James, who is now 7 months old. “And I feel like the universe put a little extra magic dust in him. He’s like the happiest, most joyful, social, and loving child.” Aww!

“Everything takes on a new meaning,” she added about becoming a mom—something she’s always dreamed of. And though she’s a naturally skinny model-turned-actress, Jaime embraced her curves, and even shared a beautiful bikini bumpie of herself.

“There’s definitely an identity crisis you go through [when your body starts changing], but it took a long time to get pregnant,” she said, acknowledging her infertility struggle. “For me, the baby was such a blessing that the most important thing for me was that I was active…I was never obsessive about dieting or exercise. I didn’t care how much I gained. I just wanted to make sure he was healthy.”

Are you trying to conceive? Talk to other women in our community who are, too!

TELL US: How long did it take you to get pregnant?

Infertility Talk
Infertility Talk
Infertility Talk

Photo of Jaime King and James Knight Newman via Instagram.

 

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How Fertility-Friendly Is Your State? Find Out!

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Though infertility is often kept hush-hush, it’s more prevalent than you might think: It turns out that one in eight couples has trouble getting pregnant.

If you’re struggling with infertility, one of the first things you probably think is: What am I doing wrong? (We always blame ourselves, don’t we?) But surprisingly, where you live might play a role in how successful your attempts to conceive may be. RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association, recently released its second annual Fertility Scorecard, which sheds light on the discrepancies between access to fertility treatments and support by state.

The report found that the most “fertility-friendly” states to live in are Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New Jersey. The reason? According to RESOLVE, they have better insurance coverage of in vitro fertilization, a higher number of fertility specialists relative to the state’s infertile population, more infertility support groups, and less of a history of trying to pass laws that negatively impact infertile couples. Therefore, they all received an “A” grade.

Meanwhile, Alaska, New Hampshire and Wyoming are pretty much the exact opposite—with little insurance cover for IVF, few infertility specialists and support groups, and more laws that hurt infertile couples in the long run, which is why they earned an “F” grade. The majority of northern states scored a B or C, while most southern states were more likely to earn a C or D. (For a closer look at your state’s rating, click here.)

With this being National Infertility Awareness Week, RESOLVE is hoping their findings will “bring attention” to these state-by-state discrepancies. And wouldn’t it be nice if every state eventually earned an “A”? I think we all know someone who has struggled to get pregnant, and they definitely need plenty of support—both emotional and financial—while going through expensive and trying rounds of IUI (intrauterine insemination) and IVF.

Trying to conceive? Talk to other women who are, too!

TELL US: What grade did your state get on RESOLVE’s scorecard?

Trying to Conceive: 5 Ways to Get Pregnant Faster
Trying to Conceive: 5 Ways to Get Pregnant Faster
Trying to Conceive: 5 Ways to Get Pregnant Faster

Image courtesy of RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association

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