Archive for the ‘ Pregnancy News ’ Category

Will Smith Helps Fan’s Pregnancy Announcement Go Viral

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Gone are the days of simple pregnancy announcements, where you tell your friends one by one that you’ve got a bun in the oven. These days, the bigger the hoopla, the better. (Professional photo shoots! Adorable YouTube videos!) Well, preggos, now the bar has been set even higher—because it doesn’t get any bigger than having mega moviestar Will Smith as your baby news-breaking wingman.

I’ve always liked Will Smith, but this makes the actor even cooler in my eyes. Apparently, a fan named Emily recognized Will at a coffee shop and asked the A-lister if he’d help her break her baby news to her family and friends via an Instagram photo. Clearly, he said yes! Just take a look at the photo of the Men in Black star holding up a hand-written sign that says: “Emily’s Pregnant!” with Emily standing next to him, giving a thumb’s up. He looks almost as excited as the mom-to-be does! How cute is that?

While Emily’s last name is still unknown, she has her friend to thank for making her and her bump internet celebrities. The pal, whose screen name is “yogaposer” posted Emily’s birth announcement on Reddit with the caption: “My friend’s baby announcement is pretty fresh.” Come on, how do you top that? I mean, really?!

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Your Pregnancy: 5 Early Pregnancy Symptoms Most Women Deal With
Your Pregnancy: 5 Early Pregnancy Symptoms Most Women Deal With
Your Pregnancy: 5 Early Pregnancy Symptoms Most Women Deal With

Image of Emily and Will Smith via Instagram.

 

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What Do Pregnant Women Worry About?

Monday, May 19th, 2014

I know what you’re thinking, “That’s a loaded question!” What don’t pregnant women worry about? We’re concerned about what we should and shouldn’t be eating; how to get sleep when we’re not used to sleeping on our side; how to afford maternity leave; what the heck is going on with our ever-changing bodies; fill in the blank!

What’s interesting is we now have a sneak peek into what pregnant women around the world are Googling, thanks to researcher Seth Stephens-Davidowitz—who has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard—and his recent piece in the New York Times. He studied anonymous, aggregate Google search data from 20 countries to get inside the heads of pregnant women to see what they are truly worrying about.

As it turns out, the top safety-related questions in the U.S. are: Can pregnant women “eat shrimp,” “drink wine,” “drink coffee” and “take Tylenol”? In Canada, their biggest concern is whether or not they can eat dairy products, especially cream cheese (pregnant women are at a higher risk of getting listeria from unpasteurized cheeses). In Nigeria, the top question is whether pregnant women can drink cold water (in some countries it is thought to give your baby pneumonia). Meanwhile, in Mexico, the fifth most common question is: Can pregnant women wear heels? And they rarely ask about whether pregnant women can eat shrimp or drink wine.

How-tos are another area where there are huge differences of concern by country. In the United States, Australia, and Canada, the top search is “how to prevent stretch marks during pregnancy?” But in Ghana, India, and Nigeria, preventing stretch marks is not in the top five. Instead, they are more likely to search “how to have sex” or “how to sleep” while pregnant. Surprisingly, in India, one of the top searches beginning with “my husband wants,” and/or “how to” and “my husband” is “how to breastfeed my husband.” Luckily, that’s not a big trend in the United States!

The place where most pregnant women seem to be on the same page is when it comes to their pregnancy symptoms—and what’s worrying them. Searches like “nausea,” “back pain” and “constipation” in conjunction with “pregnant” seem to come up consistently in the U.S., Britain, Australia, and India. I always say that pregnancy is the great equalizer. No matter where you’re from, how much money you have, or even how famous you are, for better or worse pregnancy symptoms are the same no matter what. We’re all in this together, ladies!

Is your pregnancy weight gain on track? Find out!

TELL US: What pregnancy concerns have you Googled?

Coffee & Tea During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?
Coffee & Tea During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?
Coffee & Tea During Pregnancy: Safe or Not?

Image of pregnant woman on a computer courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Dealing With Infertility? Read THIS for Inspiration!

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

As women, we often think, “Of course, I’ll be able to get pregnant” no matter what our age. But, unfortunately, that’s not always the case. And though it may become harder to get pregnant as you age, you can still have infertility issues in your twenties or thirties—not just your forties. That said, here’s a happy story about good things coming to those who wait.

Hart of Dixie star Jaime King, 35, recently revealed to ABC News that she tried to get pregnant for four years before finally conceiving her son, James Knight, with husband Kyle Newman. Though she didn’t reveal what the key was to finally getting pregnant (a reproductive surgery? IVF or another fertility treatment? I guess you have to keep some things private), she shows that it is possible to become a mom, even when you’re not a Fertile Myrtle.

“This baby was a long time in the making,” she said about James, who is now 7 months old. “And I feel like the universe put a little extra magic dust in him. He’s like the happiest, most joyful, social, and loving child.” Aww!

“Everything takes on a new meaning,” she added about becoming a mom—something she’s always dreamed of. And though she’s a naturally skinny model-turned-actress, Jaime embraced her curves, and even shared a beautiful bikini bumpie of herself.

“There’s definitely an identity crisis you go through [when your body starts changing], but it took a long time to get pregnant,” she said, acknowledging her infertility struggle. “For me, the baby was such a blessing that the most important thing for me was that I was active…I was never obsessive about dieting or exercise. I didn’t care how much I gained. I just wanted to make sure he was healthy.”

Are you trying to conceive? Talk to other women in our community who are, too!

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Infertility Talk
Infertility Talk
Infertility Talk

Photo of Jaime King and James Knight Newman via Instagram.

 

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Another Risky Pregnancy Behavior: Driving!

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

Driving with a baby bump may lead to a bumpy ride! You know that “pregnancy brain” everyone keeps talking about? It could be affecting your driving too. According to a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, women have more car crashes when they are pregnant than any other times in their lives. “It amounts to about a 1 in 50 statistical risk of the average woman having a motor vehicle crash at some point during her pregnancy,” said Dr. Donald Redelmeier, a researcher with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto.

When you think about it, it shouldn’t be so surprising, as Dr. Redelmeier explains: “A normal pregnancy is associated with fatigue, nausea, insomnia, anxiety, and distraction. All those changes could contribute to driver error.”

What is shocking, however, is that during the second trimester, a woman’s odds of being behind the wheel in a multi-car accident—one that was bad enough to send her to the emergency room—were 42 percent greater than they were in the three years before she became pregnant. But in a woman’s third trimester, when her belly is at her biggest, she presumably drove more cautiously, because the risk of a crash was significantly lower than even before she was pregnant.

So why the increase in crashes during the second trimester? The thought is that women in the first trimester, when they could be at their queasiest, either have someone else drive or that they are super-cautious because they know they don’t feel their best, and the idea of being a mom is brand new, so they are on their best behavior in all facets of their lives. And in their third trimester, their super-sized bellies are a constant reminder that they have a baby onboard who needs protecting. But in the second trimester, when most women are feeling like their old selves—after the morning sickness subsides for most—they are more likely to let their guards down and let their minds drift.

The conclusions were formed by looking at records for more than 500,000 women who gave birth in Ontario. The women were tracked for four years before and one year after the births. The researchers counted each car crash that was serious enough for a woman to show up in an emergency room.

Before pregnancy, the number of serious crashes for all the women, as drivers, was 177 per month, an annual rate of 4.5 per 1,000. That stayed steady in the first month of pregnancy. By the fourth month, the same women were having 299 serious crashes a month, or an annual rate of 7.6 per 1,000. The rate fell sharply by the last month of pregnancy, to 2.7 per 1,000—and stayed low the year after the births.

Researchers point out that this doesn’t mean women shouldn’t be driving while pregnant, they just need to pay extra-attention to the road. According to USA Today, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists urges pregnant women to always buckle up with a lap and shoulder belt, keep air bags turned on, and keep 10 inches between the steering wheel and their breastbones. And pregnant passengers should move front seats back as far as possible or sit in back seats, says the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

No matter which trimester you’re in, just keep reminding yourself that you’re carrying precious cargo!

TELL US: Have you or someone you know gotten into a car accident while pregnant?

What’s your ideal pregnancy weight? Take our quiz for your personalized answer.

Traveling Pregnant
Traveling Pregnant
Traveling Pregnant

Image of pregnant woman driving courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Why Some Couples are Rushing to Get Pregnant NOW

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Most people follow astrology for fun. I admit it—the horoscope page is one of the first I read in a magazine. But many Chinese people are notoriously superstitious when it comes to the Chinese zodiac. So much so that in China some couples are rushing to get pregnant now—in the Year of the Horse, one thought to be a good luck charm—so their babies won’t be born in 2015, the Year of the Sheep, the Washington Post reports.

In Chinese astrology, those who are Sheep are thought to be passive, natural born followers rather than strong, outspoken leaders. And the bad luck doesn’t stop there: Supposedly they’re unlucky in business as well as relationships, with popular folklore saying that only one out of 10 people born in the Year of the Sheep finds happiness, the Post reports.

Because couples trying to conceive are getting impatient, and they don’t want to risk having a “doomed baby,” fertility specialists say they have seen a huge increase in business in recent months. According to the Chinese lunar calendar, the Year of the Sheep begins February 19, 2015, so the window for conception closes around the end of this month.

Couples are so worried that their babies will be born unlucky, that they are even asking about early delivery via C-Section to guarantee their children are born in the Year of the Horse—whether they’re ready to come out or not!

While I can’t imagine planning my pregnancy around my future child’s horoscope, if you truly believe in the Chinese zodiac, why would you want your child to be destined to a lifetime of unhappiness?! As moms and moms-to-be, we want the absolute best for our children. So while these couples may sound crazy to some, I think it’s actually a super-sweet gesture to try to give their kids the best possible life path—even if that means speeding up their pregnancy plans.

That said, early C-Sections are not a good idea! The March of Dimes believes the best gestation period is at least 39 weeks long in order to have the optimal brain and lung development and to have the highest chance of having no visual or hearing problems. I hope couples considering that make sure that they are allowing their baby to fully develop before making that kind of decision. Because causing a premature birth and all of the complications that go with that—when it can be prevented—is no way to start a child’s life.

TELL US: Would you time your birth around astrology?

Wondering if you’re having a boy or a girl? Check out our Ancient Chinese Birth Chart!

Image of Chinese baby courtesy of Shutterstock.

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