Archive for the ‘ Pregnancy News ’ Category

Jaime King Is Pregnant Again!

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

Jaime KingJaime King is expecting her second child with director-husband Kyle Newman. The “Hart of Dixie” actress shared a pregnancy announcement on Instagram. An oh-so-cute 16-month-old James Knight is seen with a “I’m gonna be a big brother!” sign.

The clever Insta caption read, “So excited to announce THE SEQUEL Coming later this year!! … #BabyTown2 – Created by @kyle_newman and @jaime_king. Also starring #JamesKnight”

King is one tough mama who’s been open about her struggles with infertility, multiple IVF treatments, and miscarriage. Speaking to People, King once shared, “If I’m open about it, hopefully it won’t be so taboo to talk about it.”

Despite her difficulties, King ended up conceiving naturally and giving birth to James Knight in 2013.

We’re excited for King’s latest baby blessing, and can’t wait to find out if she’ll have another awesome themed baby shower and which celeb godparents she’ll pick (maybe Taylor Swift?!).

See how other celebs shared their pregnancy announcements!

Sherry Huang is a Features Editor for Parents.com. She loves collecting children’s picture books and has an undeniable love for cookies of all kinds. Her spirit animal would be Beyoncé Pad Thai. Follow her on Twitter @sherendipitea.

Baby Announcement Wrapped in a Surprise Gift
Baby Announcement Wrapped in a Surprise Gift
Baby Announcement Wrapped in a Surprise Gift

Photo of Jaime King via Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

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Which “Game of Thrones” Actress Is Expecting (Again)?!

Monday, February 16th, 2015

Lena HeadeyLena Headey, who plays the deliciously evil Cersei Lannister on the popular HBO show, is expecting her second child, confirms People.

This is the second child for Headey, who also has a 4-year-old son, Wylie, with an ex-husband. No other news has been released, such as the baby’s gender or father, but Headey requested some privacy along with her pregnancy announcement.

In an interview with The Telegraph last year, the British actress shared her desire to be a mom to more than one child. “My dream is to have more kids,” she said. “I love being a mum and that’s been the hardest thing for me, trying to put to bed my desire to have more children.”

There’s no doubt Headey’s most likely over-the-moon (or is that over Westeros?) about her pregnancy. As she once tweeted:

Sherry Huang is a Features Editor for Parents.com. She loves collecting children’s picture books and has an undeniable love for cookies of all kinds. Her spirit animal would be Beyoncé Pad Thai. Follow her on Twitter @sherendipitea

Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?
Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?
Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?

Photo of Lena Headey via s_bukleyShutterstock.com

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A New Study Confirms: Pregnancy Can Be Riskier When You’re an Old Lady

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Closeup of Pregnant Woman's BellyLet’s face it: Pregnancy can be challenging —both physically and emotionally—whether you’re 21 or 41. But as more and more women delay having children, we no longer bat an eye when mamas of a certain age, from celebs like Halle Berry to our coworkers and next-door neighbors, appear to sail through pregnancy and deliver healthy, bouncing babies.

But a new study from the University of Eastern Finland proves what many older moms already know: Pregnancy can be riskier when you’re of an “advanced maternal age” (that’s charming medical speak meaning “over the age of 35″).

Reeta Lamminpää, MHSc, looked at data from nearly 700,000 Finnish women, specifically observing “pregnancy outcomes and complications… in four different groups of older women: women diagnosed with preeclampsia, women who were smoking, who were overweight or obese and who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).” Not surprisingly, she found that “AMA women had increased risks related to pregnancy and birth compared to younger women aged less than 35 years old.” Specifically:

“AMA women with preeclampsia had increased risk especially for preterm deliveries and small-for-gestational-age-infants (SGA). AMA women who were smoking had increased risk especially for low birth weight (LBW), preterm deliveries, foetal death and SGA-infants. AMA women who were overweight or obese had increased risk especially for preterm deliveries, foetal death, large-for-gestational-age―infants (LGA), Caesarean and preeclampsia. AMA women diagnosed with GDM had increased risk especially for preterm deliveries, foetal death, LGA-infants and preeclampsia.”

Yikes! However, the study points out that identifying older moms-to-be in these at-risk categories could mean earlier detection of complications and lead to healthier moms and babies—and that’s good news for moms of any age.

Image: Shutterstock

Swelling During Pregnancy: When to Worry
Swelling During Pregnancy: When to Worry
Swelling During Pregnancy: When to Worry

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Good News for Laboring Moms: Study Finds No Link Between Pitocin and ADHD

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

PregnancyIf you have ever spent time worrying that the Pitocin used to aid your delivery could result in ADHD in your kid, now would be a good time to relax.

Earlier, some scientists had raised flags concerning the possibility that Pitocin, a manufactured version of the hormone oxytocin that is frequently used to speed along childbirth, could be linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder later in those babies’ lives. But a significant new study found no connection between the two. Whew!

The new data, published online in the journal Pediatrics, comes from the birth records for more than a half million babies born in Denmark over an eight-year period ending in 2008. Less than one percent of the kids whose moms had been treated with Pitocin—26 percent of the total group—ever developed or were treated for the attention disorder.

Researchers did however find an increase in the occurance of ADHD in kids born to moms who were under the age of 20, or babies who were born prematurely before 32 weeks, and whose birth weights were less than 6.35 pounds.

Given that Pitocin played a role in my own babies’ births, I’m relieved to see the new data. One less thing to worry about!

Did Pitocin play a role in your delivery?

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Alesandra Dubin is a new twin mom. She’s also a Los Angeles-based writer and the founder of home and travel blog Homebody in Motion. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Google+ and Twitter.


Labor & Delivery: Inducing Labor
Labor & Delivery: Inducing Labor
Labor & Delivery: Inducing Labor

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

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Severe Postpartum Depression May Actually Start in Pregnancy

Friday, February 6th, 2015

BellyPostpartum depression happens to between 15-20 percent of mothers, and it affects each woman differently. A recent study, published in Lancet Psychiatry, has found a link between when a woman’s symptoms set in and how severe her symptoms are—which may be the key in determining which women are at risk.

Related: Could Postpartum Depression Happen to You?

The study followed 8,200 mothers in seven different countries—some women were medically diagnosed, some were evaluated through a questionnaire, and others fell into both categories. The mothers were then split into smaller groups depending on the type of depression they suffered from: severe, moderate, and mild or clinically insignificant.

Researchers found that two-thirds of women who suffered from the most extreme symptoms, including suicidal thoughts, panic, and frequent crying, actually contracted these symptoms during pregnancy, reports the NY Times. Moderately depressed mothers typically reported their symptoms after childbirth.

Related: Postpartum Depression May Last Beyond the First Year for Some

Further research is needed to determine which biological factors contribute to postpartum depression—but Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody, the study’s corresponding author and director of University of North Carolina’s perinatal psychiatry program, believes this study could lead to answers about maternal depression.

“Ideally, you could determine who’s at risk,” she said. “What we do now is wait for people to get sick.”

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She’s a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

Postpartum Depression: Postpartum Depression vs. Baby Blues
Postpartum Depression: Postpartum Depression vs. Baby Blues
Postpartum Depression: Postpartum Depression vs. Baby Blues

Image: Woman holding pregnant belly via Shutterstock

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