Archive for the ‘ Healthy Pregnancy ’ Category

Could YOU Handle a Pregnancy at 51?

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

That’s the question a lot of readers are asking after checking out the New York Post’s article on Manhattan publicist Tracey Kahn, who’s a single mom pregnant with her second child at the age of 51.

Tracey reasons out that she’s in good health, well-off, and excited to have two children. And she’s not alone—according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of women having children over age 50 have increased fourfold over the past decade. And we’ve seen plenty of celebrities, including Halle Berry, Uma Thurman, Nicole Kidman and Gwen Stefani, become pregnant after age 40.

Of course, there are risks associated with late-age pregnancy, such as increased risk for type 2 diabetes, stillbirth, and placenta previa for the mom-to-be, and increased risk of Down Syndrome or other genetic issues for the baby. (But Tracey’s using donor sperm and eggs, so she bypasses those issues, at least for her child.)

How old is too old to become a new mom? I know I feel too old, and I’m just in my early 40s—despite my daughters’ pleadings for a little sister or brother. But if you’re healthy, you’re energetic, and you’re motivated—why not? Kudos to Tracey for taking on motherhood at 51.

Tell us: How old were you when you had your last child? Would you consider becoming pregnant over 50?

Take our quiz to find out if you’re ready for another baby. And don’t forget to like Everything Pregnancy to keep up with the very latest pregnancy-related news!

Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?
Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?
Pregnancy Myths: What Should You Believe?

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Pregnant? Make Sure You Get This Vaccine…

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

One immunization should be on your to-do list if you’re expecting: the flu shot. According to new guidelines announced by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, getting the annual flu shot is especially important for you and your baby when you’re pregnant.

Your immune system changes when you’re expecting, making it more likely that you’ll develop complications, including early labor, more serious illness, and pneumonia, if you get the flu. And getting the flu vaccine when you’re pregnant lets you pass on the antibodies and protect your newborn until he or she is old enough to be vaccinated at six months.

Right now, only about half of all pregnant women get the flu vaccine each year, but experts are hoping the number of pregnant women who get the shot increases with the announcement of these guidelines.

Tell us: Did you get the flu shot when you were pregnant? Why or why not?

Are you expecting? Find out what’s going on with your baby by signing up for our Daily Kick newsletter, and like Everything Pregnancy on Facebook to keep up with the latest pregnancy-related news.

The Vaccine Schedule
The Vaccine Schedule
The Vaccine Schedule

Image: Vaccine by Peerayot/Shutterstock.com

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New Study: Healthy Babies Don’t “Start From Scratch”

Friday, August 15th, 2014

We know we’re all about the healthy lifestyle once that pregnancy test is positive, but researchers are discovering that the health of mom and dad way before the baby is conceived plays a part in their child’s future health, too.

According to a new paper by researchers at the University of Adelaide, there’s evidence that poor health pre-conception can preprogram your baby to have poor health in his future, too. “Many things we do in the lead up to conceiving is having an impact on the future development of the child — from the age of the parents, to poor diet, obesity, smoking and many other factors, all of which influence environmental signals transmitted into the embryo,” Professor Sarah Robertson, a coauthor of the paper “Parenting from before conception” published in the journal Science, says.

The study authors found links between parents’ poor health and a child’s future poor health, including increases in diabetes, heart disease, and immune disorders.

So if you’re even thinking about getting pregnant, now’s the time to start building good health habits—quitting smoking, eating healthier, and boosting your fitness levels. That can help ensure that your baby gets the best start in life.

Test your pregnancy IQ with our quiz. And don’t forget to like Everything Pregnancy on Facebook to keep up with the very latest in pregnancy news and information.

How to Eat Healthy During Pregnancy: What
How to Eat Healthy During Pregnancy: What
How to Eat Healthy During Pregnancy: What "Eating for Two" Really Means

Image: Newborn by Inara Prusakova/Shutterstock.com

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THIS Could Make it Harder for You to Breastfeed…

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Here’s another good reason why you should work hard to stay healthy during your pregnancy: A study by the University of Minnesota found that women who had health issues during their pregnancies were 30 percent less likely to breastfeed their children.

Using survey data, the study discovered that women who had certain predefined health issues—diabetes, high blood pressure, or obesity—going into pregnancy were far less likely to be breastfeeding after birth.

But the study also found that if women with health conditions were given plenty of support by the hospital and medical staff, they were more likely to breastfeed.

So here’s the takeaway: With all the benefits for baby and mom from breastfeeding, we should be working hard to ensure healthier pregnancies from the start, and to support new moms in their breastfeeding efforts.

Tell us: Did your health affect your ability to breastfeed?

Test your breastfeeding IQ, and keep up with the latest pregnancy news by signing up for our pregnancy newsletters, or liking Everything Pregnancy on Facebook.

How to Hold Baby While Breastfeeding
How to Hold Baby While Breastfeeding
How to Hold Baby While Breastfeeding

Image: Breastfeeding by Oksana Kuzmina/Shutterstock.com

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Could Your Age Determine How You’ll Deliver?

Monday, August 11th, 2014

While some recent studies have brought good news for women hoping to get pregnant after 35, this latest research isn’t so rosy.

According to a new study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, older moms-to-be are at increased risk of requiring emergency measures to give birth, whether that’s a C-section or an “operative vaginal delivery,” which includes forceps or ventouse. In fact, the study found that women over 40 had triple the rate of emergency C-sections, and nearly double the rate of operative vaginal deliveries of women 20 to 24. Women over 40 had a 22.4 percent emergency c-section rate, and a 23.7 percent rate of use of forceps or ventouse. And those rates aren’t just for high-risk moms-to-be: That’s the rate for healthy older moms.

But maternal age wasn’t the only risk factor for these emergency interventions—using an epidural, induction of labor, large birthweight or a gestational age over 41 weeks were also factors.

Long story short? If you’re an older mom, your doctor should be aware of the likelihood that intervention may be necessary—and you should be realistic about your odds of requiring a little help to bring that baby into the world.

Tell us: If you’re an older mom, did you have an unexpected C-section or another emergency intervention? How did you handle it?

If you’re getting ready to give birth, consider these birth plan strategies to ensure that your wishes are met. And don’t forget to like Everything Pregnancy on Facebook to keep up with the latest pregnancy news.

Beyond the Birth Plan
Beyond the Birth Plan
Beyond the Birth Plan

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