Posts Tagged ‘ parents ’

The Lego Movie Is The Boy Version Of Frozen

Sunday, June 15th, 2014

3 years, 6 months.

Dear Jack,

It has been well established that you and I are huge fans, as well as advocates, of The Lego Movie.

Not only did I write to you back in November about how excited I was that the movie was coming out, but then in February I wrote a letter to you (which got over 1,200 likes on Facebook) telling all about the two of us going to see your very first movie in a theatre; which obviously, was The Lego Movie.

So that helps explain why I was asked by Lego to do an “unboxing and review” of the Everything Is Awesome Edition of The Lego Movie on my other blog site, Family Friendly Daddy Blog, where I review cars, movies, food, travel destinations, etc.

With a release date of June 17th, it’s just in time for our annual family vacation to California which is coming up soon, so you can watch the movie while on our trip.

Seeing The Lego Movie again, after having recently seen Frozen for the first time as a family, I can’t help but compare the two.

It appears as if The Lego Movie is the boy version of Frozen.

By that, I don’t mean at all that the movies share similar plot lines. Instead, I mean that the themes that The Lego Movie deal with seem a little more relevant to boys; while the themes of Frozen are more feminine, in my opinion.

Maybe the best way to word it is that The Lego Movie is an action movie, while Frozen is a chick flick.

I still can’t get over the fact that in Frozen, the whole thing could have been prevented had the parents of Elsa and Anna, the King and Queen of Arendell, not taught their daughters to close off communication with each other.

Seriously, what normal parents decide to basically lock their daughter in her room for most of her whole childhood because she has a superpower? As the King and Queen, could they seriously not have found some kind of wizard dude to cure her before coming to such an extreme decision?

Frozen is worth all the hype, but it just bothers me that the whole plot was a result of the parents teaching horrible communication skills to their kids, as well as setting them up to hold in their emotions.

Meanwhile with The Lego Movie, while the whole thing is a fantasy, at least it doesn’t hinge on some easily preventable premise.

The plot instead is more like Die Hard and Braveheart, in which a regular guy ends up outsmarting and overpowering the bad guys and their whole system by recruiting average Joes to join the cause of the underdog, therefore freeing his people.

I’m not saying that Frozen is definitely for girls and that The Lego Movie is definitely for boys, but I do feel that your fellow dude friends at your preschool seem a little disconnected while “Let It Go” plays over the speakers at the end of the day when I pick you up.

But if it were “Everything Is Awesome” playing instead, there would be a class of full of little boys jumping around, singing the words at the top of their lungs.

 

Love,

Daddy 

Add a Comment
Back To The Dadabase

Boys Can Make Toys Out Of Anything, Like A Plastic Potato

Saturday, June 7th, 2014

3 years, 6 months.

Dear Jack,

Almost exactly 3 years ago on June 21st, 2011, back when you were just 7 months old, I wrote a Dadabase entry called “The Magically Entertaining Wooden Spoon.”

It talked about your ability to make a toy out of anything.

You still have that skill, by the way.

But these days, you also find a way to make a chore out of the new toy you discover.

Two weekends ago while at your cousin Calla’s 3rd birthday party, you somehow found a plastic potato container.

Apparently, Nonna (my mom) got it kind of as a joke for your Auntie Dana (my sister) to pack snacks for her lunch, back when she was in high school.

One of the things I didn’t mention in my most recent letter to you about the birthday party is that for the first hour or so, you were carrying around that plastic potato with his googly eyes.

You used the potato as a place to store the rocks you found in the backyard.

I think it would be safe to use the words “proud” and “protective” to describe the way you carried that thing around.

Of course, you did share it without whoever wanted to see it for a minute. But you kept a close eye on it, as you can see in this picture.

So in closing, you have knack for finding a way to make a toy out of just about any random thing you find. Then, your version of playing with that new toy comes across more like work; or at least a game.

Honestly, you’re a pretty low maintenance kind of kid.

Maybe if you’re lucky, I’ll upgrade you: I could just give you a real potato and say, “Here ya go, Son. Have fun.”

The thing is, I’m sure you would.

 

Love,

Daddy

Add a Comment
Back To The Dadabase

Family Friendly Road Trip: Wizard World Atlanta Comic Con

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

3 years, 6 months.

Dear Jack,

I have learned that there are certain things that are just so much better once a child is introduced to the equation.

Swimming would be a great example. The only times I’ve bothered stepping into a swimming pool in the past 3 and a half years has been because of you.

Having a child has also introduced me to new experiences that I might not have otherwise been exposed to.

When I was invited to attend the Wizard World Atlanta Comic Con, to my surprise, Mommy said she wanted to go too, and of course, we brought you along as well.

Turns out, it was a really good idea to take a 3 and a half year-old little boy who loves Spiderman and Captain America to a place where there would be a lot of people, many of them who were dressed up as Spiderman and Captain America.

So we loaded up the Prius and took the fun drive from Nashville to Atlanta. When you’re in the presence of so many adults dressed in impressive costumes of comic book characters, it’s only natural to want to get your picture made with them.

In fact, I got the feeling that’s part of the culture at Wizard World Comic Atlanta Con: It’s as if there is an unspoken contest going on the whole time in which those who show up in costume are seeing who can get the most “uncostumed” people to ask to get their picture made with him.

And of course, we helped many costumed attendees gain points from us.

In addition to the array of Captain Americas and Spidermen, we also saw many scary looking villains and zombies. The funny thing is, they were some of the friendliest to speak with.

You just went along with it, no matter how scary or creepy; Mommy and I explained to you beforehand that the Wizard World Atlanta Comic Con was kind of like Halloween.

Our road trip proved that Atlanta is a very friendly and fun place to visit, and this was easy evidence of that.

In fact, Mommy suggested that we go to the Wizard World Comic Con when it comes here to Nashville in September.

Only, we wouldn’t be going as spectators… we’d be going as a family dressed up as comic book characters.

I think Halloween might come early this year for us…

 

Love,

Daddy

 

Add a Comment
Back To The Dadabase

Family Friendly Road Trip: SkyView In Atlanta, GA

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

3 years, 6 months.

Dear Jack,

In the same way I’ve been establishing myself as a car reviewer from a family friendly perspective, I will begin doing the same thing with our road trips from now on.

Here in just a few weeks, we’ll be road tripping from Sacramento to Lake Tahoe!

But for my first official “family friendly road trip,” I want to feature our visit to the wonderful city of Atlanta, Georgia this past weekend.

As we drove our Prius closer to downtown, we saw a giant Ferris wheel. While it wasn’t part of our itinerary, we were actually there just to check out the Wizard World Comic Con, Mommy and I were able to convince you to check out the SkyView Ferris wheel with us.

For the three of us, it cost about $28 to go 20 stories high; 4 turns.

I feel it was well worth the money. It’s definitely not something a family normally gets to do, outside of a circus.

It definitely provided for some pretty cool pictures and memories. Plus, it’s something that helped you build confidence in yourself. I’m amazed how much you didn’t question it at all.

You just gladly hopped on board.

Seriously, we were 20 stories high! You are only 3 and a half. Your willingness to try the SkyView, without worrying or crying, was quite impressive.

I enjoyed watching from the seat across from you and Mommy, seeing the looks on your faces as we scoped out the city of Atlanta from above, where the people below appeared as tiny ants marching. (Dave Matthews Band reference.)

Yep, our family did an unplanned, random, fun “touristy” thing in the very friendly city of Atlanta. And sure enough, you bragged about it to all your friends and teachers at school yesterday.

I have a feeling that the next time we visit Atlanta, which I hope is later this summer, you are going to ask to ride the “big wheel” again.

 

 

Love,

Daddy

Add a Comment
Back To The Dadabase

I Guess I’m Supposed To Hate Common Core…

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

3 years, 6 months.

Dear Jack,

You’re still a few years away from us having to worry about this, but there’s something called Common Core, and apparently, you and I are supposed to loathe it the way vegans across America cringe when they hear the word “Monsanto.”

From what I can understand, in an attempt for America to compete with the rest of the world in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (also referred to as STEM), 45 of 50 of the United States have adopted a teaching system which is intended to help students understand complex problems by picking them apart, rethinking them, and building solutions.

It’s also meant to prepare them for college and work expectations.

In other words, I suppose the theory is that America is too “right-brained.” We need to become more “left-brained” to compete on a global scale.

Maybe we need to start thinking more like computers and less like poets? (That’s my attempt at being sarcastic, by the way.)

I should be very clear to say, I cannot truly be a critic of Common Core, because I am not experiencing it daily, like so many parents are; who I see complain about it on Facebook and Twitter.

Seriously, I can’t scroll through my Facebook feed on any given day without at least seeing one complaint about Common Core.

So from that, I will just assume that you and I both will learn to hate Common Core within the next few years when the time is right.

However, something I will always teach you is to be open-minded. On paper, I love the concept of Common Core.

The question is, “Is it actually more effective?” I don’t know.

It makes a lot of sense to me, though. In school, I never did well in math or science; which ultimately led to me getting an English degree, because by default, it was the one thing I was good at.

Perhaps I could have benefited from Common Core when I was a kid? Maybe it could have taught me to think in a way where I would have actually liked math.

We’ll find out with you.

You know how I am. If I am believe it is ineffective, I’ll let you know. 

But as for now, I want to like Common Core. I can’t dislike something I’ve never tried. We’ll give it fair shot.

It’s not like we really have a choice anyway, right?

 

Love,

Daddy

 

Common Core
Source: TopMastersinEducation.com

Add a Comment
Back To The Dadabase