Posts Tagged ‘ math ’

I Guess I’m Supposed To Hate Common Core…

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

3 years, 6 months.

Dear Jack,

You’re still a few years away from us having to worry about this, but there’s something called Common Core, and apparently, you and I are supposed to loathe it the way vegans across America cringe when they hear the word “Monsanto.”

From what I can understand, in an attempt for America to compete with the rest of the world in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (also referred to as STEM), 45 of 50 of the United States have adopted a teaching system which is intended to help students understand complex problems by picking them apart, rethinking them, and building solutions.

It’s also meant to prepare them for college and work expectations.

In other words, I suppose the theory is that America is too “right-brained.” We need to become more “left-brained” to compete on a global scale.

Maybe we need to start thinking more like computers and less like poets? (That’s my attempt at being sarcastic, by the way.)

I should be very clear to say, I cannot truly be a critic of Common Core, because I am not experiencing it daily, like so many parents are; who I see complain about it on Facebook and Twitter.

Seriously, I can’t scroll through my Facebook feed on any given day without at least seeing one complaint about Common Core.

So from that, I will just assume that you and I both will learn to hate Common Core within the next few years when the time is right.

However, something I will always teach you is to be open-minded. On paper, I love the concept of Common Core.

The question is, “Is it actually more effective?” I don’t know.

It makes a lot of sense to me, though. In school, I never did well in math or science; which ultimately led to me getting an English degree, because by default, it was the one thing I was good at.

Perhaps I could have benefited from Common Core when I was a kid? Maybe it could have taught me to think in a way where I would have actually liked math.

We’ll find out with you.

You know how I am. If I am believe it is ineffective, I’ll let you know. 

But as for now, I want to like Common Core. I can’t dislike something I’ve never tried. We’ll give it fair shot.

It’s not like we really have a choice anyway, right?

 

Love,

Daddy

 

Common Core
Source: TopMastersinEducation.com

Add a Comment

When Kids’ Messes Are Really Deconstruction Learning Exercises

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

17 months.

Jack is finally learning how to actually play with his Lego-like blocks. He likes to see how tall he can build his tower or sword or lightsaber or whatever it’s supposed to be.

But for Jack, it’s just as much fun to tear down and break apart as it is to create.

For the past couple of weeks now, I have noticed that during his playtime, he likes to make messes… for fun.

It’s been nearly a decade since I took a Child Psychology class back when I was in college, but I have to assume that right now my son is working out the engineering part of his brain.

He is teaching himself how to deconstruct things so that he can rebuild them.

My wife told me that Jack likes to abruptly swipe all his bath toys off the tub’s ledge into the water, only to carefully place them back in order.

I’ve said it before, but I truly think Jack is going to be the opposite of me when it comes to his motor skills. He will be a clear-thinking, math and science guy; whereas I’m a deep-thinking, abstract, communications kind of guy.

That’s a good thing. We’ll have plenty to learn from each other.

Of course, that’s not to say that Jack won’t end up being a very sociable little boy, because it’s seems to me he already is.

Yes, I could have allowed myself to become annoyed when Jack started his new daily game of emptying his six different toy caddies in our living room.

But I just remind myself that my son that is becoming his own mechanics teacher.

I can’t believe I just now thought of this, but why am I cleaning up his toys when playtime ends? After all, I shouldn’t deprive him of the very valuable reconstructive lesson of placing his toys back where they belong.

He’s not a baby anymore. He’s a lightsaber swinging toddler who is sure to get better math and science grades than I ever did.

 

 

 

Add a Comment