Posts Tagged ‘ GCB ’

Is ABC’s “GCB” Degrading To Christian Women?

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

15 months.

As a daddy blogger, I take special effort to criticize when husbands and dads are negatively stereotyped in pop culture. Just the same, I will not be silent when I see the same thing happening to women and moms.

Well, it’s happening right now with the new TV show GCB on ABCIn a nation where women are the slight majority and up to 75% of the population identifies themselves as Christians, it’s not a good idea for the title of your program to be insulting to both women and Christians. (Look up “GCB” if you need to in the first link at the beginning of this paragraph.)

Here’s the irony though. If the very majority that the show attempts to satirize simply doesn’t watch the show, I can’t imagine that the program would be renewed for a second season. Mathematically it just wouldn’t make sense.

It would be nothing short of bigotry and bad taste to substitute the “C” for a “J” for Jewish or “A” for Asian. But because Christian women are the majority, they are evidently fair game.

But most importantly, according the trailer for GCB, the “Christian” women who serve as the protagonists are materialistic, back-stabbing, husband-stealing, plastic surgery obsessed gossips.

Do some women like that exist in Christian circles? Yes.

I guess I’m asking non-Christians an important question here: What is the true perception you have of the majority of Christian women you actually know in real life?

Despite there always being some not living up to major aspects of their faith, in general, is that really how Christian women should be generalized and therefore portrayed?

If so, would it be acceptable to make a show a sitcom about American Muslims who are training to be terrorists, instead of portraying them as honest, righteous, hard-working people; like the kind of Muslims I know in real life?

Ultimately, the entertainment industry wants to produce what makes money. If it takes mocking Christian women to do the job, then they will. Similarly, if they can make money off of 19 Kids and Counting on TLC, which legitimately features actual Christian women, then they will.

I don’t believe Hollywood is evil; they just want to be successful and profitable.

What’s more relevant to consider here is if there is a large enough audience out there willing to support the venture. And I just don’t imagine good Christian women wanting to watch GCB.

My wife, who is a good Christian woman, has already informed me she definitely will not be watching the show. But who knows? She’s only one of millions who feels the same way.

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Is Huggies’ “Ultimate Test: Dad” Ad Degrading to Fathers?

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

15 months.

 

At this point in American society, it is basically becoming taboo to stereotype dads and husbands as half-witted goons, as was accepted in recent decades. It used to be that advertisers could target stay-at-home moms by making a caricature of their husbands. But now that dads make up 33% of stay-at-home parents, that model is essentially invalid.

The video clip above very humorously shows several examples of commercials where this sexist approach has still been recently used by Lysol, Hasbro, Cheerios, Benadryl, Febreeze, Naturemade, Stanley Steamer, Glade Sense and Spray, Uno Attack, Walmart, Orville Rendenbacher’s, Ortho, and Yellowbook.

“Doofy Husbands: Target Women” by Sarah Haskins also cleverly points out examples of commercials targeted to men; featuring cool, good-looking guys: Infiniti, Nivea, Heineken, and Miller Lite. Of course, in these advertisements the men are assumed to be single; whereas in the ones where men are goof balls, they are clearly married.

Basically, once you marry the man, it’s like watching the opposite of the evolution of man.

Two weeks ago, I published an article called Fathers Are 1/3 of Stay-At-Home Parents, But Still Pay The “Dad Tax” where I featured the “dad ads” of the March 2012 issue of Parents magazine. One of those ads was Huggies’ “Ultimate Test: Dad”.

At the time, I subconsciously thought for a half-second: “Wait, it almost sounds like they are making fun of dads; implying that dads are bumbling idiots who barely know how to change a diaper- one of the very ideas that I passionately denounce here on The Dadabase.”

But then I stopped myself with this rebuttal: “No, by putting dads to the ultimate test they mean that dads are tough on messes, like Mr. Clean. Yeah, that’s it… sure.”

So I moved forward with promoting it as a legitimate dad ad; because ultimately, a sponsor was making a point to acknowledge the involvement of dads regarding their product and I recognized (and still recognize) the importance of that.

Now here we are, living two weeks into the future, and a full-time stay-at-home Superdad named Chris Routly has gotten over 1,000 people (as of this minute) to sign a petition against the ad:

“Please, join me in asking them to drop the ‘Ultimate Test: Dad’ element entirely, and instead focus on actually celebrating the wonderfully active dads who use HUGGIES every day with the same competence and care as moms.”

I say this Chris Routly fellow is a smart guy and he makes a valid point.

He’s not being dramatic and asking dads, who currently make up 1/3 of stay-at-home parents, to ban Huggies. Instead, he’s asking Huggies to recognize their mistake and redirect their energy on a different ad that undoubtedly celebrates dads instead of questions their parenting abilities based on gender.

Chris Routly puts it this way, in his petition:

“How are dads a test? As a dad, am I simply too dumb to use them properly?

Why is a dad on diaper duty an appropriate or meaningful test of the product in any way a mom using them is not?

Why reduce dads to being little more than test dummy parents, putting diapers and wipes through a ‘worst-case scenario’ crash course of misuse and abuse?”

I think however this all pans out, it will be a valuable (and expensive) lesson to all advertisers from now on:

Don’t insult dads and husbands. We’re 33% of your buying power as stay-at-home parents.

 

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