Tamera Mowry-Housley Gives Birth to Baby #2!

tamera mowry-housleyIt’s a girl for Tamera Mowry-Housley! The actress and her husband, Adam Housley, welcomed daughter Ariah Talea on Wednesday afternoon. The little girl weighed a healthy 10 lbs., 2 oz and measured 20.5 inches. This is the couple’s second child; their son, Aden, is 2 1/2.

“We are beyond overjoyed and blessed with our beautiful baby girl,” they told People. “Aden already made a welcome video for her.”

The Real co-host has been refreshingly candid about the ups and downs of this second pregnancy, including how her body has changed. “Every woman carries pregnancy differently,” she told American Baby. “I carry big. It doesn’t matter how much I eat or exercise, I make big babies. Also, I showed a lot sooner with this second baby.”

The famous twin also didn’t hold back about the difficulties of being pregnant while caring for a toddler. “When you’re pregnant and have a toddler, you are sleepy all the time,” she said. With my first pregnancy, I could nap whenever I wanted to, and I had fewer dishes and clothes to wash. And while getting to the gym is hard in general, when you’re a mom, it’s so difficult. Plus, while everyone else may be kinder to you when you’re pregnant, your toddler doesn’t take it easier on you at all. You have to keep up!” (We hear, Tamera!)

Congratulations on the newest member of your family, Tamera, Adam and Aden!

Don’t forget to sign up to receive our free Parents Daily Baby newsletter!

Bonnie Gibbs Vengrow is a New York City-based writer and editor who traded in her Blackberry and Metro card for playdates and PB&J sandwiches—and the once-in-a-lifetime chance to watch her feisty, funny son grow up. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.

Pregnancy Workouts: How to Stay Motivated
Pregnancy Workouts: How to Stay Motivated
Pregnancy Workouts: How to Stay Motivated

Image of Tamera Mowry-Housley courtesy of Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Want to Make Baby’s 4th of July Safer? Don’t Forget This!

4th of julyRaising a child in Manhattan, I think about noise every day. Specifically, how to keep my kid at a safe distance from the whining sirens, screeching subways and deafening jackhammers that are part and parcel of life in a bustling city.

But apparently, those sounds are nothing compared to the snap, crackle, pop that will take place across the country this weekend. The 4th of July may be one big love letter to patriotism, cookouts and big band music, but it’s also hell on our ears. According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, a dazzling fireworks display can register as high as 150 decibels. That’s louder than a chainsaw (100 dB), a jet engine taking off (120 dB) and even a jackhammer (130 dB). (P.S. Anything louder than 85 dB can cause permanent hearing loss – in you and your baby.)

Does this mean you should wrap up the party before the sun goes down? Not necessarily. ASHA offers some common-sense-tips so you can enjoy the 4th of July safely:

  • Keep your distance. Protect your fam’s precious ears by staying 500 feet (or roughly one and a half football fields) away from the noise.
  • Be mindful of limits. If you think a noise is too loud or going on too long, step away with baby. Far, far away.
  • Cover up. Leave room in the diaper bag for ear protection: ear plugs for you and ear muffs for your babe.

Of course, if you’re ever concerned that your kiddo’s hearing isn’t 100 percent, call your pediatrician. Some signs of hearing loss in young children include a lack of attention to sounds, pulling or scratching at the ears, no response to their name or simple directions, and delays in speech and language development.

Related: Fireworks Safety Rules and Tips for Families

Bonnie Gibbs Vengrow is a New York City-based writer and editor who traded in her Blackberry and Metro card for playdates and PB&J sandwiches—and the once-in-a-lifetime chance to watch her feisty, funny son grow up. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.

Speech Development Warning Signs
Speech Development Warning Signs
Speech Development Warning Signs

Image of fireworks courtesy of Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Normalize Breastfeeding Now Has Its Own Day of Recognition

breastfeeding momOur bare breasts have been awfully newsworthy these days, and for that we can thank two different, but related, campaigns: #FreetheNipple (which has been buoyed by Scout Willis, a documentary and Iceland) and #NormalizeBreastfeeding (which counts Alyssa Milano, Extra‘s Terri Seymour and model-mom Nicole Trunfio among its high-profile fans).

Related: Celebrity Breastfeeding Photos and #Selfies

But before the #brelfies and fashion spreads, there was Vanessa Simmons, a San Diego-based photographer and mom of three who wanted to remove the stigma of breastfeeding in public. So last June, she began #NormalizeBreastfeeding, a now international movement that encourages women share their stories, offer and receive encouragement, and ask questions.

Simmons’ pet project received a major boost in November, when Milano infamously posted a gorgeous black-and-white breastfeeding selfie that spawned its own mini-movement. (It was the first time I had heard of #normalizebreastfeeding.) But she recently cemented the cause’s place in the spotlight by applying for—and receiving—an official day of recognition from San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulcone. Now, June 27 is the International Day to Normalize Breastfeeding. Simmons chose that particular day because it was the day she founded her campaign, plus it was available on the list of “International Days” recognized by the United Nations.

The response has been overwhelmingly positive so far. In fact, other states have hopped on the pro-public breastfeeding bandwagon: The mayors of Houston, Texas and Kansas City, Mo., issued similar proclamations, and supporters from Mobile, Ala., to Sterling Heights, Mich., staged local events.

The push to make public nursing more acceptable couldn’t come at a better time, as moms continue to be kicked out of stores, shuttled into grimy bathrooms, and shamed on social media, all because their baby was hungry and—gasp!—they didn’t cover up. Though there have been some high-profile signs of acceptance (thank you, Pope Francis), more needs to happen before mamas around the world are able to nurse their babies anywhere, anytime without fretting about accidentally flashing some top boob. Hopefully, this International Day to Normalize Breastfeeding is the next step to help get us there!

Don’t forget to sign up to receive our free Parents Daily Baby newsletter!

Bonnie Gibbs Vengrow is a New York City-based writer and editor who traded in her Blackberry and Metro card for playdates and PB&J sandwiches—and the once-in-a-lifetime chance to watch her feisty, funny son grow up. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.

Pain-Free Breastfeeding
Pain-Free Breastfeeding
Pain-Free Breastfeeding

Image of breastfeeding mom courtesy of Shutterstock

Add a Comment

THIS Is How a Newborn Actually Sees You

Ever wonder what your newborn sees in those early days of life? We know a little, mostly that their vision is pretty limited in the beginning and that they can see more shades of light and dark as their pupils begin to enlarge. But what this actually looks like has been a bit of a mystery to us parents. Until now.

Researchers at Norway’s University of Oslo and Sweden’s Uppsala University and Eclipse Optics teamed up to show us just how much (or little) a newborn can see. As suspected, a two- or three-day-old can make out faces and maybe even expressions from 8 to 12 inches away (or about 30 centimeters). But double that distance and the image is far too blurry for them to see.

Check out the illustration for yourself:

newborn vision

Unlike other attempts to understand infant vision, this study relied on video, since a moving image is easier to see than a still one. Researchers recorded people changing expressions – from happy to surprised to angry to neutral – and filtered out any details that they know are unavailable to babies (like color). Then they showed the videos to adults, with the idea being that if they couldn’t make out the filtered expression, the chances were good that a baby couldn’t either. The grown-ups correctly named expressions in three out of the four cases at 30 centimeters, though they struggled to identify them all from 120 centimeters away. This confirmed for researchers that babies can see the expressions and faces of the person holding them an arm’s length away.

But the study, which was published in the Journal of Visiondoes more than just fill in the blanks for new parents. It could also explain how newborns can mimic our expressions in the early weeks of their lives, when their vision is still developing. Still, more studies are needed to fine-tune and build on this research, says Svein Magnussen, study co-researcher and University of Oslo professor emeritus. “It’s important to remember that we have only investigated what the newborn infant can actually see, not whether they are able to make sense of it,” he says.

Still, it’s fascinating to get a peek into what, exactly, our babies are able to see. Personally, I was a little surprised at how blurry the images appear even at 30 centimeters. (I always assumed my son could see me more clearly than that!) But how about you? Does this illustration match up with what you had in mind? Any surprises there? Tell us in the comments below!

Don’t forget to sign up to receive our free Parents Daily Baby newsletter!

Bonnie Gibbs Vengrow is a New York City-based writer and editor who traded in her Blackberry and Metro card for playdates and PB&J sandwiches—and the once-in-a-lifetime chance to watch her feisty, funny son grow up. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.

When to Worry: Eye and Vision Problems
When to Worry: Eye and Vision Problems
When to Worry: Eye and Vision Problems

Illustration courtesy of Professor Bruno Laeng at the Department of Psychologoly, University of Oslo

Add a Comment

Twin Brothers Welcome Sons Within Minutes Of Each Other

baby boyBritish identical twin brothers Richard and Ben Fearon are as close as they can be. They live down the road from each other in the same town, work at the same refinery and, as of this weekend, became fathers within an hour of each other.

The brothers and their partners were (naturally) in neighboring rooms at Princess of Wales Hospital, in Grimsby. Louie George was the first baby to arrive, at 4:05 a.m., to proud dad Richard and his partner, Annabel. Not to be outdone, an hour later Ronnie James was welcomed into the world by his parents, Ben and Kayleigh.

“I’m very close to my brother but we didn’t expect this,” Richard told the Mirror. “We do a lot together and we were in and out of hospital together on the day. It shows how close we are.”

The new moms were also surprised that their sons arrived on the same day. “We were joking about it through our pregnancies about if we would go into labor on the same day,” Annabel said. “But I never thought it would happen. I thought they would come on separate days.”

Their assumption makes sense. After all, it’s not every day that identical twin brothers welcome babies into the world on the same day. (Ben told the Mirror that the odds were 150,000 to 1.) Amazingly, so far this month, we’ve seen it happen twice. Besides the Fearon brothers, Texas identical twins Karen and Kathy gave birth to their kiddos on June 17.

Although the baby boys aren’t brothers, the Fearons hope they’re just as close. “Hopefully they will look out for each other, too,” Ben said. “I’m sure they’ll be more like brothers than cousins.”

Congratulations to the happy families!

Don’t forget to sign up to receive our free Parents Daily Baby newsletter!

Bonnie Gibbs Vengrow is a New York City-based writer and editor who traded in her Blackberry and Metro card for playdates and PB&J sandwiches—and the once-in-a-lifetime chance to watch her feisty, funny son grow up. Follow her on Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.

Birth Stories: When You're Expecting Twins
Birth Stories: When You're Expecting Twins
Birth Stories: When You're Expecting Twins

Image of newborn courtesy of Shutterstock

Add a Comment