Happy Adoption Story from a Family of Adopted Kids

I asked readers of The Adoption Diaries to tell me a happy, true story of adoption because we’ve been focusing on some of the recent foster care and adoption horror stories, like the Sandusky scandal at Penn State.

So outspoken reader Jamie wrote, “Here’s a good adoption story. If you did more research you would find many good stories. My aunt and uncle adopted my cousin when he was two days old, and he is loved, treated with all the respect in the world. He was never abused by anyone. My own parents adopted three children: my older brother was adopted when he was 7; my sister and I were adopted at ages 3 and 4.

Raised happy, good Jewish kids by the grace of God. We all had wonderful childhoods and we’re all still close.  My brother went on to be an underwater welder, my sisters are both in college now and I’m an aesthetician; all four good people with great lives.

I am sure that  99% of adoptive parents are good loving people who don’t rape or abuse there children…”

That’s a smart response to my lamenting posts about adopting from foster care and being afraid of the the emotional composition of these kids, many of whom were born addicted to drugs or alcohol.

Breaking News: Father’s Age Is Linked to Autism

Cell mutations become more numerous with advancing age, so older men are more likely than younger ones to father a child who develops autism or schizophrenia. Scientists just reported in Nature last week, the age of mothers had no significance.

According to the study, surging rate of autism diagnoses over recent decades is partially attributable to the increasing average age of fathers, and may account for as many as 30 percent of new cases. The overall risk to a man in his forties is 2 percent and increases each year.

There are many autistic children up for adoption in foster care situations all across America; it takes a strong commitment to parent a troubled kid.

Do you know anyone who’d adopted an autistic child and has tips for other parents?

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