International Toddler Adoption or Stolen-Child Trafficking?

As news of child trafficking in China and Guatemala make headlines, rumors explode about international adoptions in these countries, and how big a role  child trafficking plays in poor countries where newborns may be stolen for adoption to wealthier and more stable countries.

Countries that have placed limits, sometimes closed or partially closed because of concerns over coercion of birthparents or “illegal adoption” include Vietnam, Cambodia, Nepal, Guatemala, and Romania. China, reputedly, is working to contain corroborated trafficking within its orphanage system.

Faced with such accounts of trafficking,
parents of course have an instinctive reaction of shock or guilt or even disbelief. By adopting, could you have fueled this trade?

Some parents who adopt internationally will question the need to bring up things that happened in their child’s past. Could you personally admit that money may have driven your birth parents’ decision, or that your joyful toddler comes from poor parents who never even gave consent?

If corruption exists in your child’s birth country or may have played a role in your baby’s adoption, I believe it’s not your fault. You didn’t set out to “steal” anyone’s baby.

Tell me what you think about international adoption from a country that gives you doubts?

While we’re on controversial adoption subjects, do you think that Hollywood A-list celebs who adopt children get an easier time of it because they can likely afford an international adoption?

Add a Comment
Back To The Adoption Diaries, by Nicole Dorsey-Straff
  1. by Cindy

    On June 30, 2012 at 11:39 am

    I know for a fact that my child’s birth mother willingly decided to relinquish her child (South American adoption) and received no cash for the exchange. We know because we met her when my son was three months old, prior to completing his adoption. Not all adoptions are corrupt. Why is the focus on trafficking? Where is the media coverage for legitimate international adoptions in which no corruption was involved. The positive stories a abound and it’s time those stories be told.