American Association of Poison Control, “Children Act Fast and so does Poison”

The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) is cautioning parents, grandparents and caregivers that poisonings happen in just a few seconds!  “About half of all poison exposures involve children younger than 6, most often occurring when parents are busy preparing meals. Poisonings also occur when the normal routine changes – during holidays or while moving, visiting or traveling,” Carr said.

In 2010, U.S. poison centers answered more than 3.9 million calls, including nearly 2.4 million calls about human exposures to poisons. In children, about 40 percent of poisonings involve medicines; the other 60 percent of poisonings in children involve products such as plants, cleaning supplies, cosmetics, pesticides, paints and solvents.
Poisoning is the fourth leading cause of death among children, with peak incidences occurring between ages 1 and 3.

“The 50th anniversary of National Poison Prevention Week is the perfect time to stress the importance of poison-proofing your home to keep your children and grandchildren safe.”

America’s 57 poison centers are committed to safeguarding the health and well-being of every American through poison prevention and free, confidential, expert medical services. Poison centers respond to calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week in order to help those who have been exposed to toxic substances.

Here are their tips:

• Inspect your home and garage to make sure medicines, cleaning products, pesticides and fertilizers are stored up high, away and out of sight of children.

• Tell children what medicine is and why you must be the one to give it to them. Never call medicine “candy” to get kids to take it.

• Don’t leave medicines or vitamins on counters, window sills, bedside tables or the refrigerator top.

• Keep cleaning products and household chemicals in their original containers with their original labels intact.
• Keep batteries out of a child’s reach. Call your local poison center right away if a child swallows a battery.

• Keep magnetic toys and other magnetic items away from small children. Call your local poison center right away if you think a child has swallowed a magnet.
• Know the name of all household plants in your home; remove any poisonous plants from your house and yard.

• Remember that child-resistant is not child-proof. Layer the protection: re-seal and lock up, out of sight and reach.

Have you ever had an accident like this with a foster child or an adoptee? Tell me your story here!

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