Twin Newborns: 8 Items You'll Need in Bulk!

Protect & Soothe

5. Burpie Cloths

After each feeding, each baby will need burping. Often, baby burps travel with spit-up. Hopefully, you will have Daddy or a second set of hands burping one baby while you burp the other. You'll need to protect yourselves from the burp cheese.

Even if you are handling burp duty single-handedly (which eventually you will have to) each baby deserves a fresh, cheese-free cloth. There are precious burp cloths out there that coordinate with bibs and outfits. If you get some as gifts, fantastic. For day-to-day and middle of the night use, cloth diapers serve the purpose well.

While on the subject of burping, let me digress. When your babies are small, you will probably not burp them over your shoulder as you usually see on TV. For the first three to four months, until they really get good neck control, it often works best to burp baby while he or she sits on your lap. Hold his or her jaw around the chin in one hand supporting the head, and firmly pat the baby's back with your other hand. We draped the burpie cloth over our hand supporting the head, and put the extra cloth over the leg toward which the baby was facing, just in case. Each baby gets a fresh cloth each burp session.

You will need to feed babies approximately eight times each 24-hour period the first couple of months. Get 20 to 30 cloths and you should be fine. You'll be doing laundry often enough for that to be about right. If you feel you need more, get more. You can always use them for dustcloths or to mop up mini-messes later.

Side note: Not a single book I read indicated when the parent-induced burping should stop. The "after-every-feeding" burping process continued for us until ours were about 6 months, and intermittently after that until they were about 8 months. Ours were exceedingly gassy. Yours may need regular burping for a shorter (or maybe longer) window of time.

6. Pacifiers

Two mouths. Both have a suck reflex, and are soothed by the process. You'll need a minimum of two pacifiers. If you plan to breastfeed your babies, some wisdom advocates holding off a bit on introducing the pacifiers until nursing/latching is well-established. The phrase "nipple confusion" is one you will hear repeatedly. Personally, I don't believe in nipple confusion where a binkie is concerned. No nourishment flows through a pacifier; give your babies some credit.

Now on the flip side, when a fast-flow bottle is introduced frequently prior to nursing/latching becoming well-established, that may cause problems getting the babies to breastfeed. Not because they are "confused" between nipples, but because the bottle nipple makes it far easier to get big mouthfuls of milk rapidly, and with minimal effort.

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