Is Your Baby Dehydrated?

Treatment Based on Degree of Dehydration Chart

Degree of dehydration Minimal or no dehydration
Rehydration Therapy Just replacement of losses

 

Replacement of losses

Children under 22 lbs (10 kg): 2 to 4 ounces (60 to 120 mL) oral rehydration solution (ORS) for each diarrheal or stool or vomiting episode

Children more than 22 lbs (10 kg): 4 to 8 ounces (120 to 240 mL) ORS for each diarrheal stool or vomiting episode

Nutrition

Continue breastfeeding, or resume age-appropriate normal diet after initial hydration, including adequate caloric intake*


Degree of dehydration Mild to moderate dehydration
Rehydration Therapy ORS, 1.6 to 3.3 oz for each 2 lbs of body weight (50 to100 mL per kg body weight) over 3 to 4 hours
Replacement of losses

Children under 22 lbs (10 kg): 2 to 4 ounces (60 to 120 mL) oral rehydration solution for each diarrheal or stool or vomiting episode

Children more than 22 lbs (10 kg): 4 to 8 oz. (120 to 240 mL). ORS for each diarrheal stool or vomiting episode

Nutrition Continue breastfeeding, or resume age-appropriate normal diet after initial hydration, including adequate caloric intake*

* Overly restricted diets should be avoided during bouts of diarrhea. Breastfed infants should continue to nurse even during acute rehydration. Infants too weak to eat can be given breast milk or formula by medical personnel through a tube. Lactose-containing formulas are usually good. If the baby can’t absorb lactose-based formula, lactose-free formulas can be used. Complex carbohydrates, fresh fruits, lean meats, yogurt, and vegetables are all recommended. Carbonated drinks or commercial juices with a high concentration of simple carbohydrates should be avoided.

Parents Are Talking

Add a Comment