Nursing 101: All About Breastfeeding

Got Milk?

Baby's first meal from Mom isn't milk, it's colostrum, a yellowish liquid rich in antibodies that boosts his immune system. Your real milk will come in a few days after you give birth. Don't worry -- you'll know when it's there! Your breasts may feel like they're full of rocks, or that they're about to burst (this is called engorgement). The good news is that your hungry baby can really help you out; the best way to relieve engorgement is to nurse often. Drink a large glass of water every time you nurse, eat well, and take your prenatal vitamins.

A major concern for new moms is whether baby is getting enough to eat; after all, you can't count the ounces. If you hear and see your baby swallowing, he's drinking. And if he's filling plenty of diapers with urine and soft, yellow stools, at least eight a day, he's getting nourishment. However, you should call your pediatrician if your baby exhibits these signs:

  • Your baby stops feeding after 10 minutes or less.
  • Your baby is frequently fussy and lethargic.
  • Your baby's skin is yellowing.
  • Your baby's stools are hard and dark.

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