Baby Symptom Checker

Wondering what's causing your baby's diarrhea or those red bumps on her arm? Use our Baby Symptom Checker to find out. Select the body part where your baby's experiencing problems, then click on the symptom to learn more about probable causes and treatments.

Baby Symptoms By Body Part

Baby Symptoms A-Z

Forehead

Fever

Temperature higher than 100.4°F when taken with a rectal thermometer or 99°F with an armpit thermometer. Regardless of cause, call doctor if baby 12 weeks or younger has a fever of 100.4°F or higher (do not give fever medicine before being seen) or if older baby still has fever over 104°F two hours after fever medicine. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.

Possible Causes

Bronchiolitis
Signs include cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, mild cough, sometimes a mild fever, wheezing, and rapid breathing. Caused by viral infection of the small breathing tubes (bronchioles) of the lungs. Call doctor if breathing is difficult. Use saline nasal drops and suction to clear mucus.
Chicken Pox
Virus causes red rash of small blisters that turn to open sores, then crust over. Call doctor. Can give acetaminophen to babies 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Croup
Starts with cold symptoms (runny nose and fever), then inflames the upper airways, voice box, and windpipe resulting in sudden harsh, barking cough (like a seal) or hoarseness, often at night. Moisten air with a cool mist humidifier or take infant into a steamy bathroom. Run a hot shower to create a steam-filled room where you can sit with your baby (not in shower) for 10 minutes. Viral croup lasts 3 to 7 days. Call doctor right away if infant has high-pitched squeaking noise called stridor when inhaling, labored breathing, appears dehydrated, or has difficulty swallowing.
Ear Infection
Signs include fever, not responding to sounds, pulling at ears, crying more than usual (especially when lying down) or ear discharge. Typically caused by a cold or another viral infection that traps fluid inside the ear. Often gets better without antibiotics. Call doctor if baby is less than 6 months old or if there's ear discharge. For pain, can give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Febrile Seizure
Signs may include up to 3 minutes of body twitching and unconsciousness. Convulsions caused by a sudden spike in body temperature, but can also occur when a fever is on its way down. Usually ends without treatment. Call doctor after any seizure.
Fifth Disease
Viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on cheeks that can spread to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Infection with Coxsackie virus causes small, painful mouth ulcers and blisters on hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks. Also low-grade fever, sore throat, loss of appetite, and irritability. Clears without treatment within a week or so. Call doctor if infant's sore throat or mouth sores prevent him from drinking fluids or infant shows signs of dehydration: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Immunization Reaction
Fever may start within 24 hours and last 2 to 3 days; or start 1 to 4 weeks after live MMR and chicken pox vaccines. Vaccines stimulate the immune system to respond and make antibodies as if there were a real infection. Call doctor if infant has seizures; difficulty breathing; very high fever (above 104°F); hives; mouth, throat, or facial swelling; extreme irritability; or generalized rash. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose, and sore throat may last a week or 2. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor.
Pneumonia
Signs include fever, chills, lethargy, sweating, and loss of appetite. Babies may be pale and limp, cough, wheeze, or have fast labored breathing. Respiratory infection that is complication of a cold. Call doctor immediately.
Roseola
Viral illness marked by sudden high fever of often over 103°F that lasts 3 to 7 days followed by a splotchy rash of pinkish-red spots that turn white when touched. Also may have swollen neck lymph nodes, irritability, and decreased appetite. Call doctor if infant's lethargic, not feeding, or fever won't come down. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Scarlet Fever
Signs include fine red rash on the trunk, arms, and legs; fever of 101° to 104°F. Child's face may turn red with a pale area around his mouth. This typically follows a bout of strep throat. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
Strep Throat
Red and swollen tonsils, sometimes with white patches or streaks of pus; swollen, tender lymph glands (nodes) in the neck; fever; sometimes vomiting in younger children; tiny red spots on the soft or hard palate–the area at the back of the roof of the mouth; difficulty swallowing. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed. For pain, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Urinary Tract Infection
Signs include fever; foul-smelling, cloudy, or bloody urine; crying when urinating; refusal to feed; or vomiting. Bacteria in the urinary tract cause infections of the kidneys, bladder, or urethra. Call doctor immediately. Antibiotics are needed.
Whooping Cough
Infant first has cold-like symptoms (runny nose, sneezing, low-grade fever, red watery eyes), then develops severe, hacking cough that ends in high-pitched whooping sound when infant breathes in. Bacterial infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor right away. Antibiotics are needed.
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Red Marks (Head)

Red or pink skin patches

Possible Causes

Capillary Hemangiomas
Raised red spots that often start off white or pale caused by a collection of blood vessels in the skin. May enlarge during the first year, then most shrink and eventually almost disappear without treatment by the time a child is school-age.
Erythema Toxicum
Rash of yellowish or white bumps surrounded by a ring of redness that are sometimes filled with fluid; there may also be no bumps and only splotchy redness. Appears 1 to 2 days after birth. Usually disappears within a week or so without treatment.
Port Wine Stain
Large, flat, irregular-shaped dark-red or purple marks caused by extra blood vessels under the skin. Can be reduced with laser surgery.
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Rash (Head)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Pustular Melanosis
Dark-brown bumps or blisters present at birth particularly in dark-skinned infants. Rash–scattered across neck, back, arms, legs, and palms–dries up leaving freckle-like dark spots that disappear without treatment in a few weeks.
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Flaky Scalp

Skin disorder causes dandruff-like flakes

Possible Causes

Cradle Cap
Noninfectious, non-itchy , scaling, red skin that appears in first weeks after birth and disappears slowly over weeks or months. Wash daily with mild baby shampoo and use a soft brush to help remove scales. Call doctor if area becomes extremely reddened and itchy, which could signal a yeast infection.
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Flat or Odd Shape

Infant's head is misshapen

Possible Causes

Craniosynostosis
Birth defect causes skull's bone joints to close prematurely before brain has completely formed. Call doctor if baby's head seems unusually shaped. Usually requires surgery.
Plagiocephaly
Back or one side of infant's head is flattened due to spending a lot of time on one side. Reposition baby–move baby's head to alternate side–when she sleeps at night and offer lots of supervised tummy time during the day. Call doctor if infant's head is flattening or has unusual shape. May need a prescription custom-molded helmet or headband.
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Tilted Head

Infant holds head in twisted or abnormal position

Possible Causes

Congenital Muscular Torticollis
Signs include tilting of the infant's head to one side; the infant's chin turns toward the opposite side. Caused by injury to muscle connecting breastbone, head, and neck that occurs during birth or in the womb. Call doctor. Gentle physical therapy exercises stretch neck muscles. Surgery is sometimes needed.
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Sunken Soft Spots

Openings in the baby's skull bones, called fontanelles, that curve into the skull

Possible Causes

Dehydration
Signs include sunken fontanelles (soft spot) on top of head, parched dry mouth, fewer tears when crying, and fewer than 6 wet diapers a day. Caused by loss of bodily fluids often due to vomiting, fever, or diarrhea. Call doctor immediately. Do not give acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Continue nursing or giving formula. May also give pediatric electrolyte solution.
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Eyes

Watery discharge

Tears fill eyes and may run down face even if baby is not crying

Possible Causes

Blocked Tear Ducts
Underdeveloped tear-duct system prevents eye wetness from properly draining. Talk to your doctor about massaging the area several times a day and applying warm compresses to the eye. Most ducts open on their own by 12 months.
Pinkeye
Eyes and eyelids are red and watery; discharge in one or both eyes becomes crusty overnight. Caused by infection of the membrane lining the eyelid and part of the eyeball. Apply warm compresses. Call doctor. Antibiotics may be needed.
Foreign Object
Object (eyelash, dried mucus, dirt) irritates the eye. Remove with moistened corner of a washcloth or irrigate the eye with water.
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Crusty Eyelids

Yellow, hard crust causes eyelids to stick together especially in the morning

Possible Causes

Blocked Tear Ducts
Underdeveloped tear duct system prevents eye wetness from properly draining. Talk to your doctor about massaging the area several times a day and applying warm compresses to the eye. Most ducts open on their own by 12 months.
Pinkeye
Eyes and eyelids are red and watery; discharge in one or both eyes forms a crust overnight. Caused by infection of the membrane lining the eyelid and part of the eyeball. Apply warm compresses. Call doctor. Antibiotics may be needed.
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Bumpy Eyelid

Reddish lump on eyelid

Possible Causes

Sty
Painful, pus-filled bump at the edge or inner surface of eyelid caused by an infected oil gland. Apply warm compresses. Most go away on own within a week. Call doctor if sty lasts more than a week or redness and swelling spread to other parts of face.
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Yellow Tint

Yellow discoloration in a newborn's skin and eyes

Possible Causes

Jaundice
Bilirubin, a byproduct of the breakdown of hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying substance in red blood cells), builds up faster than infant's liver can break it down. See a doctor if baby's between 1 and 5 days old.
No Tears When Crying
Infant sheds few, if any, tears when crying
Dehydration
Signs include sunken fontanelles (soft spots) on top of head, parched dry mouth, fewer tears when crying, and fewer than 6 wet diapers a day. Caused by loss of bodily fluids often due to vomiting, fever, or diarrhea. Call doctor immediately. Do not give acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Continue nursing or giving formula. May also give pediatric electrolyte solution.
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Sunken Eyes

Eyes seem to recede or sink into infant's head

Possible Causes

Dehydration
Signs include sunken fontanelles (soft spots) on top of head, parched dry mouth, fewer tears when crying, and fewer than 6 wet diapers a day. Caused by loss of bodily fluids often due to vomiting, fever, or diarrhea. Call doctor immediately. Do not give acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Continue nursing or giving formula. May also give pediatric electrolyte solution.
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Red Marks (Eyes)

Pink or red skin patches

Possible Causes

Nevus Simplex
Red markings at nape of neck (stork bites), between the eyebrows or over the eyelids (angel kisses), or around the nose and mouth. Tend to darken or look redder when baby's upset or excited. Caused by dilated skin capillaries that are present at birth or form in first months of life. Some disappear without treatment in about 18 months. See doctor if marks remain after 3 years.
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Ears

Pulling on Ears

Infant reaches for or tugs on ear

Possible Causes

Ear Infection
Signs include fever, not responding to sounds, pulling at ears, crying more than usual (especially when lying down) or ear discharge. Typically caused by a cold or another viral infection that traps fluid inside the ear. Often gets better without antibiotics. Call doctor if infant is less than 6 months old or there's ear discharge. For pain, can give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Swimmer's Ear
Signs include liquid draining from ear. Caused by excess moisture in ear that allows bacteria to infect canal lining. Call doctor. Antibiotic eardrops are needed.
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Discharge

Clear, cloudy, or yellowish pus-like liquid drains from ear

Possible Causes

Ear Infection
Signs include fever, not responding to sounds, pulling at ears, crying more than usual especially when lying down, or ear discharge. Caused by a cold or another viral infection trapping fluid inside the ear. Often gets better without antibiotics. Call doctor if infant is less than 6 months old or there's ear discharge. For pain, can give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Foreign Object
Signs include tugging on ear. Items like pieces of food or small toys enter and irritate the earlobe or canal allowing bacteria to infect canal lining. Call doctor for removal. Antibiotic eardrops may be needed.
Swimmer's Ear
Signs include liquid draining from ear. Caused by excess moisture in ear that allows bacteria to infect canal lining. Call doctor. Antibiotic ear drops are needed.
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Nose

Stuffy or Runny Nose

Nasal tissues and blood vessels become swollen with excess fluid or mucus that either causes congestion or runs out the nose or down the back of the throat

Possible Causes

Bronchiolitis
Signs include cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, mild cough, sometimes a mild fever, wheezing, and rapid breathing. Caused by viral infection of the small breathing tubes (bronchioles) of the lungs. Call doctor if breathing is difficult. Use saline nasal drops and suction to clear mucus.
Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to babies 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Fifth Disease
Viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on cheeks that spreads to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Foreign Object
Signs include nasal drainage with bad odor or bloody nose. Food, a toy, a tissue or another object becomes lodged in infant's nose. Call doctor immediately.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose and sore throat may last a week or 2. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor immediately.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus/RSV
Viral infection of lungs and breathing passages that produces cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, and low-grade fever. Infants may have rapid or difficulty breathing. Call doctor.
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Sneezing

Body's way of removing irritants from nose

Possible Causes

Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
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Nosebleed

Tiny blood vessels in lining of nose are ruptured. Bleeding often stops on own. Otherwise, tilt infant's head slightly forward, gently pinch nose just below bony ridge and apply pressure continuously for about 10 minutes.

Possible Causes

Dryness
Lack of moisture in air dries out nasal membranes so they crack and bleed. Call doctor if bleeding won't stop after 2 attempts of applying pressure for 10 consecutive minutes each, infant is coughing or vomiting blood, or if bleeding is heavy or the result of a fall or head blow. Keep nasal passages moist with humidifier and saline spray.
Foreign Object
Signs include nasal drainage with bad odor or bloody nose. Food, a toy, a tissue, or another object becomes lodged in infant's nose. Call doctor immediately.
Strep Throat
Red and swollen tonsils, sometimes with white patches or streaks of pus; swollen, tender lymph glands (nodes) in the neck; fever; sometimes vomiting; tiny red spots on the soft or hard palate–at the back of the roof of the mouth; difficulty swallowing. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed. For pain, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
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Red Marks (Nose)

Pink or red skin patches

Possible Causes

Nevus Simplex
Red markings at nape of neck (stork bites), between the eyebrows or over the eyelids (angel kisses), or around the nose and mouth. Tend to darken or look redder when baby's upset or excited. Caused by dilated skin capillaries that are present at birth or form in first months of life. Some disappear without treatment in about 18 months. See doctor if marks remain after 3 years.
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White Bumps (Nose)

Cluster of pearly-white bumps

Possible Causes

Milia
Skin flakes become trapped in small pockets near skin's surface causing tiny, white bumps on nose, cheeks, and chin that looks like acne. Disappears without treatment a few weeks after birth. Wash gently–don't scrub–with warm water and gentle cleanser. Call doctor if acne doesn't clear up within 3 months.
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Cheeks

Rash (Cheeks)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Fifth Disease
Viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on usually both cheeks that spreads to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Miliaria
Pregnancy hormonal changes stimulate newborn's oil glands causing raised red bumps with yellow or white heads on infant's cheeks, chin, and forehead. Wash gently–don't scrub–with warm water and a gentle cleanser. Call doctor if it doesn't clear up within 3 months.
Pustular Melanosis
Dark-brown bumps or blisters present at birth particularly in dark-skinned infants. Rash–scattered across neck, back, arms, legs, and palms–dries up leaving freckle-like dark spots that disappear without treatment in a few weeks.
Roseola
Viral illness marked by sudden high fever of often over 103°F that lasts 3 to 7 days followed by a splotchy rash of pinkish-red spots that turn white when touched. Also may have swollen neck lymph nodes, irritability, and decreased appetite. Call doctor if infant's lethargic, not feeding, or fever won't come down. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
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White Bumps (Cheeks)

Cluster of pearly-white bumps

Possible Causes

Milia
Skin flakes become trapped in small pockets near skin's surface causing tiny, white bumps on nose, cheeks and chin. Usually disappears without treatment a few weeks after birth. Wash gently–don't scrub–with warm water and gentle cleanser. Call doctor if it doesn't clear up within 3 months.
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Mouth

Sore Gums

Gums are inflamed and tender

Possible Causes

Baby-Bottle Tooth Decay
Cavities that form when milk or juice given to an infant in a bottle or sippy cup (especially at night) pool around teeth allowing bacteria to attack and decay teeth. Untreated cavities can cause gum infections. Clean gums with moist cotton gauze. All infants should see dentist by age 1.
Teething
Infant may drool, chew on objects, and be cranky. Gum swelling and sensitivity are caused by teeth working their way through gums. May begin at 3 months and continue until age 3. Massage gums with moist cotton gauze, offer a rubber teething ring or a chilled washcloth for chewing. All infants should see dentist by age 1.
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Drooling

Excess saliva in mouth

Possible Causes

Teething
Infant may drool, chew on objects, and be cranky. Gum swelling and sensitivity are caused by teeth working their way through gums. May begin at 3 months and continue until age 3. Massage gums with moist cotton gauze, offer a rubber teething ring or a chilled washcloth for chewing. All infants should see dentist by age 1.
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White Patches

Milky-colored nodules inside mouth

Possible Causes

Epstein's Pearls
Benign cysts on roof of baby's mouth. In most cases, will disappear without treatment in a few weeks.
Natal Teeth
Primary or baby teeth present at birth. May be removed during hospital stay if roots are too loose. If not, see a pediatrician or dentist.
Neonatal Teeth
Primary or baby teeth that erupt in first 30 days after birth. See pediatrician or dentist.
Thrush
Overgrowth of yeast that causes creamy, whitish, painful patches on lips, tongue, or inside cheeks that look like cottage cheese, but can't be wiped away. Call doctor. Mom and infant need antifungal medication. If mother is breastfeeding, she will need ointment for her nipples.
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Red Blisters

Inflamed red sores in or around infant's mouth

Possible Causes

Cold Sores
Herpes simplex virus causes swollen gums, painful red blisters on tongue and around mouth, and sometimes fever. First infection is always the worst. Call doctor if infant is 6 months old or younger. Typically, sores disappear without treatment in about 2 weeks.
Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Infection with Coxsackie virus causes small, painful mouth ulcers and blisters on hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks. Also low-grade fever, sore throat, loss of appetite, and irritability. Clears without treatment within a week or so. Call doctor if baby's sore throat or mouth sores prevent him from drinking fluids or baby shows signs of dehydration: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
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Stomach

Abdominal Pain

Baby draws knees into chest or seems excessively fussy or uncomfortable, particularly after eating

Possible Causes

Colic
Healthy, well-fed baby cries inconsolably for at least 3 hours a day, 3 days a week for more than 3 weeks. Typically starts 3 to 6 weeks after birth and often improves without treatment around 3 months.
Constipation
Infrequent bowel movements or hard, dry stools that are difficult to pass. Often occurs when infant switches to whole cow's milk at age 1 or starts solids. Offer more fluids and fiber-rich fruits and vegetables. Call doctor if problem persists for 2 weeks or pain seems severe, if there is abdominal swelling, blood in stool, or fever/vomiting.
Food Allergy
Signs include hives, facial swelling, wheezing, diarrhea, or vomiting. Immune system reacts to proteins found in certain foods–mainly cow's milk (including milk protein found in formula), peanuts, soy, eggs, or wheat. Call doctor immediately. Infant may outgrow certain food allergies.
Gastroenteritis
Viral intestinal infection (usually rotavirus or norovirus) causes vomiting, watery diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain that can last up to 8 days. Resolves on own. Call doctor if infant has frequent episodes of vomiting for more than 3 hours, is lethargic or dehydrated: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Intussusception
Intestinal obstruction causes severe intermittent abdominal pain, fever, bloody stool, vomiting, and swollen abdomen. Call doctor immediately.
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Vomiting

Spitting up of stomach contents

Possible Causes

Food Allergy
Signs include hives, facial swelling, wheezing, diarrhea, or vomiting. Immune system reacts to proteins found in certain foods–mainly cow's milk (including milk protein found in formula), peanuts, soy, eggs, or wheat. Call doctor immediately. Infant may outgrow certain food allergies.
Gastroenteritis
Viral intestinal infection (usually rotavirus or norovirus) causes vomiting, watery diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain that can last up to 8 days. Resolves on own. Call doctor if infant has frequent episodes of vomiting for more than 3 hours, is lethargic or dehydrated: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose and sore throat may last a week or two. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor.
Intussusception
Intestinal obstruction causes severe intermittent abdominal pain, fever, bloody stool, vomiting, and swollen abdomen. Call doctor immediately.
Pyloric Stenosis
The opening at the lower end of the stomach that connects the stomach and small intestine enlarges and prevents food from passing through, causing severe projectile vomiting. Typically occurs 3 to 5 weeks after birth; rare after 3 months. Call doctor immediately. Surgery may be needed.
Reflux
Infant may spit up breast milk or formula immediately after feedings or sometimes more than an hour after eating. Also may choke or wheeze while feeding, not gain weight, and have wet burps or hiccups. Muscle connecting esophagus to stomach doesn't close properly allowing acidic stomach contents into esophagus. Call doctor. Many babies outgrow GERD by age 1, but some may benefit from medication.
Urinary Tract Infection
Signs include fever; foul-smelling, cloudy, or bloody urine; crying when urinating; refusal to feed; or vomiting. Bacteria in the urinary tract cause infections of the kidneys, bladder, or urethra. Call doctor immediately. Antibiotics are needed.
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Abdominal Bulge

Stomach is swollen or has a protrusion

Possible Causes

Intussusception
Intestinal obstruction causes severe intermittent abdominal pain, fever, bloody stool, vomiting, and swollen abdomen. Call doctor immediately.
Umbilical Hernia
Part of intestines protrudes through abdominal walls causing a bulge near the belly button especially when infant cries. Heals without treatment by age 1. Call doctor if bulge becomes tender, swollen, or discolored.
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Yellowish liquid oozes from navel area

Possible Causes

Infection
Bacterial infection causes base of umbilical-cord stump to become red, bloody or excrete yellow, foul-smelling pus-like discharge. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
Umbilical Granuloma
Small mass of red scar tissue remains on belly button after umbilical-cord stump falls off causing a light-yellowish discharge. Scar tissue usually goes away without treatment in a week. Call doctor if yellow discharge has foul odor (a sign of infection) or if scar tissue's still present after a week.
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Diarrhea

Frequent loose, watery stools that last for several days

Possible Causes

Food Allergy
Signs include hives, facial swelling, wheezing, diarrhea, or vomiting. Immune system reacts to proteins found in certain foods–mainly cow's milk (including milk protein found in formula), peanuts, soy, eggs, or wheat. Call doctor immediately. Infant may outgrow certain food allergies.
Gastroenteritis
Viral intestinal infection (usually rotavirus or norovirus) causes vomiting, watery diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain that can last up to 8 days. Resolves on own. Call doctor if infant has frequent episodes of vomiting for more than 3 hours, is lethargic or dehydrated: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose, and sore throat may last a week or 2. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor immediately.
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Neck & Throat

Sore Throat

Throat becomes dry, painful, or scratchy making swallowing, talking, or crying painful

Possible Causes

Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Infection with Coxsackie virus causes small, painful mouth ulcers and blisters on hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks. Also low-grade fever, sore throat, loss of appetite, and irritability. Clears without treatment within a week or so. Call doctor if infant's sore throat or mouth sores prevent him from drinking fluids or infant shows signs of dehydration: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose, and sore throat may last a week or 2. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor immediately.
Roseola
Viral illness marked by sudden high fever of often over 103°F that lasts 3 to 7 days followed by a splotchy rash of pinkish-red spots that turn white when touched. Also may have swollen neck lymph nodes, irritability, and decreased appetite. Call doctor if infant's lethargic, not feeding, or fever won't come down. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Scarlet Fever
Signs include fine red rash on the trunk, arms, and legs; fever of 101° to 104°F. Child's face may turn red with a pale area around his mouth. This typically follows a bout of strep throat. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
Strep Throat
Red and swollen tonsils, sometimes with white patches or streaks of pus; swollen, tender lymph glands (nodes) in the neck; fever; sometimes vomiting; tiny red spots on the soft or hard palate–at the back of the roof of the mouth; difficulty swallowing. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed. For pain, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
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Swollen Lymph Nodes

Lymph nodes or glands enlarge as they produce extra antibodies to fight infections and illnesses. Usually return to normal when infection or illness is gone.

Possible Causes

Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Ear Infection
Signs include fever, not responding to sounds, pulling at ears, crying more than usual (especially when lying down) or ear discharge. Typically caused by a cold or another viral infection that traps fluid inside the ear. Often gets better without antibiotics. Call doctor if infant is less than 6 months old or there's ear discharge. For pain, can give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Scarlet Fever
Signs include fine red rash on the trunk, arms, and legs; fever of 101° to 104°F. Child's face may turn red with a pale area around his mouth. This typically follows a bout of strep throat. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
Strep Throat
Red and swollen tonsils, sometimes with white patches or streaks of pus; swollen, tender lymph glands (nodes) in the neck; fever; sometimes vomiting; tiny red spots on the soft or hard palate–at the back of the roof of the mouth; difficulty swallowing. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed. For pain, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
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Twisted Neck

Infant holds head or neck in twisted or abnormal position

Possible Causes

Congenital Muscular Torticollis
Signs include tilting of the infant's head to one side; the infant's chin turns toward the opposite side. Caused by injury to muscle connecting breastbone, head, and neck that occurs during birth or in the womb. Call doctor. Gentle physical therapy exercises stretch neck muscles. Surgery is sometimes needed.
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Red Marks (Neck)

Pink or red skin patches

Possible Causes

Nevus Simplex
Red markings at nape of neck (stork bites), between the eyebrows or over the eyelids (angel kisses), or around the nose and mouth. Tend to darken or look redder when baby's upset or excited. Caused by dilated skin capillaries that are present at birth or form in first months of life. Some disappear without treatment in about 18 months. See doctor if marks remain after 3 years.
Port Wine Stain
Large, flat, irregular-shape dark-red or purple marks caused by extra blood vessels under the skin. Can be reduced with laser surgery.
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Rash (Neck)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Pustular Melanosis
Dark-brown bumps or blisters present at birth particularly in dark-skinned infants. Rash–scattered across neck, back, arms, legs, and palms–dries up leaving freckle-like dark spots that disappear without treatment in a few weeks.
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Chest, Trunk & Back

Difficulty Breathing

Breathing seems labored, shallow, or rapid

Possible Causes

Bronchiolitis
Signs include cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, mild cough, sometimes a mild fever, wheezing, and rapid breathing. Caused by viral infection of the small breathing tubes (bronchioles) of the lungs. Call doctor if breathing is difficult. Use saline nasal drops and suction to clear mucus.
Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose, and sore throat may last a week or 2. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor immediately.
Pneumonia
Signs include fever, chills, lethargy, sweating, and loss of appetite. Babies may be pale and limp, cough, wheeze, or have fast labored breathing. Respiratory infection that is complication of a cold. Call doctor immediately.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus/RSV
Viral infection of lungs and breathing passages that produces cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, and low-grade fever. Infants may have rapid or difficulty breathing. Call doctor.
Roseola
Viral illness marked by sudden high fever of often over 103°F that lasts 3 to 7 days followed by a splotchy rash of pinkish-red spots that turn white when touched. Also may have swollen neck lymph nodes, irritability, and decreased appetite. Call doctor if infant's lethargic, not feeding, or fever won't come down. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
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Cough

Body's way of clearing irritants and secretions from lungs to prevent infection

Possible Causes

Cold
Viral infection of the nose and throat can cause low-grade fever of about 100°F, congested or runny nose, sneezing, and coughing. Call doctor if baby's less than 3 months old. Do not give any OTC cold medicine. Suction mucus from nose and moisten air with humidifier. Give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger if there's a fever of 100.4°F or higher and the baby appears to be uncomfortable; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Croup
Starts with cold symptoms (runny nose and fever), then inflames the upper airways, voice box, and windpipe resulting in sudden harsh, barking cough (like a seal) or hoarseness often at night. Moisten air with a cool mist humidifier or take infant into a steamy bathroom. Run a hot shower to create a steam-filled bathroom where you can sit with your child (not in the shower) for 10 minutes. Viral croup lasts 3 to 7 days. Call doctor right away if infant has high-pitched squeaking noise called stridor when inhaling, labored breathing, appears dehydrated, or has difficulty swallowing.
Influenza
Signs include fever that lasts a day or 2 (but can last 5 days); nausea/vomiting, flushed face, cough, stuffy nose, and sore throat may last a week or 2. Viral infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor immediately.
Pneumonia
Signs include fever, chills, lethargy, sweating, and loss of appetite. Babies may be pale and limp, cough, wheeze, or have fast labored breathing. Respiratory infection that is complication of a cold. Call doctor immediately.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus/RSV
Viral infection of lungs and breathing passages that produces cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, and low-grade fever. Infants may have rapid or difficulty breathing. Call doctor.
Whooping Cough
Infant first has cold-like symptoms (runny nose, sneezing, low-grade fever, red watery eyes), then develops severe, hacking cough that ends in high-pitched whooping sound when infant breathes in. Bacterial infection of the respiratory system. Call doctor right away. Antibiotics are needed.
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Wheezing

Infant makes raspy or hissing noise when breathing

Possible Causes

Bronchiolitis
Signs include cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, mild cough, sometimes a mild fever, wheezing, and rapid breathing. Caused by viral infection of the small breathing tubes (bronchioles) of the lungs. Call doctor if breathing is difficult. Use saline nasal drops and suction to clear mucus.
Food Allergy
Signs include hives, facial swelling, wheezing, diarrhea, or vomiting. Immune system reacts to proteins found in certain foods–mainly cow's milk (including milk protein found in formula), peanuts, soy, eggs, or wheat–as harmful. Call doctor immediately. Infant may outgrow certain food allergies.
Pneumonia
Signs include fever, chills, lethargy, sweating, and loss of appetite. Babies may be pale and limp, cough, wheeze, or have fast labored breathing. Respiratory infection that is complication of a cold. Call doctor immediately.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus/RSV
Viral infection of lungs and breathing passages that produces cold-like symptoms: stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, and low-grade fever. Infants may have rapid or difficulty breathing. Call doctor.
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Arms & Hands

Rash (Arms or Hands)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Eczema
This is a chronic skin condition that causes itchy, dry, red skin patches and a rash of small bumps–mostly on cheeks, forehead, scalp, bends of elbows, and behind knees–that occasionally ooze and crust over. Call doctor. Prescription corticosteroid medication may help; antihistamines can control itching.
Fifth Disease
This viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on cheeks that can spread to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months or older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Infection with Coxsackie virus causes small, painful mouth ulcers and blisters on hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks. Also low-grade fever, sore throat, loss of appetite, and irritability. Clears without treatment within a week or so. Call doctor if infant's sore throat or mouth sores prevent him from drinking fluids or infant shows signs of dehydration: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Impetigo
Bacterial infection causes itchy, pus-filled blisters that can burst and may form yellow crusts around infant's mouth and nose, hands and arms, and diaper area. Call doctor. Prescription antibiotics may be needed.
Pustular Melanosis
Dark-brown bumps or blisters present at birth particularly in dark-skinned infants. Rash–scattered across neck, back, arms, legs, and palms–dries up leaving freckle-like dark spots that disappear without treatment in a few weeks.
Scarlet Fever
Signs include fine red rash on the trunk, arms, and legs; fever of 101° to 104°F. Child's face may turn red with a pale area around his mouth. This typically follows a bout of strep throat. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
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Legs & Feet

Rash (Legs or Feet)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Eczema
This is a chronic skin condition that causes itchy, dry, red skin patches and a rash of small bumps–mostly on cheeks, forehead, scalp, bends of elbows, and behind knees–that occasionally ooze and crust over. Call doctor. Prescription corticosteroid medication may help; antihistamines can control itching.
Fifth Disease
This viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on cheeks that can spread to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months or older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Infection with Coxsackie virus causes small, painful mouth ulcers and blisters on hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks. Also low-grade fever, sore throat, loss of appetite, and irritability. Clears without treatment within a week or so. Call doctor if infant's sore throat or mouth sores prevent him from drinking fluids or infant shows signs of dehydration: sunken eyes or soft spot, lack of tears when crying, or decreased urine output.
Pustular Melanosis
Dark-brown bumps or blisters present at birth particularly in dark-skinned infants. Rash–scattered across neck, back, arms, legs, and palms–dries up leaving freckle-like dark spots that disappear without treatment in a few weeks.
Scarlet Fever
Signs include fine red rash on the trunk, arms, and legs; fever of 101° to 104°F. Child's face may turn red with a pale area around his mouth. This typically follows a bout of strep throat. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
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Turned-In Foot

Infant's foot is positioned at odd angle

Possible Causes

Clubfoot
Birth defect that causes top of infant's foot to rotate downward and inward. Foot may be repositioned and put in cast or surgery may be needed.
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Genitals

Missing Testicle (Boys)

Testicle isn't in scrotum

Possible Causes

Retractile Testicle
Overactive testicular muscle causes testicle to move back and forth between scrotum and groin. Usually self-corrects by puberty.
Undescended Testicle
Testicle doesn't drop into scrotum during pregnancy. May need surgery if problem doesn't self-correct by 6 months.
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Inflammation (Boys)

Painful redness or swelling around male genitals

Possible Causes

Balanitis
Glans or head of uncircumcised penis becomes inflamed and seems painful to touch due to bacterial infection, irritants, or poor hygiene. Call doctor immediately. Antibiotics are needed.
Circumcision Infection
Area around head of penis where foreskin has been removed during circumcision persistently bleeds, has foul-smelling discharge or crusted, cloudy fluid-filled yellow sores. Call doctor immediately. Antibiotics are needed.
Hydrocele
Sac around a testicle fills with fluid during pregnancy causing scrotum to be swollen or large at birth. May require surgery if doesn't self-correct by age 1.
Inguinal Hernia
Opening in abdominal wall allows a portion of the intestine to squeeze through creating a small lump or bulge in groin area. Most noticeable when infant cries, strains, or coughs. Call doctor. Surgery is needed.
Phimosis
Foreskin of uncircumcised penis is stretched tight and can't be pulled back. Usually resolves on own. Call doctor if foreskin interferes with urination.
Paraphimosis
Foreskin of uncircumcised penis is pulled back behind head of penis and becomes stuck. Call doctor if pain and swelling occur.
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Foul-Smelling Urine

Urine has strong, bad odor and may look cloudy or bloody.

Possible Causes

Urinary Tract Infection
Signs include fever; foul-smelling, cloudy, or bloody urine; crying when urinating; refusal to feed; or vomiting. Bacteria in the urinary tract cause infections of the kidneys, bladder, or urethra. Call doctor immediately. Antibiotics are needed.
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Rash (Genitals)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Diaper Rash
Skin around buttocks, genitals, and/or thighs is bright red, puffy, and tender-looking from being irritated by wet diapers, diarrhea, detergents, or plastic diaper coverings. Keep skin clean and dry; use a diaper-rash cream. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or don't improve after 3 days of home treatment with OTC ointment. If rash has red dots extending beyond it, infant could have yeast infection that needs prescription antifungal medication.
Impetigo
Bacterial infection causes itchy, pus-filled blisters that can burst and may form yellow crusts around infant's mouth and nose, hands and arms, and diaper area. Call doctor. May need prescription antibiotics.
Perianal Strep
Group A strep bacteria cause fever; bright-red, itchy rash around anus; and possibly blood-streaked, painful stools. May spread to genitals. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
Yeast Infection
Fungal infection causes bright-red, slightly raised rash with red dots extending beyond main rash. Starts in skin creases on buttocks and genitals and then spreads. Call doctor. May need prescription antifungal medication.
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Inflammation (Girls)

Painful redness or swelling around female genitals

Possible Causes

Inguinal Hernia
Abdominal wall opening allows a portion of the intestine to squeeze through causing a small lump or bulge in groin or enlarging one of the outer labia. Most noticeable when infant cries, strains, or coughs. Call doctor. Surgery is needed.
Labial Adhesions
Inflammation or irritation causes part of lips of skin surrounding entrance to vagina (labia) to stick together. Signs include difficulty urinating and urinary tract infections. Consult doctor. Often resolves without treatment.
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Bloody Discharge (Girls)

Menstrual-like release of mucus and blood

Possible Causes

Hormones
Estrogen passed in womb from mother goes through infant's system causing normal menstrual-type bleeding for a few days right after birth.
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Buttocks

Rash (Buttocks)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Diaper Rash
Skin around buttocks, genitals, and/or thighs is bright red, puffy, and tender-looking from being irritated by wet diapers, diarrhea, detergents, or plastic diaper coverings. Keep skin clean and dry; use a diaper-rash cream. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or don't improve after 3 days of home treatment with OTC ointment. If rash has red dots extending beyond it, infant could have yeast infection that needs prescription antifungal medication.
Fifth Disease
Viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on cheeks that can spread to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Impetigo
Bacterial infection causes itchy, pus-filled blisters that can burst and may form yellow crusts around infant's mouth and nose, hands and arms, and diaper area. Call doctor. May need prescription antibiotics.
Perianal Strep
Group A strep bacteria cause fever; bright-red, itchy rash around anus; and possibly blood-streaked, painful stools. May spread to genitals. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
Yeast Infection
Fungal infection causes bright-red, slightly raised rash with red dots extending beyond main rash. Starts in skin creases on buttocks and genitals and then spreads. Call doctor. May need prescription antifungal medication.
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Bloody Stools

Blood found in infant's stools

Possible Causes

Intussusception
Intestinal obstruction causes severe intermittent abdominal pain, fever, bloody stool, vomiting, and swollen abdomen. Call doctor immediately.
Milk Allergy
Signs include irritability, wheezing, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and hives/rash. Caused by allergic reaction to protein in cow's milk, which is found in most commercial formulas. Call doctor. May need to limit dairy if nursing or switch to soy protein?based or hypoallergenic formulas. May go away by age 3 to 5.
Perianal Strep
Group A strep bacteria cause fever; bright-red, itchy rash around anus; and possibly blood-streaked, painful stools. May spread to genitals. Call doctor. Antibiotics are needed.
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Bluish-Gray Marks

Flat areas on dark-skinned infants that appear bruised

Possible Causes

Mongolian Spots
Flat areas of skin with extra pigment that contain various- size birthmarks which appear brown, gray, or blue like a bruise; most often located on back and buttocks. Usually fades without treatment by school age.
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Skin

Rash (Skin)

Cluster of small bumps

Possible Causes

Chicken Pox
Virus causes red rash of small blisters that turn to open sores, then crust over. Call doctor. Can give acetaminophen to babies 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to children 6 months and older. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Eczema
Chronic skin condition causes itchy, dry, red skin patches and rash of small bumps mostly on cheeks, forehead, scalp, bends of elbows, and behind knees that occasionally ooze and crust over. Call doctor. Prescription corticosteroid medication may help; antihistamines can control itching.
Erythema Toxicum
Rash of yellowish or white bumps surrounded by a ring of redness that are sometimes filled with fluid; there may also be no bumps and only splotchy redness. Appears 1 to 2 days after birth. Usually disappears within a week or so without treatment.
Fifth Disease
Viral infection causes mild fever and cold-like symptoms followed by slightly raised, lacy, bright-red rash on cheeks that can spread to torso, arms, buttocks, and thighs. Antihistamines alleviate itching. Call doctor if symptoms worsen or joints swell. For fever, give acetaminophen to infants 6 months and younger; acetaminophen or ibuprofen to older children. Never give aspirin due to risk of Reye's syndrome.
Heat Rash/Prickly Heat
Sweat is trapped beneath skin causing little red bumps or blisters to form. May be itchy. Dress infant in lightweight breathable cotton clothing and use calamine lotion or cool compresses to relieve itching.
Hives
Signs include raised, red, itchy welts that may appear all over the body or on one section of skin, disappear, and then reappear on a different section. Caused by allergic reaction to certain foods, insect bites, or medicines or body's response to viral infection. OTC antihistamines help. Call doctor immediately if infant has trouble breathing.
Impetigo
Bacterial infection causes itchy, pus-filled blisters that can burst and may form yellow crusts around infant's mouth and nose, hands and arms, and diaper area. Call doctor. May need prescription antibiotics.
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