What can I do if my baby gets gassy after feedings?
My baby gets very gassy after feedings. What can I do?
Submitted by American Baby Team

You can help prevent gas by feeding your baby before she cries, a signal that she's too hungry to wait any longer to eat. When you do feed her, use a leisurely pace, because rapid feeding increases her intake of air. If you are breastfeeding and your milk is letting down briskly, you may need to remove your baby for a moment and let the spray of milk slow down so she can manage the flow. If you're bottlefeeding, check the nipple opening to be sure it isn't too large or too small. Bottlefed babies usually swallow more air, especially when the bottle's nipple isn't full of milk.
If your baby still seems uncomfortable, you can help trapped gas move by gently massaging baby's tummy in a clockwise motion while she lies on her back. Or hold your baby securely over your arm in a facedown position, known as the "gas hold" or "colic hold." Still no relief? Ask your pediatrician about trying the over-the-counter anti-gas medication simethicone, sold as Infants' Mylicon Drops, which may help move gas through the intestines.

Originally published in American Baby magazine, August 2005. Updated 2009.

Answered by American Baby Team
Community Answers (4)

i would move my childrens legs in a bicycle motion while on there back. Also i would do a pumping action with there legs that would usually so the trick and the gas would move its way out!
Submitted by stonemir

These are great tips. thanks for sharing!
Submitted by testingva

Boil some water, steep fennel seeds for ten minutes, let it cool, then give your baby the tea. Your baby will pass the gas. It worked like magic for me. My son suffered every day with two episodes of crying and screaming until he was so tired he finally would fall asleep. The first episode lasted seven hours, and the next would last from two to three hours.
Submitted by gensaxton