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How can I get my toddler to take his medication?

My toddler has been recently diagnosed with pneumonia and has been running a high fever. Initially, he took the fever reducer like a champ and the first dose of his antibiotic but now he is refusing to take both medications and it has become the official battle of the week in our house. If he doesn't take the fever reducer his fever becomes uncomfortably high and he has to take the antibiotic. He does not respond well to promises of this or that if he takes the medicine.
Submitted by precious0131

If your child is having fevers and being treated for an infection like pneumonia, it's essential that he gets the antibiotics in to fight the infection (and thus the fever)! I'd prioritize getting the antibiotics down over the fever-reducer, although both are ultimately important for keeping your child comfortable.

 

You can talk with your pediatrician's office about alternatives. For example, some medications are dispensed as a liquid but will also come in chewable form that can be easier to get down. Further, there are new fever-reducers that come in "melt-aways" that are easy to chew and melt in your child's mouth. These can be great for children who fight with liquid medications. Ask the pharmacist about these if you have trouble finding them. Also you can have the pharmacist mix medicine with flavors at the pharmacy or at home you can mix it with chocolate syrup. Offer root beer right after the medicine--it works as a great chaser to cover up yucky tastes. Ultimately, if your child isn't able to tolerate the antibiotics by mouth or misses more than one dose, I recommend you see the pediatrician for follow up the next day.

 

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It may take 2 people, but what we always do with my special needs daughter when she has to take meds she doesn't like is to have 1 person hold her and the other to tilt her head up, pinch her nose and give her the meds. She has to swallow it and then you can love on them when it's all over.
Submitted by el_loco.tortuga
It may take 2 people, but what we always do with my special needs daughter when she has to take meds she doesn't like is to have 1 person hold her and the other to tilt her head up, pinch her nose and give her the meds. She has to swallow it and then you can love on them when it's all over.
Submitted by el_loco.tortuga
Ever had to give medicine to a cat? It's unpleasant, but I had ER nurses show me how to "forcefeed" a toddler using a syringe. In our case it was dehydration and we had to forcefeed the pedialyte, but something like antibiotics it's the same issue - it's got to get into their body! After a horrible weekend of forcefeeding pedialyte every 10 minutes, and then a few instances of having to do the same with medication, the threat of "do I need to get the squirter" ensured compliance!
Submitted by oriane.landry